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Feb 13, 5:00 PM: Galentine’s Day Study Break

Feb 11, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Agatha Slupek, “'Ours is the Overthrow of Houses': Aeschylus’ ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, February 11: “'Ours is the Overthrow of Houses': Aeschylus’ Eumenides and the Feminist Critique of Legalism” Agatha Slupek, PhD Candidate, Political Science Discussant: Demetra Kasimis, Assistant Professor of Political Science Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: February 11, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Feb 10, 4:00 PM: Lecture by Linn Tonstand: Sexing Religion

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Linn Tonstad of Yale University Divinity School will give a public lecture, entitled "Sexing Religion" as part of our Diversity and Inclusion speaker series, which focuses on issues of race and gender in the study of religion. The lecture will take place on February 10th at 4pm, Swift Common Room (1st floor). Abstract: The study of gender and sexuality in religion often remains tied to simplistic models of symbolism, representation, and translation. As an often self-involving, sometimes justice-oriented field, the study of religion shares some important features with gender and sexuality studies. Yet scholars of religion and scholars of gender and sexuality often speak past each other in substantive and theoretical ways. What tools are needed to examine the sexed and gendered aspects of religious studies as a discipline? How do we think about the production of scholarship at the intersection of religion, gender, and sexuality, especially given the questionability of the category of religion to begin with? Using queer theological reflection as a case study, this talk considers the function of scholarly desire in the production of knowledge at the place where religion meets sex. Professor Tonstad is a constructive theologian working at the intersection of systematic theology with feminist and queer theory. Her first book, God and Difference: The Trinity, Sexuality, and the Transformation of Finitude (link is external), was published by Routledge in 2016 and was named both as a best new book in ethics and a best new book in theology in Christian Century in the spring of 2017. Her second book, Queer Theology: Beyond Apologetics (link is external)was published by Cascade in 2018. She joined the Yale Divinity School faculty in 2012 after teaching at Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University and Valparaiso University. Her teaching interests include Christian theology, queer and feminist theory, philosophy of religion, and theological method. Professor Tonstad has made contributions to various journals, including Modern Theology, International Journal of Systematic Theology, and Theology & Sexuality. She is co-chair of the Theology and Religious Reflection unit and serves on the steering committee of the Queer Studies in Religion unit of the American Academy of Religion. She is also an associate editor at Political Theology. She is currently working on her third book, tentatively titled The Impossible Other: Theology, Queer Theory, and the Temptation of Human Redemption. Event will be held in Swift Hall Common Room (1st floor).

Date: February 10, 2020
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Feb 10, 5:00 PM: Kim TallBear: Settler Love is Breaking My Heart

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TallBear provides a structural analysis of the role that settler love, sexuality, and family play in the imposition of settler-colonial private property relations.

Date: February 10, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://ccct.uchicago.edu/1920/tallbear

Feb 13, 7:00 PM: Cinema 53: The Homestretch with Gina Samuels and Eve Ewing

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With unprecedented access into the Chicago Public Schools, The Night Ministry’s Crib emergency youth shelter and Teen Living Programs’ Belfort House, THE HOMESTRETCH follows three smart, ambitious teenagers - Roque, Kasey and Anthony - as they move through the milestones of high school while navigating a landscape of couch hopping, emergency shelters, transitional homes, street families and a school system on the front lines of this crisis. The film examines the struggles these youth face in obtaining a high school level education, and then follows them beyond graduation to focus on the crucial transition when the structure of school vanishes and homeless youth struggle to find the support and community they need to survive and be independent. A powerful, original perspective on what it means to be young, homeless and building a future in America today. (Anne de Mare and Kirsten Kelly, 2014, 90 min) Followed by conversation with Eve Ewing and Gina Samuels, Associate Professor, School of Social Service Administration, UChicago. Harper Theater, 5238 S Harper Admission is free and open to the public. Seating is first-come, first-seated. Doors open at 6:45pm. THE HOMESTRETCH is part two of Race and American Schools, Cinema 53's winter screening and discussion series. In this trio of documentaries, we explore the central role that race has played in the experience of schooling in America. Is education truly “the great equalizer”? Who is left out of that vision? How can education be used as a tool for liberation-- or oppression? Curated by Eve L. Ewing, assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side, the winter series brings together a researcher, a community organizer, and a filmmaker to unpack the sordid story of race and education, and imagine the future of American schooling. Gina Miranda Samuels is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Service Administration and a Faculty Affiliate of the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture at UChicago. Her scholarly interests include transracial adoption, mixed race and multiethnic identity formation, interpretive research methods, and the development of relational, kinship, and cultural ties among young adults whose childhoods are shaped by foster care and adoption.

Date: February 13, 2020
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Feb 21, 12:30 PM: Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton, "Shapes of Native ...

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Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making lyric essays by twenty-seven contemporary Native writers from tribal nations across Turtle Island into a well-crafted basket. Shapes of Native Nonfiction features a dynamic combination of established and emerging Native writers, including Stephen Graham Jones, Deborah Miranda, Terese Marie Mailhot, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Eden Robinson, and Kim TallBear. Their ambitious, creative, and visionary work with genre and form demonstrate the slippery, shape-changing possibilities of Native stories. Considered together, they offer responses to broader questions of materiality, orality, spatiality, and temporality that continue to animate the study and practice of distinct Native literary traditions in North America. Lunch will be provided. Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and a nonfiction writer. She is the author of Starvation Mode and My Body Is a Book of Rules, named a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Creative Capital, Artist Trust, 4Culture, and Potlatch Fund. Elissa is an assistant professor of creative writing at the Ohio State University. Theresa Warburton lives in Lummi, Nooksack, and Coast Salish Territories in Bellingham, WA. She is an Associate Professor of English at Western Washington University where she is also an affiliate faculty in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Canadian-American Studies. She is also the author of Other Worlds Here: Native Women’s Literatures and Contemporary Anarchist Movements, forthcoming from Northwestern University Press. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Department of Comparative Literature, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights.

Date: February 21, 2020
Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2609350362479608/

Feb 21, 1:00 PM: GNSE Office Hours

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While you can make an appointment to talk about your major at any time, we know that sometimes it’s easier to know you can just stop in and get your answers quickly. So we’ll be holding office hours in the CSGS Community Room at least twice per quarter for any questions you might have. Get advice on upcoming courses, major/minor requirements, events or whatever else you’d like to talk about!

Date: February 21, 2020
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Feb 21, 12:30 PM: Elissa Washuta & Theresa Warburton Book Talk

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Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making lyric essays by twenty-seven contemporary Native writers from tribal nations across Turtle Island into a well-crafted basket. Shapes of Native Nonfiction features a dynamic combination of established and emerging Native writers, including Stephen Graham Jones, Deborah Miranda, Terese Marie Mailhot, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Eden Robinson, and Kim TallBear. Their ambitious, creative, and visionary work with genre and form demonstrate the slippery, shape-changing possibilities of Native stories. Considered together, they offer responses to broader questions of materiality, orality, spatiality, and temporality that continue to animate the study and practice of distinct Native literary traditions in North America.

Date: February 21, 2020
Time: 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Feb 25, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Alexander Wolfson, “Bi-Sexual Ambiguity: Psychic, Somatic Confusion in ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, February 25: “Bi-Sexual Ambiguity: Psychic, Somatic Confusion in Freud’s Three Essays” Alexander Wolfson, PhD Candidate, Philosophy of Religions Discussant: Patrick Jagoda, Professor of English Language and Literature and Cinema and Media Studies Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: February 25, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Feb 24, 4:30 PM: Lori Marso, "Dear Dick: A Feminist Politics of the Epistolary"

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Lori Marso Doris Zemurray Stone Professor of Modern Literary and Historical Studies and Professor of Political Science, Union College"Dear Dick: A Feminist Politics of the Epistolary" In this talk, I read I Love Dick, the 1997 feminist cult classic by Chris Kraus that was made into a 2016 Amazon television series directed by Jill Soloway, as an epistolary romance. Thematically, the series expresses female desire as a question of freedom and address. The story unfolds in letters that Chris writes to Dick, letters that are themselves inspired by the audacity of female desire expressed in feminist films, read by other women characters in the series, and taken up by spectators. Explicitly about female desire, but telling no clear truths, I Love Dick, I argue, is productively seen as in conversation with Simone de Beauvoir’s writing on myths about Woman in The Second Sex, as well as her work on the expression of women’s desire on screen by Brigitte Bardot in the film And God Created Woman. The questions of desire are asked here as: What if we all started writing letters to Dick? Could we be free? Lori Jo Marso is Doris Zemurray Stone Professor of Modern Literary and Historical Studies and Professor of Political Science at Union College. She is the author or editor of several books, most recently Politics with Beauvoir (2017), Politics, Theory, and Film: Critical Encounters with Lars von Trier (2016), and 51 Key Feminist Thinkers (2016). Part of the Feminism and the Radical Democratic Imaginary series. Co-sponsored by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT).

Date: February 24, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/478910716365902/

Feb 27, 5:00 PM: Feminist Queer Praxis: Call the Midwife

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Meet Cynthia Jacinthe and Sierra Ribero, UChicago nurse midwives, who will talk about the field of midwifery and the many options for students interested in women’s health care. Some of these possibilities are community/public health, research and direct care. At UChicago, midwives are advanced practice nurses who specialize in pregnancy, labor and childbirth as well as postpartum, infant and well-woman care. Nurse midwives' expertise is rooted in a philosophy of care that prioritizes evidence-based practices and customizes the birth experience to each woman's unique health needs and preferences. Numerous studies associate midwifery with highly favorable outcomes for mothers and babies. The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action.

Date: February 27, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/453840328834354/

Mar 10, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Demetra Kasimis, “Lost in Transit: Kinship, Migration, and the Traffic ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, March 10: “Lost in Transit: Kinship, Migration, and the Traffic in Women” Demetra Kasimis, Assistant Professor of Political Science Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: March 10, 2020
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Mar 9, 4:30 PM: Megan Tobias Neely, "Hedged Out: Inequality and Insecurity on Wall ...

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The rising incomes of top earners, who are mostly White men, drive current trends in widening economic inequality in the United States. I present an insider’s look at the inner workings of the notoriously rich and secretive hedge fund industry as a case study of the U.S. working rich. Drawing from in-depth interviews and field observations, I find that the industry’s White male domination and extremely high earnings are deeply intertwined. This case study captures the upper echelons of a society in which elite White masculinity has been redefined as the capacity to manage risk and uncertainty. Facing an unpredictable stock market, hedge fund workers build networks and workplaces organized around trust. In this context, bureaucracy has become understood as the force of inefficiency and patronage as the most efficient and secure way to do business. At hedge funds, patrimonialism allows a select group of mostly White men to groom and transfer capital to one another. I argue that networks of trust have returned as the fabric of enterprise in late-stage finance capitalism and that this helps to explain the gender, race, and class dimensions of widening income and wealth inequality. Megan Tobias Neely is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Women’s Leadership Innovation Lab at Stanford University and an incoming Assistant Professor in the Department of Organization at Copenhagen Business School. Her research examines rising economic inequality through the lens of gender, race, and social class. Her recent book with Ken-Hou Lin, entitled Divested: Inequality in the Age of Finance, examines how the expansion of the U.S. financial sector is a fundamental cause of rising economic inequality. She is currently writing a book on the hedge fund industry on how race, gender, and social class underpin the social fabric of the U.S. financial elite. Part of the Gender, Sexuality and Global Capitalism Project.

Date: March 9, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2592365701043636/

Mar 2, 4:30 PM: How Long Must We Wait for Liberty: A Suffragette-Style Banner Workshop with ...

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How Long Must We Wait for Liberty: A Suffragette-Style Banner Workshop with Shelby Rodeffer Monday, March 2 | 4:30-6:30pm As Women’s History Month begins and we approach the centennial of the ratification of the 19th amendment, join us for a hands-on suffragette-style banner and flag making workshop. In this two-hour workshop, Chicago-based painter and commercial artist Shelby Rodeffer will guide attendees in producing banner and flag-style signs a’la the original suffragettes, with messages reimagined to reflect the evolution of feminist public thought over the last century. In this workshop, we seek to honor the work of feminists of the first wave while incorporating the strides toward intersectionality and inclusivity made by the third and fourth wave. Free to attend, but RSVP via Eventbrite required (link below). Shelby Rodeffer is a Chicago-based painter and commercial artist. Raised in Nashville, Tennessee, she embraces signs of the human hand in both personal and professional work. Her influence comes from folk art and representational art. Shelby's most recent work deals with femininity, connection and isolation through the use of female figures, structures and letterforms. She is also fond of traditional sign making as a means of communication and as a practical form of artistic expression. Currently, Shelby can be found sign painting and participating in various public art projects. Shelby’s work can be found online at http://shelbyrodeffer.com/ and around Chicago.

Date: March 2, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/565641347360014

Apr 24, 7:00 PM: Tom + Lorenzo on “Legendary Children: The First Decade of RuPaul’s Drag ...

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A definitive deep-dive into queer history and culture with hit reality show RuPaul's Drag Race as a touchstone, by the creators of the pop culture blog Tom and Lorenzo From the singular voices behind Tom and Lorenzo comes the ultimate guide to all-things RuPaul's Drag Race and its influence on modern LGBTQ culture. Legendary Children centers itself around the idea that not only is RuPaul's Drag Race the queerest show in the history of television, but that RuPaul and company devised a show that serves as an actual museum of queer cultural and social history, drawing on queer traditions and the work of legendary figures going back nearly a century. In doing so, Drag Race became not only a repository of queer history and culture, but also an examination and illustration of queer life in the modern age. It is a snapshot of how LGBTQ folks live, struggle, work, and reach out to one another--and how they always have--and every bit of it is tied directly to Drag Race. Each chapter is an examination of a specific aspect of the show--the Werk Room, the Library, the Pit Crew, the runway, the Untucked lounge, the Snatch Game--that ties to a specific aspect of queer cultural history and/or the work of certain legendary figures in queer cultural history. About the Authors The bloggers behind the massively popular site Tom and Lorenzo , Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez offer their unique take on all things fashion and pop culture-related every day to an audience of more than seven million readers a month. They've appeared three times on Sundance Channel's All on the Line, with Joe Zee, in which Joe called them "two of the most important fashion bloggers today," made a dozen-plus appearances on Sirius XM Radio's "The Derek & Romaine Show," and have been profiled, quoted or interviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, Entertainment Weekly, People, Vanity Fair, Elle, Rolling Stone, Daily Telegraph, The Huffington Post, Slate, The Guardian, and Newsweek, among others. They live in Philadelphia. Q&A and book signing to follow. Copies of the book will be available on-site from our friends at The Seminary Co-op Bookstores. FREE and open to the public, but tickets required.

Date: April 24, 2020
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/202618250878375

Apr 13, 4:30 PM: Susila Gurusami, "Carceral Migration as Theory and Method: The ...

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In this talk, I develop a theory of carceral migration, which my coauthor and I define as the state’s use of legal punishment to force, restrict, or prevent movement of people of color. I use this theory to articulate a new framework for understanding the treatment of people policed within, at, and outside of U.S. borders. I argue that the state uses carceral migration to racially and spatially regulate people of color. Using ethnographic and photo-elicited interview data with formerly incarcerated Black women as an illustrative case, I show how the state uses carceral punishment to legally drive Black women from their homes repeatedly and legitimize their social and material dispossession. I ultimately reveal how carceral migration can shift existing anti-racist frames of carceral punishment not just theoretically, but also methodologically. Susila (Su-SEE-la) Gurusami (Gu-ru-SA-me) is an Assistant Professor of Criminology, Law, and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a sociologist of race, gender, punishment, and labor, with particular interests in carceral governance. She received her PhD in sociology from UCLA in 2017 and is a former University of California Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow. Her work has been published in Gender & Society, Social Problems, and Punishment and Society. Recognitions for this scholarship include funding and awards from the American Sociological Association, Sociologists for Women in Society, Society for the Study of Social Problems, and the Racial Democracy, Crime, and Justice Network. She is currently writing a book manuscript titled Making it Home: Race, Gender, and Carceral Migration. Part of the Gender, Sexuality and Global Capitalism Project.

Date: April 13, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1330149453835871/

Mar 12, 7:00 PM: Cinema 53: Dawnland with Heather Miller and Eve Ewing

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As recently as the 1970’s, one in four Native American children were living in non-Native foster care, adoptive homes, or boarding schools. Follow the first government-sanctioned truth and reconciliation commission in the US as it witnesses intimate, sacred moments of truth-telling and healing. With exclusive access to this groundbreaking process and never-before-seen footage, the film reveals the untold narrative of Indigenous child removal in the United States. DAWNLAND foregrounds the immense challenges that this commission faces as they work toward truth, reconciliation, and the survival of all Indigenous peoples. (Adam Mazo and Ben Pender-Cudlip, 2018) Hosted by Eve Ewing in conversation with Heather Miller, executive director of the American Indian Center in Chicago. Harper Theater, 5238 S Harper Ave, Chicago Admission is free and open to the public. Seating is first-come, first-seated. Doors open at 6:45pm. DAWNLAND is part three of Race and American Schools, Cinema 53's winter screening and discussion series. In this trio of documentaries, we explore the central role that race has played in the experience of schooling in America. Is education truly “the great equalizer”? Who is left out of that vision? How can education be used as a tool for liberation-- or oppression? Curated by Eve L. Ewing, assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago’s South Side, the winter series brings together a researcher, a community organizer, and a filmmaker to unpack the sordid story of race and education, and imagine the future of American schooling. Heather Miller is an enrolled member of the Wyandotte Nation from Oklahoma. Her passion for seeing Native American organizations succeed inspires her in her role as the current Executive Director of the American Indian Center in Chicago. She began her professional career working for Hopa Mountain in Montana where she helped Native Nonprofit organizations develop their capacity. She then worked in Seattle with Potlatch Fund, a Native American Foundation where she continued to provide capacity building trainings to Native organizations as well as teach non-Native Foundations how to work appropriately with Indian Country. She has worked to develop programs, lead organizations and direct grants of various sizes. Heather currently serves as a Board Member and Program Committee Chair for the Chicago Cultural Alliance. She holds a Bachelors of Philosophy from Miami University in Ohio and a Masters of Native American Studies from Montana State University. Heather is also a graduate of the Leadership, Apprentice, Economic and Development program through First Nations Development Fund and a graduate of the Cascade Executive Program through the University of Washington. She is also a 2019 Leaders For A New Chicago Awardee.

Starts: March 12, 2020
Ends: March 14, 2020
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Mar 10, 6:00 PM: Niizh Manidoowag (Two-Spirit) Resistance: Ryan Young

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Join us for a workshop and discussion with Ryan Young, Two Spirit Ojibwe multi-disciplinary artist from the Lac du Flambeau reservation. Their work focuses on the intersections of cultural, gender and sexual identity. Ryan is a fashion photographer for Native Max Magazine. Their most recent collaborations include contributions to an upcoming book by the American Theatre Wing and creating the latest blanket design for Two Spirit communities on behalf of Eighth Generation.

Date: March 10, 2020
Time: 6:00 PM - 6:02 PM

Mar 4, 4:30 PM: Mallika Kaur, "Faith, Gender, and Activism in the Punjab Conflict: The ...

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Mallika Kaur in conversation with Sneha Annavarapu (PhD Candidate, Sociology) on her book "Faith, Gender, and Activism in the Punjab Conflict: The Wheat Fields Still Whisper" Punjab was the arena of one of the major armed conflicts of post-colonial India. Mallika Kaur’s new book makes an urgent intervention in the history of the conflict, which to date has generally been characterized by a fixation on sensational violence—or ignored altogether. Within an already marginalized and invisiblized conflict (though up to 250,000 people died), the voices of women are/were further marginalized. This book excavates the varied and hybrid roles assumed by Sikh women; their negotiating violence and trauma amid multiple responsibilities, while defying the stereotypes of a monolithic identity. Even when the violence disproportionately targeted the male body, it provoked the policing of the female body, and succeeded in profoundly affecting the community’s entire body politic. This book highlights how attention to various forms of gendered violence—direct and indirect—is necessary to end vicious cycles in conflict and post-conflict zones. Mallika Kaur is a lawyer and writer who focuses on human rights, with a specialization in gender and minority issues. She received her Master in Public Policy from Harvard University, USA, and her Juris Doctorate from the UC Berkeley School of Law, USA, where she currently teaches.

Date: March 4, 2020
Time: 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/239992620372294/

May 27, 7:00 PM: Mrs. America Watch Party - Episode 9: Reagan

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Mrs. America tells the story of the movement to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), and the unexpected backlash led by a conservative woman named Phyllis Schlafly, aka “the sweetheart of the silent majority.” Through the eyes of the women of the era – both Schlafly and second wave feminists Gloria Steinem, Betty Friedan, Shirley Chisholm, Bella Abzug and Jill Ruckelshaus – the series explores how one of the toughest battlegrounds in the culture wars of the 70s helped give rise to the Moral Majority and forever shifted the political landscape. Join the CSGS as we watch and dish together! Episode 9: Reagan Gloria, Bella and Jill put pressure on the White House to act on their proposals from the National Women's Conference. Phyllis prepares to leverage her political victories as the 1980 presidential election draws near Optional discussion to follow. Registration is required (see link below) – we hope you can join us! If you need access to Hulu to catch up on the previous episodes, please email tbrazas@uchicago.edu.

Date: May 27, 2020
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM