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Mar 31, 9:00 AM: Mobilizing Gender: Secularism, Nation, and Remaking Europe

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The entanglement of gender, nation and secularism has become sharply visible in Europe over the last several years. Four trends underscore this phenomenon. First, there has been a mobilization of “women’s rights” talk (closely connected to “human rights”) often used to discipline – or promote – religious beliefs and practices. Second, we see the use of homophobic discourse to stigmatize liberal states, politicians and policies. Third, state efforts to manage immigration hinge on attitudes about gender and sexuality. Claims about national religious (Christian) and/or secular heritages of Europe highlight the supposed contrast to attitudes about gender and sex of migrants. Fourth, abortion debates (e.g. in Poland as well as Ireland) reveal tensions between national Christian heritages and a Europe-wide commitment to secularism and liberalism. These observations raise a number of important issues. For example, what is the role of gendered discourses and practices in enabling, sustaining, and reworking the nature of the secular-liberal state as well as its unexpected transnational alliances? Right-wing think tanks across Europe are mobilizing homophobic, anti-sex discourses and valorizing traditional gender-roles, and they are funded – cross-nationally – by both the Catholic Church and Putin’s Russia. Unexpected “bed-fellows” – one might pun. How and why does the regulation of gender/sexuality and reproduction appear to go hand-in-hand with the disciplining of religion in contemporary Europe? And what might this tell us about the changing ways that nations establish their physical and metaphorical borders/ties to the rest of Europe? This one-day conference seeks to address these questions by bringing together people whose work – theoretically, empirically, methodologically –touches upon some of the central issues at play. The cross-disciplinary discussion will feature speakers drawn from Europe and the United States, drawing from both the humanities and the social sciences. Plenary speakers are: Éric Fassin (Université de Paris 8, Sociology/Political Science) Agnieszka Graff (University of Warsaw, Literature/Gender studies) Sarah Green (University of Helsinki, Anthropology). Co-sponsored by: CEERES, 3CT, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, Department of Anthropology Lichtstern Fund, France Chicago Center, and Franke Institute for the Humanities.

Date: March 31, 2017
Time: 9:00 AM - 6:30 PM

See:https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/mobilizinggender/

Mar 29, 4:30 PM: Community Forum: Responding to Hate Speech on Campus

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Wed, Mar 29 – 4.30pm Community Forum: Responding to Hate Speech on Campus Presented by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, & Culture (CSRPC), The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights CSGS / CSRPC, Community Room 5733 S University Ave This venue is physically accessible and has a gender-neutral restroom. Please contact the CSRPC at 773.702.8063 with any questions or accommodation requests.

Date: March 29, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM

Mar 27, 4:30 PM: William J Spurlin, "Translation, Diaspora, and Queer Politics in ...

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While transnational processes, globalisation, and migratory movement continue to produce multiple forms of biopolitical domination within and across geopolitical borders, the concomitant deconstruction and delocalisation of borders is similarly producing radical transformations of political subjectivity, citizenship, and sovereignty no longer confined to the borders of the nation-state. This paper examines representations of dissident sexuality emerging in contemporary life writing, memoir, and autobiography written in French by a new generation of gay and lesbian authors from the Maghreb, where long-established traditions pertaining to sexual alterity are brought into contact with new forms of gender and sexual identity following the experience of emigration and settlement by the writers concerned in Europe. The paper analyses and interrogates issues around linguistic, cultural, and sexual difference and how selected texts by such authors as Rachid O. and Abdellah Taïa (Morocco), Eyet Chékib Djaziri (Tunisia), and Nina Bouraoui (Algeria) foreground translation and narrative reflexivity around incommensurable spaces of queerness in order to index their negotiations of multiple languages, histories, cultures, and publics. By writing in French, for example, the writers discussed are not merely mimicking the language of their former colonisers, but inflecting a European language with vocabularies and turns of phrase indigenous to North African cultures, thereby creating new possibilities of meaning and expression to name their lived experience of sexual dissidence which cannot be expressed in Arabic, indeed a form of (queer) translational praxis itself within the postcolonial frame. These highly complex translational and political strategies demonstrate that Maghrebian spaces of sexual dissidence are increasingly inflected by globally-circulating discourses and embodiments of queerness while simultaneously destabilising cultural norms around gender, sexuality, and national belonging both within North Africa and in the West. The paper concludes by addressing how migration to Europe does not necessarily bring (sexual) liberation, given that the movement from the postcolony to the West comes with a new set of borders with which to negotiate, often marked by racial and class differentials and by shifting postcolonial and post-immigration conditions prevalent in Europe today. William J Spurlin is Professor of English and Director of Teaching and Learning for Arts & Humanities at Brunel University London. Professor Spurlin has written extensively on the politics of gender and sexual dissidence and is widely known for his work in postcolonial queer studies and for examining sexuality as a significant vector of social organisation and cultural arrangement in colonial and postcolonial Africa. This event is free and open to the public.

Date: March 27, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/409096296110862/

Apr 6, 6:30 PM: Intersextionality: A Talk with Pidgeon Pagonis

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Join us for a discussion with Pidgeon Pagonis, intersex activist and filmmaker! Pidgeon will give a talk about what it means to be an intersex person of color in today’s political and social climate. The talk will be followed with a screening of the documentary, The Son I Never Had: Growing Up Intersex! Pidgeon Pagonis is an intersex activist, filmmaker, writer and artist. They’ve recently appeared in National Geographic, in a special issue titled, “Gender Revolution.” In 2015, they received the LGBT Champion of Change Award by the White House. Learn more about Pidgeon Pagonis: http://www.pidgeonismy.name/ This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to particpate in this event should contact CSGS at csgs@lists.uchicago.edu or 773.702.9936. The event is sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, the Office of LGBTQ Student Life, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, UChicago Graduate Council, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights.

Date: April 6, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1106872109458457/

Jun 7, 4:00 PM: CSRPC/CSGS Year-End BBQ

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Please join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) as we celebrate the end of the 2016-2017 school year. All are welcome!

Date: June 7, 2017
Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

May 25, 4:30 PM: Christelle Taraud, “’Native’ Women on Stirrups: Hygienic Discourse and ...

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This talk is based on a corpus of photographs representing prostitutes and published in a book on French medicine in Morocco during the 1930s. This series of images explored both the regulation of prostitution in colonial context, and the control and repression of prostitutes at the heart of hygienist discourses and racial segregation. The talk addresses in particular the violence contained in these images, from the trivialized use of naked “indigenous” to the invasive and mandatory medical inspections of prostitutes. It argues that the photographer himself participated not only to the construction of an apologetic discourse about French colonial medicine, but also to the degradation of “native” women, through the very act of photographing. As such, these images convey, just like written archives, masculine and colonial domination over prostitutes. Photography, then, constituted a key element in colonial ideology, as it helped to promote medical, moralist, and racist discourses. Professor Christelle Taraud is a historian of modern and contemporary Maghreb. Her areas of specialty include the history of women, gender, and sexualities in colonial contexts. She is a member of the Centre d’histoire du dix-neuvième siècle at the Universities of Paris I and Paris IV and the author of several monographs on the history of gender and sexuality in French North Africa, including La Prostitution coloniale. Algérie, Tunisie, Maroc, 1830-1962 (Paris Payot, 2003 and 2009); Mauresques. Femmes orientales dans la photographie coloniale (1860-1910) (Paris: Albin Michel, 2003); Femmes d’Afrique du Nord. Cartes postales (1885-1930) (Paris: Editions Bleu Autour, 2006 and 2011); and « Amour interdit ». Prostitution, marginalité et colonialisme. Maghreb 1830-1962 (Paris: Payot, collection « Petite Bibliothèque Payot », 2012). Co-sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Date: May 25, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Apr 28, 12:00 PM: The Scholar as Public Intellectual: A Conversation with Lisa Wade

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Lisa Wade, PHD, is a professor at Occidental College. She is an accomplished scholar and award-winning teacher with degrees in philosophy, human sexuality, and sociology. In her most recent book, American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex on Campus (W.W. Norton & Company; January 10, 2017), Wade looks past the shock-value news reports, moralizing op-eds, and party-saturated Hollywood movies to uncover what hookup culture means to college students, how it works, and what it reveals about privilege, power, and the future of sexuality in America. Professor Wade joins us for a lunch time conversation on public sociology. RSVPs not required, but appreciated to tbrazas@uchicago.edu

Date: April 28, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Apr 26, 4:30 PM: Daisy Delogu, “Allegory Today”

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2017 Iris Marion Young Distinguished Faculty Lecture Daisy Delogu Professor of French Chair, Dept. of Romance Languages & Literatures"Allegory Today" What is allegory, and why should we care about it? From our alma maters to lady liberty, allegorical figures are all around us, though we rarely think about them, or the power they exert over the imaginary. In my talk I will discuss the practice of allegory in the medieval literature that I know best, the relationship of allegory to gender, the power that allegorical thinking wields in the world today, as well as the potential for resistance that it offers.

Date: April 26, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

May 11, 4:30 PM: Deborah Gould, “Becoming Coalitional: The Perverse Encounter of Queer to the ...

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2017 Distinguished Alumni Lecture Deborah Gould, PhD '00 “Becoming Coalitional: The Perverse Encounter of Queer to the Left and the Jesus People USA” In this talk I consider a Chicago low-cost housing coalition that included a group of secular queer leftists and an evangelical Christian group. Strikingly, difference here was both pronounced and a non-event: the two groups never confronted each other about homosexuality or their widely divergent cosmologies. I use this case of affinities across chasms of perceived difference to explore coalitions as contact zones, analyzing in particular what desires, capacities, and potentialities a coalition might generate and nourish. Interested in political appetite and the not-yet of politics, the talk traverses a number of themes including: convergence without unity; hopes generated through surprising encounters; a longing to live belonging differently; and desire for activism that holds out the possibility of being changed. Deborah Gould is an associate professor of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz (and affiliated faculty in Feminist Studies, History of Consciousness, and Politics). She received her PhD from the University of Chicago in Political Science in 2000 and was a post-doctoral Harper-Schmidt Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at the University of Chicago, 2000 – 2004. Her first book, Moving Politics: Emotion and ACT UP’s Fight Against AIDS (University of Chicago Press, 2009) won the Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Best Book Award from the American Sociological Association’s Political Sociology Section (2010), the Ruth Benedict Book Prize from the American Anthropological Association (2010), and was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies (2010). She is currently working on a second book, also about political emotion, called Emotional Terrains of Activism: Appetites, Encounters, and the Not-Yet of Politics. She was involved in ACT UP/Chicago for many years, and later in Queer to the Left, and was a founding member of the research/art/activism collaborative group, Feel Tank Chicago, most famous for its International Parades of the Politically Depressed.

Date: May 11, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Apr 15, 8:00 AM: Engendering Change | Conference

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In 2017, Northwestern is hosting the Engendering Change Graduate Student Conference. The purpose of this conference is to provide a space for graduate students working on research in gender and sexuality, with a focus this year on racial and gender justice, to present their work, get feedback from faculty and other graduate students, and network. Engendering Change is an annual conference that rotates host locations between University of Illinois at Chicago, Northwestern University, and University of Chicago. Saturday, April 15th: Conference (University Hall 201) 8:00 – 8:45 AM: Breakfast 9:00 – 10:30: Panel 1 – Precarity in the Current Political Moment: Where are we now? Chris Russell, (Northwestern): “‘You’re Messing with meme Magic:’ Trump Memes, the Alt-Right, and Online Political Discourse” E . Jax Witzig, (DePaul): “The ‘Femme Phenomenon:’ (Mis)using Terminology to Locate the Genderqueer Self” Andrea Ford, (U Chicago): “(Anti)Institutional Menses: Our Blood, Our Business” Shana Bahemat, (DePaul): “Exploring Vulnerability and Trauma in the Iranian Diaspora 10:45 – 12:15: Panel 2 – Producing Precarity: Institutionalizing Forms of Knowledge Aaron Clarke, (Northwestern): “Ontological Precarity: Racial Discipline at the Ends of the University” Malia Bowers, (Northwestern): “Feminist Sickness and Temporal Orientations: A Nietzchean Interpretation” Becky Bivens, (UIC): “The V-Girls: Political Conviction and Group Action after Post-Structuralism” 12:15 – 1:15 PM: Lunch (provided) 1:15 – 2:45: Panel 3 – State, Structures, and Stigma: Policy Implications Sameena Azhar, (U Chicago): “Postcolonial Feminist Interpretations of HIV Stigma among Hijras/Transgender Women Living with HIV in Hyderabad, India” Cal Lee Garrett, (UIC): “(Institutional) Barrier Methods: HIV/AIDS Public Health, LGBTQ Community, and the Myth of Safe Sex” Madeleine Pape, (UW Madison): “Gendered Expertise and the Institutional Reproduction of Sex Difference” Alysia Carey and Jenn M Jackson, (U Chicago): “Queering Black Freedom: Black mothering under state repression in the African Diaspora” 3:00 – 4:30: Panel 4 – Mapping Precarity: The Making of Spaces, Places, and Worlds Sarah Scriven, (DePaul): “Pauli Murray as a Black Eccentric Performer: History and Queer World Making” Meagan McChesney, (Loyola Chicago): “Exhibiting Sovereignty: Tribal Museums in Great Lakes Region, 1975-2010” Lauren Dean, (UIC): “Gender, informality, and unmapping with the Mumbai Suburban Rail System” 5:00 – 6:30 PM: Conference Roundtable (University Hall 201) For a full schedule of events and directions to the Northwestern campus, visit http://sites.northwestern.edu/engenderingchange2017/

Date: April 15, 2017
Time: 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM

See:http://sites.northwestern.edu/engenderingchange2017/

Apr 14, 5:15 PM: Engendering Change | Keynote Talk: Alexis Pauline Gumbs, "“How We ...

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In 2017, Northwestern is hosting the Engendering Change Graduate Student Conference. The purpose of this conference is to provide a space for graduate students working on research in gender and sexuality, with a focus this year on racial and gender justice, to present their work, get feedback from faculty and other graduate students, and network. Engendering Change is an annual conference that rotates host locations between University of Illinois at Chicago, Northwestern University, and University of Chicago. Friday, April 14th 5:15 PM: Keynote Talk, Alexis Pauline Gumbs (University Hall 102) “How We Know: The Black Feminist Pragmatic Intergenerational Sphere” Alexis Pauline Gumbs describes herself as a queer black troublemaker, a black feminist love evangelist and a prayer poet priestess. Dr. Gumbs has a PhD in English, African and African-American Studies, and Women and Gender Studies from Duke University. She was the first scholar to research the Audre Lorde P apers at Spelman College, the June Jordan Papers at Harvard University, and the Lucille Clifton Papers at Emory University during her dissertation research. Talk to be followed by reception and book signing with Dr. Gumbs (University Hall 201) For a full schedule of events and directions to the Northwestern campus, visit http://sites.northwestern.edu/engenderingchange2017/

Date: April 14, 2017
Time: 5:15 PM - 6:45 PM

See:http://sites.northwestern.edu/engenderingchange2017/

Apr 12, 12:00 PM: Lunch Workshop: Animal-Assisted Therapy

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Learn more about animal-assisted therapy with Ann Davidson of Canine Therapy Corps and certified therapy dog Rocko! Canine Therapy Corps provides self-initiated, goal directed therapy activities using trained and tested therapy dogs conducted in a group setting according to specific therapy goals. In this presentation, we will discuss: - What animal-assisted therapy is, and how it differs from animal-assisted activities as well as service animals; - Various applications of animal-assisted therapy; and - Suggestions on how to set up and run your own animal-assisted therapy program Lunch will be provided. Please contact tbrazas@uchicago.edu with any dietary restrictions. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact CSGS at csgs@lists.uchicago.edu or 773.702.9936. Co-sponsored by the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration.

Date: April 12, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:20 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/392138757836755/

Apr 3, 5:30 PM: Dean Spade, "Survival and Resistance: Trans Politics, Racial Justice, ...

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Join us for a conversation about the current political moment and challenges facing trans people, undocumented people and the connections between the struggles around migrant justice and trans justice. Trans activist, writer and teacher, Dean Spade is an Associate Professor at the Seattle University School of Law. He is the founder of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, a non-profit collective that provides free legal help to low-income people and people of color who are trans, intersex and/or gender non-conforming and works to build trans resistance rooted in racial and economic justice. Sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Student Life, Student Support Services, and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

Date: April 3, 2017
Time: 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/196818760815894/

May 8, 4:30 PM: Gender and Power in the Middle Ages

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This conference brings together scholars who are among those currently doing the most exciting and ground-breaking work on the problem of the relationship between gender and power in the medieval world in a workshop-like setting, to discuss the state of the field. Each speaker will have a fifty-minute session, which they will structure as they wish: they may choose to deliver a paper and leave time for questions, or they may present a pre-circulated primary source, paper, work-in-progress, or theoretical piece about which they can lead a discussion. Topics addressed include: the role of charisma and personality; the use of rhetorics of sexuality; power and cultural production; power and human reproduction; friendship and power, and the role human networks play in the deployment of power. Our approach is multi-disciplinary, drawing from work in History, Literature, and Art History. Our goal is to move beyond the excellent descriptive work that has been done in recent years on the subject of gender and power in order to develop new frameworks and models. Monday, May 8 4:30pm Theresa Earenfight (Seattle U): Volatile, Fragile, and Unstable: Illusions of Women and Power 5:30pm Reception Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Nicholson Center for British Studies, and the Franke Institute.

Date: May 8, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

See:https://voices.uchicago.edu/genderpower/

Apr 4, 4:30 PM: Susan Burns, "Human Rights, Biological Citizenship, and Reproductive ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop's Spring Quarter schedule is curated by Susan Burns, Associate Professor of Japanese History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, with outside guest Leslie Reagan, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. This quarter's theme, "Transnational Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality," explores the historical dimensions of gender, sexuality, and feminism with an emphasis on work that is transnational or comparative in perspective. April 4: Susan Burns, Associate Professor of History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago, "Human Rights, Biological Citizenship, and Reproductive Policy in Japan's Leprosy Sanitaria" Abstract: In May 2001, a local court in Kumamoto Japan issued a ruling that both jurists and journalists would later term "epochal." It held that the Japanese government had infringed upon the human and civil rights of the Japanese leprosy sufferers who were confined within the public and national sanitaria and it required the state to pay reparations. The subsequent announcement by the Japanese government that it would not appeal the court's decision and would enter into negotiations with former patients over a settlement was widely celebrated by progressive groups, who had seen other human rights cases, including those brought by so-called "comfort women," former POWs, and victims of biological warfare, end in failure. At the center of the suit heard by the Kumamoto Court was the charge that the Japanese state had required that male patients submit to sterilization and coerced female patients who became pregnant to undergo abortion, policies that many have argued reflect the prewar state's biopolitical concerns. In this presentation, I explore the reproductive policies deployed in the sanitaria in light of the politics of sexuality and gender and Rose and Nova's theory of "biological citizenship." Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality

Date: April 4, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

May 9, 8:30 AM: Gender and Power in the Middle Ages

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This conference brings together scholars who are among those currently doing the most exciting and ground-breaking work on the problem of the relationship between gender and power in the medieval world in a workshop-like setting, to discuss the state of the field. Each speaker will have a fifty-minute session, which they will structure as they wish: they may choose to deliver a paper and leave time for questions, or they may present a pre-circulated primary source, paper, work-in-progress, or theoretical piece about which they can lead a discussion. Topics addressed include: the role of charisma and personality; the use of rhetorics of sexuality; power and cultural production; power and human reproduction; friendship and power, and the role human networks play in the deployment of power. Our approach is multi-disciplinary, drawing from work in History, Literature, and Art History. Our goal is to move beyond the excellent descriptive work that has been done in recent years on the subject of gender and power in order to develop new frameworks and models. Tuesday, May 9 8:30am Breakfast 9:00am Miriam Shadis (Ohio U): Ivanka You Sit Right Here, or, The Three Teresas: mothers, daughters, proxy wives and legitimizing the state in early Portugal 10:00am Simon Doubleday (Hofstra): “Fine word, ‘legitimate’!” A natural daughter in thirteenth-century Iberia 11:00 Jennifer Thibodeaux (UW Whitewater): Masculinity, power and crisis in late medieval Normandy 12:00pm Lunch 1:30pm Valerie Garver (NIU): Gender, Textiles, and the Carolingian Imperial Title 2:30pm Cecily Hilsdale (McGill): Byzantine Things and the Aspirations of Sovereignty: Gender, Power, and Materiality 3:30-3:45pm Break 3:45pm Sean Gilsdorf (Harvard): Six Authors in Search of a Character: Brunhild and Gendered Power 4:45pm Irina Dumitrescu (Bonn): Ambivalent Charisma: Power, Vulnerability, and Legendary Women Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Nicholson Center for British Studies, and the Franke Institute.

Date: May 9, 2017
Time: 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM

See:https://voices.uchicago.edu/genderpower/

May 11, 4:30 PM: Deborah Gould, “Becoming Coalitional: The Perverse Encounter of Queer to the ...

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2017 Distinguished Alumni Lecture Deborah Gould, PhD '00 “Becoming Coalitional: The Perverse Encounter of Queer to the Left and the Jesus People USA” In this talk I consider a Chicago low-cost housing coalition that included a group of secular queer leftists and an evangelical Christian group. Strikingly, difference here was both pronounced and a non-event: the two groups never confronted each other about homosexuality or their widely divergent cosmologies. I use this case of affinities across chasms of perceived difference to explore coalitions as contact zones, analyzing in particular what desires, capacities, and potentialities a coalition might generate and nourish. Interested in political appetite and the not-yet of politics, the talk traverses a number of themes including: convergence without unity; hopes generated through surprising encounters; a longing to live belonging differently; and desire for activism that holds out the possibility of being changed. Deborah Gould is an associate professor of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz (and affiliated faculty in Feminist Studies, History of Consciousness, and Politics). She received her PhD from the University of Chicago in Political Science in 2000 and was a post-doctoral Harper-Schmidt Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at the University of Chicago, 2000 – 2004. Her first book, Moving Politics: Emotion and ACT UP’s Fight Against AIDS (University of Chicago Press, 2009) won the Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Best Book Award from the American Sociological Association’s Political Sociology Section (2010), the Ruth Benedict Book Prize from the American Anthropological Association (2010), and was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Studies (2010). She is currently working on a second book, also about political emotion, called Emotional Terrains of Activism: Appetites, Encounters, and the Not-Yet of Politics. She was involved in ACT UP/Chicago for many years, and later in Queer to the Left, and was a founding member of the research/art/activism collaborative group, Feel Tank Chicago, most famous for its International Parades of the Politically Depressed.

Date: May 11, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Jun 7, 4:00 PM: CSRPC/CSGS Year-End BBQ

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Please join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) as we celebrate the end of the 2016-2017 school year. All are welcome!

Date: June 7, 2017
Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

May 25, 4:30 PM: Christelle Taraud, “’Native’ Women on Stirrups: Hygienic Discourse and ...

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This talk is based on a corpus of photographs representing prostitutes and published in a book on French medicine in Morocco during the 1930s. This series of images explored both the regulation of prostitution in colonial context, and the control and repression of prostitutes at the heart of hygienist discourses and racial segregation. The talk addresses in particular the violence contained in these images, from the trivialized use of naked “indigenous” to the invasive and mandatory medical inspections of prostitutes. It argues that the photographer himself participated not only to the construction of an apologetic discourse about French colonial medicine, but also to the degradation of “native” women, through the very act of photographing. As such, these images convey, just like written archives, masculine and colonial domination over prostitutes. Photography, then, constituted a key element in colonial ideology, as it helped to promote medical, moralist, and racist discourses. Professor Christelle Taraud is a historian of modern and contemporary Maghreb. Her areas of specialty include the history of women, gender, and sexualities in colonial contexts. She is a member of the Centre d’histoire du dix-neuvième siècle at the Universities of Paris I and Paris IV and the author of several monographs on the history of gender and sexuality in French North Africa, including La Prostitution coloniale. Algérie, Tunisie, Maroc, 1830-1962 (Paris Payot, 2003 and 2009); Mauresques. Femmes orientales dans la photographie coloniale (1860-1910) (Paris: Albin Michel, 2003); Femmes d’Afrique du Nord. Cartes postales (1885-1930) (Paris: Editions Bleu Autour, 2006 and 2011); and « Amour interdit ». Prostitution, marginalité et colonialisme. Maghreb 1830-1962 (Paris: Payot, collection « Petite Bibliothèque Payot », 2012). Co-sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies

Date: May 25, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

May 2, 4:30 PM: Michaela Appeltova, “Aesthetic Surgery for the Masses: Beauty and Kulturnost ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop's Spring Quarter schedule is curated by Susan Burns, Associate Professor of Japanese History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, with outside guest Leslie Reagan, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. This quarter's theme, "Transnational Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality," explores the historical dimensions of gender, sexuality, and feminism with an emphasis on work that is transnational or comparative in perspective. May 2nd: “Aesthetic Surgery for the Masses: Beauty and Kulturnost of the Body” Michaela Appeltova, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Chicago Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality

Date: May 2, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/