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Nov 21, 5:00 PM: Summer Internship Information Session

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Summer may feel far away, but it’s a good idea to start learning about internship opportunities sooner rather than later! If you would like to spend your summer working on issues related to gender and/or sexuality, come find out more about the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality internship program which provides 4 students with funding to complete an unpaid internship. Hear from former interns about their experiences and learn about the application process for Summer 2020. And enjoy a warm cup of chai and samosas!

Date: November 21, 2019
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2480023575604707/

Nov 22, 2:30 PM: Student Arts Collective Informational Meeting

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Are you an undergraduate who likes to make art as an expression of questions about gender and/or sexuality? Or you just need to find a space or resources to work on an art project? The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality will be hosting our second year of the Arts Collective to support undergraduate students across disciplines in developing and creating art projects of any kind. Projects may be (but are not limited to): visual arts, written arts, poetry, theatrical pieces, creative fiction and nonfiction, manga and graphic novels, zines, music, film, games, and new media. Come to the information session to hear about our past work and to let us know what would be helpful to you as an artist! Coffee and cookies will be served.

Date: November 22, 2019
Time: 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/970712003261769/

Dec 3, 5:00 PM: Women of the Gulag

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Film Screening and discussion with Director Marianna Yarovskaya. This documentary film tells the compelling and tragic stories of six women who are among the last survivors of the Gulag. These women, now in their eighties and nineties, tell their stories while going about their daily lives in remote Urals villages, in break-away Sukhumi, and the Moscow suburbs.

Date: December 3, 2019
Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

See:https://ceeres.uchicago.edu/content/123-film-screening-women-gulag

Feb 21, 12:30 PM: Elissa Washuta & Theresa Warburton Book Talk

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Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making lyric essays by twenty-seven contemporary Native writers from tribal nations across Turtle Island into a well-crafted basket. Shapes of Native Nonfiction features a dynamic combination of established and emerging Native writers, including Stephen Graham Jones, Deborah Miranda, Terese Marie Mailhot, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Eden Robinson, and Kim TallBear. Their ambitious, creative, and visionary work with genre and form demonstrate the slippery, shape-changing possibilities of Native stories. Considered together, they offer responses to broader questions of materiality, orality, spatiality, and temporality that continue to animate the study and practice of distinct Native literary traditions in North America.

Date: February 21, 2020
Time: 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Feb 21, 12:30 PM: Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton, "Shapes of Native ...

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Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making lyric essays by twenty-seven contemporary Native writers from tribal nations across Turtle Island into a well-crafted basket. Shapes of Native Nonfiction features a dynamic combination of established and emerging Native writers, including Stephen Graham Jones, Deborah Miranda, Terese Marie Mailhot, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Eden Robinson, and Kim TallBear. Their ambitious, creative, and visionary work with genre and form demonstrate the slippery, shape-changing possibilities of Native stories. Considered together, they offer responses to broader questions of materiality, orality, spatiality, and temporality that continue to animate the study and practice of distinct Native literary traditions in North America. Lunch will be provided. Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and a nonfiction writer. She is the author of Starvation Mode and My Body Is a Book of Rules, named a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Creative Capital, Artist Trust, 4Culture, and Potlatch Fund. Elissa is an assistant professor of creative writing at the Ohio State University. Theresa Warburton lives in Lummi, Nooksack, and Coast Salish Territories in Bellingham, WA. She is an Associate Professor of English at Western Washington University where she is also an affiliate faculty in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Canadian-American Studies. She is also the author of Other Worlds Here: Native Women’s Literatures and Contemporary Anarchist Movements, forthcoming from Northwestern University Press. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Department of Comparative Literature, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights.

Date: February 21, 2020
Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2609350362479608/

Jan 29, 4:30 PM: Lecture by Laura Lieber: “An Unholy Spectacle: The Ordeal of the Accused ...

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Laura Lieber, Duke University, will lecture on “An Unholy Spectacle: The Ordeal of the Accused Adulteress in the Early Synagogue” on Wednesday, January 29th, 4:30pm, public lecture in the Common Room. Using the trial of the accused adulteress (the sotah) from Numbers 5 as a case study, this paper argues for the inclusion of Jewish liturgical poetry as part of the classical rabbinic canon. The biblical account of the sotah, as mediated through the lens of classical rabbinic sources and synagogue literatures, displays how rabbinic writings and non-canonical Jewish sources provided fodder for liturgical and exegetical creativity. At the same time, the rabbinic and liturgical writings reveal how Jews were fully embedded in the complex and dynamic cultural milieu of Late Antiquity, and we will pay particular attention to how synagogue ritual was shaped by broader conventions of performance and emerging aesthetic conventions. Laura Suzanne Lieber is Professor of Religious Studies at Duke University, where she directs the Duke Center for Jewish Studies as well as the Elizabeth A. Clark Center for Late Ancient Studies. She holds secondary appointments in Classics, German Language and Literature, and the Duke Divinity School. A native of Fayetteville, Arkansas, Lieber received a BA in English Literature and Classics from the University of Arkansas, rabbinic ordination from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, and a PhD in the History of Judaism from the University of Chicago. Prior to coming to Duke, she was Assistant Professor of Classics and Religion at Middlebury College. Her most recent books are A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue (2014) and Jewish Aramaic Poetry from Antiquity (2018); her forthcoming volume, Classical Samaritan Poetry, will be published in 2020. She has held ACLS and National Humanities Center fellowships, and grants from the American Philosophical Society and the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture have supported her research. Her current book project, Staging the Sacred: Performance in Late Ancient Liturgical Poetry, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

Date: January 29, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Jan 9, 6:00 PM: Claire Finch - "Kathy Acker (1971-1975)"

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Claire Finch discusses "Kathy Acker (1971-1975)." A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion. Presented in partnership with The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago, the Book Office of the French Embassy in the US, and the Cultural Service at the Consulate General of France in Chicago At the Co-op About the book: This book is the first attempt to produce a critical edition of a large number of Kathy Acker’s unpublished early works. These – mostly unpublished – texts were all composed between 1969 and 1976. Yet they are representative of Acker’s published output only for the period running from 1971 to early 1974. These texts all exist as “clean” typewritten copies, probably intended to be kept, shown, maybe even published. Such a collection shows how prolific, diverse and always in-progress Acker’s production was in those years. It isn’t, however, Acker’s complete early works. More typescripts exist at the Fales Library which aren’t featured or alluded to in this book. Their publication and analysis may in the future suggest a whole new set of interpretations that will, or might not, contradict the present editor’s exegesis. Moreover, the comparison of the typescripts with manuscript versions will undoubtedly inspire new perspectives on Acker’s creative process and intentions during those years. About Claire Finch: Claire Finch is a writer and researcher based in Paris. Her hybrid practice focuses on queer poetic protocols and their possible links with feminist activism. She works primarily through her PhD research in Gender Studies at the University of Paris 8, her performative readings (festival Extra! Centre Pompidou, Le Magasin CNAC Grenoble, Mimosa House London…), and her literary piracy workshops (Khiasma Lilas, EBABX Ecole Nationale des Beaux-Arts Bordeaux…). She is a touring member of the Paris-based queer, dyke, non-binary and trans author’s collective RERQ.

Date: January 9, 2020
Time: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Jan 8, 4:30 PM: Lecture by Tzvi Novick " Gender Separation in the Literature of the ...

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A public lecture by Tzvi Novick: " Gender Separation in the Literature of the Late Antique Synagogue." Wednesday the 8th, 4:30pm, Swift Hall Common Room. Abstract: The paper examines the degree to which and the ways in which gender matters in the distribution of tropes and in the construction of narrative in synagogue literature from late antique Palestine. Bio: Tzvi Novick holds the Abrams Chair of Jewish Thought and Culture at the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on rabbinic literature and liturgical poetry from late antiquity.

Date: January 8, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Feb 11, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Agatha Slupek, “'Ours is the Overthrow of Houses': Aeschylus’ ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, February 11: “'Ours is the Overthrow of Houses': Aeschylus’ Eumenides and the Feminist Critique of Legalism” Agatha Slupek, PhD Candidate, Political Science Discussant: Demetra Kasimis, Assistant Professor of Political Science Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: February 11, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Jan 28, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Annie Heffernan, “’All That’s Left Are Damaged Kids’: Disability ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, January 28: “’All That’s Left Are Damaged Kids’: Disability Justice in the Wake of the Flint Water Crisis” Annie Heffernan, PhD Candidate, Political Science Discussant: Michele Friedner, Assistant Professor of Comparative Human Development Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: January 28, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Jan 22, 4:30 PM: Martha Feldman, “The Castrato Phantom: Masculinity and the Sacred Vernacular ...

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2020 Iris Marion Young Distinguished Faculty Lecture Martha Feldman Mabel Greene Myers Professor of Music and the Humanities in the College “The Castrato Phantom: Masculinity and the Sacred Vernacular in Twentieth-Century Rome” This paper explores what I call the sacred vernacular to puzzle out the conditions in twentieth-century Rome that mark the uncomfortable anomaly of the castrato, a man castrated for singing, the last of whom, Alessandro Moreschi, died there in 1922. The “sacred vernacular” refers to the peculiar Italian and especially Roman tendency to domesticate the sacred by means of the everyday. Among the consequences of this cultural formation is the figure of the sacred monster. The castrato is a marked instance of it, but Moreschi’s death, coincident with the rise of fascism, initiates a decades-long period of masculinist tropes and obliteration of the castrato’s memory. The most iconic elaborator of the sacred vernacular in mid-twentieth-century Rome was Federico Fellini whose films teem with boundary figures (hermaphrodites, giantesses, dwarves, and clowns) and references to the sacred in homespun contexts. A new corpus of evidence, supplied by the Moreschi family in oral interviews and family documents and borne out by archival documents, reveals a nexus of relationships between Fellini and Moreschi, mediated by Fellini’s brother on one side and Moreschi’s adopted son (a famous singing) and granddaughter on the other, whose families were joined by marriage. Outside the circles of the Moreschi and Fellini families, memory of the castrato was suppressed in Roman consciousness until experimental photographer, cineaste, and futurist Anton Giulio Bragaglia published a groundbreaking monograph on castrati in 1959. Two years later, in Divorce Italian Style, Pietro Germi offered a commentary on Moreschi in the form of a castrated chapel singer who sings one of Moreschi’s signature tunes, initiating a spate of facetious filmic references to castrati. In Germi’s joke the castrato is the seat of an angelic voice imprisoned in a deficient body, an unsettling figure who nonetheless invites desire. The paradoxical dynamic he mobilizes in others is the very one that allows Fellini’s own boundary figures to mediate between worlds sacred and everyday, human and transhuman, and to serve as figures of grace. But the capacity to mediate thus had always required a sacrificial condition. If the castrato’s particular loss was unpalatable in fascist Rome, the emplacement of his disfigured body within the church was nevertheless still a sign of the complicity between grace and sacrifice that his renunciation had always made possible. Free and open to the public.

Date: January 22, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2575732395990016/

Jan 14, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Emily Bock, “Waiting in Ball Time”

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, January 14: “Waiting in Ball Time” Emily Bock, PhD Candidate, Anthropology Discussant: C. Riley Snorton, Professor of English Language and Literature and Gender and Sexuality Studies Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: January 14, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Jan 27, 4:30 PM: Lecture by Rachel Rafael Neis: When a Woman Gives Birth to a Raven: Rabbis and ...

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Public lecture by Rachel Rafael Neis, University of Michigan: When a Woman Gives Birth to a Raven: Rabbis and the Reproduction of Species in Late Antiquity  Monday, January 27th, at 4:30pm in Swift Hall Common Room (1st floor). The biblical idea of the human as an image of God is often touted as a quintessentially Jewish, Christian, or “Judeo-Christian,” tradition. This talk traces an alternate approach to the human, one that travels through late ancient rabbinic reproductive and zoological science, and that was formed in a world of reproductive unpredictability. Ostensibly unrelated rabbinic sources – including tractates on women’s menstrual purity, animal donations to the temple, and the forbidden mixings of species – point to a rabbinic gynecology intertwined with zoology. These intertwined ideas, we will show, provide the basis for broader considerations about the coming into being of creaturely life, and the distinctions and overlaps between humans and other species. Rachel Rafael Neis holds the Jean and Samuel Frankel Chair in Rabbinics and is an associate professor appointed in History and Judaic Studies. Serving as core faculty in the Interdepartmental Program in Greek and Roman History at the University of Michigan, Neis is also affiliated faculty with the STS Program, the Institute of Research on Women and Gender, and the Department of Comparative Literature. Neis has a PhD in Jewish Studies from Harvard University, a Masters in Religious Studies from Boston University, and a law degree from the London School of Economics. Neis's first book The Sense of Sight in Rabbinic Culture: Jewish Ways of Seeing in Late Antiquity (Cambridge, 2013) won the Salon Baron Prize for best first book in Jewish Studies and an honorable mention for the Jordan Schnitzer Award. Neis's second book project is at the intersection of rabbinics, the history of ancient science, animal studies, and science studies.

Date: January 27, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Jan 30, 5:00 PM: Feminist Queer Praxis: Drag King 101

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Drag King 101 is a workshop that is focused on providing tools to tap into your inner Drag King. Local burlesque artist Po'Chop will explore the components that make up a noteworthy Drag King performance from character development, movement and physicality to costuming and beyond. Participants should wear comfortable clothes to move in. Folks of all identities and skill levels are welcome. The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action.

Date: January 30, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2479384498992901/

Jan 23, 7:00 PM: Rafiki, introduced by Erin Moore

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Bursting with the colorful street style and music of Nairobi’s vibrant youth culture, Kenyan filmmaker Wanuri Kahiu's Rafiki is a tender love story between two young women in a country that still criminalizes homosexuality. Kena and Ziki have long been told that “good Kenyan girls become good Kenyan wives,” but they yearn for something more. Despite the political rivalry between their families, the girls encourage each other to pursue their dreams in a conservative society. When love blossoms between them, Kena and Ziki must choose between happiness and safety. Initially banned in Kenya for its positive portrayal of queer romance, Rafiki won a landmark supreme court case chipping away at Kenyan anti-LGBT legislation. Featuring remarkable performances by newcomers Samantha Mugatsia and Sheila Munyiva, Rafiki is a tale of first love that Screen Daily called “reminiscent of the early work of Spike Lee.” Erin Moore of Columbia University will introduce the film and lead a discussion afterward. Anthropologist Erin Moore has been researching gender, sexuality, and feminism in Uganda since 2009, writing on subjects including miniskirt bans, development interventions for adolescent girls, love and deception in Kampala's sexual economy, and translating global feminisms. Currently based at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health, she is investigating the gendered economic history of Uganda’s HIV epidemic. Presented by the Committee on African Studies, the Film Studies Center, the Center for the Study for Gender and Sexuality, the Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideology Workshop, and the Division of Social Sciences.

Date: January 23, 2020
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

See:http://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2020/rafiki

Feb 13, 5:00 PM: Galentine’s Day Study Break

Feb 7, 12:00 PM: Care@Chicago // Come-As-You-Are Yoga with Anna Schabold

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A 60-minute, come-as-you-are, all-levels yoga session with Anna Schabold. Anna Schabold lovingly weaves together Forrest Yoga, Structural Integration Therapy, clinical Western Herbalism, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. An enthusiastic somanaut, she encourages curiosity about the mysteries within our bodies and our beings. Explore your own inner world using hands-on techniques, deep breathing, and focused attention to feeling. Anna desires to help others discover that yoga is for every body, and to help you remember your ability to feel good in your own skin, all while having a lot of fun. Our physical practice will include mindful intention setting, core strengthening, longer holds in poses, and a slower-paced flow. All levels welcome. To learn more about Anna Schabold and her practice, visit: http://www.boldlygoyoga.com/ Free and open to the public. Care@Chicago, a series organized by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, will run throughout the month of February 2020. It will feature free yoga classes on Fridays, lectures, a special Galentine's Day study break, and a workshop on midwifery.

Date: February 7, 2020
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Jan 17, 10:00 AM: GNSE Office Hours

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While you can make an appointment to talk about your major at any time, we know that sometimes it’s easier to know you can just stop in and get your answers quickly. So we’ll be holding office hours in the CSGS Community Room at least twice per quarter for any questions you might have. Get advice on upcoming courses, major/minor requirements, events or whatever else you’d like to talk about!

Date: January 17, 2020
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Feb 7, 2:00 PM: The Critical Inquiry Symposium on Climate Change: Featuring Ursula K. ...

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DESCRIPTION COMING SOON

Date: February 7, 2020
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:04 PM

Jan 23, 7:00 PM: Cinema 53: Los Graduados with Eve Ewing and director Bernardo Ruiz

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In this award-winning story of what it takes to graduate, six Latinx high schoolers from across the US describe the barriers they face while pursuing their academic goals. Threaded through their stories is the importance of civic engagement, of students becoming involved in their schools and communities, and — crucially — having a say in their own futures. Followed by conversation with Eve Ewing and director Bernardo Ruiz. (Bernardo Ruiz, 2013, 120 minutes) Harper Theater, 5238 S Harper Admission is free and open to the public. Seating is first-come, first-seated. Doors open at 6:45pm. THE GRADUATES/LOS GRADUADOS with director Bernardo Ruiz and series curator Eve L. Ewing kicks of Race and American Schools, Cinema 53's winter screening and discussion series. In this trio of documentaries, we explore the central role that race has played in the experience of schooling in America. Is education truly “the great equalizer”? Who is left out of that vision? How can education be used as a tool for liberation-- or oppression? Curated by Eve L. Ewing, assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side, the winter series brings together a researcher, a community organizer, and a filmmaker to unpack the sordid story of race and education, and imagine the future of American schooling. Bernardo Ruiz is a two-time Emmy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker and a member of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences. His latest, HARVEST SEASON, recently aired on PBS’s documentary series, Independent Lens. His directorial feature debut, REPORTERO (2013), about attacks on the press in Mexico premiered at Full Frame (U.S.), IDFA (Europe) and Ambulante (Mexico). His second feature documentary, KINGDOM OF SHADOWS (2016) premiered at SXSW in the U.S. and IDFA in Europe. In 2015, Ruiz was a filmmaker in residence at the Investigative Reporting Program at the U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. He also wrote, directed and produced Roberto Clemente (2008) which was awarded the NCLR “Alma” Award for “Outstanding Made for Television Documentary." ------------------- Cinema 53 is a screening and discussion series presenting conversation provoking films by and about women and people of color. Housed at the historic Harper Theater in downtown Hyde Park, Cinema 53 brings together scholars, artists, students and audiences from Chicago's South Side and beyond to watch films that reflect, and reflect upon, the social and economic hierarchies that structure our society. We show works across the spectrum of narrative, documentary and experimental, classics and rarities, archival to contemporary.

Date: January 23, 2020
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM