Quantcast
Channel: Gender Studies Events
Mark channel Not-Safe-For-Work? cancel confirm NSFW Votes: (0 votes)
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel.
0

Apr 28, 3:00 PM: Pervasive Play: Make Believe as Method

0
0
In this talk, Kari Kraus explores the role and implications of metalepsis for pervasive game design and mixed-method research. Adopting a case study approach, Kraus will introduce DUST, an educational alternate reality game (ARG) for teens that ran live for 10 weeks in early 2015. A joint endeavor between Brigham Young University and the University of Maryland in partnership with NASA and Tinder Transmedia, DUST created many open channels for players to react to and experiment with metalepsis. They created social networks that included both real people and fictional characters; moved back and forth between fictional and scientific inquiry; invoked the fictional status of the game from within the game; and responded to questionnaires administered by both academic researchers and fictional characters. From the vantage point of research, this push-pull relationship between the imaginary and the real presents unique challenges and opportunities for data collection and analysis, learning assessment, and knowledge transfer. Throughout the talk, Kraus will highlight gender differences associated with how players shape, experience, and negotiate metaleptic structures. Although metalepsis is generally understood as an aesthetic phenomenon, she will conclude by briefly examining its larger social, psychological, and civic import. Kari's bio is the following: Kari Kraus is an associate professor in the College of Information Studies and the Department of English at the University of Maryland. Her research and teaching interests focus on new media and the digital humanities, digital preservation, game studies and transmedia storytelling, and speculative design. She was a local Co-PI on two grants for preserving virtual worlds; the PI on an IMLS Digital Humanities Internship grant; and, with Derek Hansen, the Co-Principal Investigator of an NSF grant to study Alternate Reality Games (ARGs) and transmedia storytelling in the service of education and design. Her latest transmedia work—in partnership with Brigham Young University, Tinder Transmedia, and the Computer History Museum--is likewise funded by the NSF. With Min Wu and Doug Oard, she Co-PIed “Exploring Invisible Traces in Historic Recordings,” a project that applied audio forensics techniques to help recover provenance information about undated recordings. Kraus has written for the New York Times and the Huffington Post, and her work has been mentioned in the Atlantic, Baltimore Public Radio, The Salt Lake Tribune, Huffington Post, Gamasutra, Wired, and the Long Now Foundation. In 2015 she entered into a Space Act Agreement with NASA. She is writing a book about how artists, designers, and humanities researchers think about, model, and design possible futures. Presented by the Alternate Realities and Virtual Worlds Project.

Date: April 28, 2017
Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1135614136548377/

Apr 18, 12:00 PM: Shatema Threadcraft, “How to Write On Kinky Hair: Choice, Cultural ...

0
0
Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop's Spring Quarter schedule is curated by Susan Burns, Associate Professor of Japanese History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, with outside guest Leslie Reagan, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. This quarter's theme, "Transnational Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality," explores the historical dimensions of gender, sexuality, and feminism with an emphasis on work that is transnational or comparative in perspective. April 18th: “How to Write On Kinky Hair: Choice, Cultural Inscription and Embodied Black Femininity” Shatema Threadcraft, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Rutgers University ***Cosponsored with the Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideologies Workshop. Please note that this workshop will be held from 12:00-1:20pm in the Amandla Lounge on the 3rd floor the Center for Identity and Inclusion, 5710 S. Woodlawn Avenue*** Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality

Date: April 18, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:20 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

May 16, 4:30 PM: Daniel Majchrowicz, Title TBA

0
0
Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop's Spring Quarter schedule is curated by Susan Burns, Associate Professor of Japanese History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, with outside guest Leslie Reagan, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. This quarter's theme, "Transnational Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality," explores the historical dimensions of gender, sexuality, and feminism with an emphasis on work that is transnational or comparative in perspective. May 16th: Title TBD Daniel Majchrowicz, Assistant Professor of South Asian Literature and Culture, Northwestern University Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality

Date: May 16, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

May 17, 12:00 PM: Sonia C. Gomez, “Brides and Bachelors and the Making of Japanese ...

0
0
Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop's Spring Quarter schedule is curated by Susan Burns, Associate Professor of Japanese History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, with outside guest Leslie Reagan, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. This quarter's theme, "Transnational Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality," explores the historical dimensions of gender, sexuality, and feminism with an emphasis on work that is transnational or comparative in perspective. May 17th: “Brides and Bachelors and the Making of Japanese America" Sonia C. Gomez, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Chicago ***Cosponsored by the Migration and Incorporation Workshop. Please note that this session will be held from 12:00-1:20 in the Social Sciences Tea Room*** Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality

Date: May 17, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:20 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

May 25, 4:30 PM: Christelle Taraud, “’Native’ Women on Stirrups: Hygienic Discourse and ...

0
0
This talk is based on a corpus of photographs representing prostitutes and published in a book on French medicine in Morocco during the 1930s. This series of images explored both the regulation of prostitution in colonial context, and the control and repression of prostitutes at the heart of hygienist discourses and racial segregation. The talk addresses in particular the violence contained in these images, from the trivialized use of naked “indigenous” to the invasive and mandatory medical inspections of prostitutes. It argues that the photographer himself participated not only to the construction of an apologetic discourse about French colonial medicine, but also to the degradation of “native” women, through the very act of photographing. As such, these images convey, just like written archives, masculine and colonial domination over prostitutes. Photography, then, constituted a key element in colonial ideology, as it helped to promote medical, moralist, and racist discourses. Professor Christelle Taraud is a historian of modern and contemporary Maghreb. Her areas of specialty include the history of women, gender, and sexualities in colonial contexts. She is a member of the Centre d’histoire du dix-neuvième siècle at the Universities of Paris I and Paris IV and the author of several monographs on the history of gender and sexuality in French North Africa, including La Prostitution coloniale. Algérie, Tunisie, Maroc, 1830-1962 (Paris Payot, 2003 and 2009); Mauresques. Femmes orientales dans la photographie coloniale (1860-1910) (Paris: Albin Michel, 2003); Femmes d’Afrique du Nord. Cartes postales (1885-1930) (Paris: Editions Bleu Autour, 2006 and 2011); and « Amour interdit ». Prostitution, marginalité et colonialisme. Maghreb 1830-1962 (Paris: Payot, collection « Petite Bibliothèque Payot », 2012). Co-sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture.

Date: May 25, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Jun 7, 4:00 PM: CSRPC/CSGS Year-End BBQ

0
0
Please join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) as we celebrate the end of the 2016-2017 school year. All are welcome!

Date: June 7, 2017
Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

May 30, 4:30 PM: Caterina Fugazzola, “Change Without Protest: Discursive Strategies of LGBT ...

0
0
Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop's Spring Quarter schedule is curated by Susan Burns, Associate Professor of Japanese History and East Asian Languages and Civilizations, with outside guest Leslie Reagan, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. This quarter's theme, "Transnational Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality," explores the historical dimensions of gender, sexuality, and feminism with an emphasis on work that is transnational or comparative in perspective. May 30th: “Change Without Protest: Discursive Strategies of LGBT Groups in Mainland China” Caterina Fugazzola, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality

Date: May 30, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

May 25, 5:30 PM: Grief as Resistance: Racialized State Violence and the Politics of Black ...

0
0
Join us for a transnational conversation with Black mothers who have lost children to state violence. Mother-activists from the US, Brazil, and Colombia share their struggles and strategies of resistance against police violence, mass incarceration, and the unrelenting injustices facing Black communities around the world. This event was organized by Yanilda María González, Assistant Professor at SSA and Jaime Alves, Assistant Professor at the College of Staten Island. Speakers: Railda Alves, Associação AMPARAR, Brazil María Ligia Castillo Cortés, Casa Cultural El Chontaduro, Colombia Débora da Silva, Mães de Maio, Brazil Dorothy Holmes, Mother of Ronald Johnson Geneva Reed-Veal, Mother of Sandra Bland Maria Eugenia Velásquez, Mujeres de Bojayá, Colombia Light refreshments will be served. Free and open to the public. For more information, please contact: Claudia at cgiribaldi@uchicago.edu. Carmella at csnook@uchicago.edu. Sponsored by: Center for Latin American Studies Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture Centro de Estudios Afrodiaspóricos-Universidad Icesi Charlotte Towle Memorial Endowment Fund Chicago Center for Youth Violence Prevention Pozen Family Center for Human Rights School of Social Service Administration UChicago Urban

Date: May 25, 2017
Time: 5:30 PM

May 16, 4:30 PM: Lecture by Deborah Nelson: 'A Defense of Coldness'

0
0
The Karla Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture is pleased to present a lecture by Deborah Nelson upon the publication of her book “Tough Enough: Arbus, Arendt, Didion, McCarthy, Sontag, Weil.”

Date: May 16, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Jun 3, 2:30 PM: Alumni Weekend 2017: "To Be or Not to Be: What It Means to Be a ...

0
0
Adom Getachew, Neubauer Family Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and the College Kristin Maschka, AB'91, AM'93, Author, Activist, Speaker, and Consultant Em Hall, AB'01, Marketing and Communications Consultant Join the Chicago Women's Alliance for a panel and discussion of what it means to be (or not to be) a feminist in 2017. The conversation will provide a historical perspective on feminism and the implications of modern feminism on education and politics.

Date: June 3, 2017
Time: 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

See:http://alumniweekend.uchicago.edu/events

Jun 3, 1:00 PM: Alumni Weekend 2017: LGBTQ Human Rights Lecture - Subhi Nahas

0
0
Join the LGBT Alumni Network and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality for a discussion with Subhi Nahas--a Syrian refugee and LGBT human rights activist who has addressed the United Nations Security Council--and prominent UChicago scholars and professionals who have made significant contributions toward furthering LGBT human rights.

Date: June 3, 2017
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

See:http://alumniweekend.uchicago.edu/events

Apr 14, 9:00 AM: Engendering Change 2018

0
0
Engendering Change is an annual graduate student organized conference focused on issues of gender and sexuality. The day-long conference rotates host locations between the University of Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Northwestern University; the conference will be held at the University of Chicago on Saturday, April 14 in 2018. Engendering Change provides a space for graduate students working on research in gender and sexuality to present their work, get feedback from faculty and other graduate students, and network. Details TBA.

Date: April 14, 2018
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Nov 18, 7:00 PM: An Evening at Chez Nous

0
0
For fifty years, the West Berlin cabaret Chez Nous was a star-studded dance club, visited by celebrities and featured in Hollywood films. Chez Nous celebrated the artistry of female impersonators and trans women, including Coccinelle, the first French trans woman to legally change her name following gender confirmation surgery; Ricky Reneé, a drag performer who played Elke in Cabaret (1972); and Chicago’s own Marlow La Fantastique, an internationally acclaimed performer now residing in Bronzeville in her retirement. An Evening at Chez Nous brings that history alive with a cabaret-inspired event including clips of the cabaret’s revue from the 1970s, scenes from films set at the nightclub starring Michael Caine and Omar Sharif, Chicago dancer Darling Shear recreating Marlow’s fan dance, and Marlow La Fantastique herself, sharing her stories and memories of the famous dance club. Raised in Bronzeville, Marlow La Fantastique began performing in Chicago, winning grand prizes at drag balls before moving to New York City in the 1960s. There, she joined the House of La Beija, spent time at Stonewall, performed at the Jewel Box, and competed as Miss Chicago in the drag pageant featured in the cult classic documentary The Queen (1968). Encouraged by her friends to explore Europe, she moved to Berlin and ended up performing at Chez Nous, hired on the spot because of her resemblance to Josephine Baker. After working in Berlin for years, Marlow continued performing internationally in Indonesia and elsewhere, finally returning to Chicago, where she and her husband live in Bronzeville. Darling Shear has worked with choreographers including Bubba Carr, Rhonda Henriksen, Tracy Vogt, and Hinton Battle, and founded her own collaborative company, Suna Dance. In Chicago, she has worked with The Fly Honeys of The Inconvenience, apprenticed with the Cerqua Rivera Dance Theatre, and regularly performs at Salonathon and other queer arts spaces. Working with the Neo-Futurists, she specialized in recreating historical dance numbers from musicals from the 1920s through the 1970s. Curated by Nicole Morse (CMS) as part of the Film Studies Center’s Graduate Student Curatorial Program. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, and the Student Fine Arts Fund.

Date: November 18, 2017
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

See:https://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2017/evening-chez-nous

Nov 7, 5:00 PM: What Can the Law do for LGBT Rights? A conversation with ACLU's Chase Strangio

0
0
Please join us for a conversation with Chase Strangio about the role of the law in shaping public conversations about trans bodies and lives and the constraints and possibilities inherent in advocacy strategies and narratives. Chase Strangio is a staff attorney with ACLU's LGBT and HIV Project. As a voice at the forefront of litigation and public debate about recently-released political prisoner Chelsea Manning, and current high-school student Gavin Grimm – the lead plaintiff in the trans student case taken to the U.S. Supreme Court – Strangio is a frequent guest on Democracy Now! and National Public Radio, and contributor to Huffington Post and Slate. Chase is also currently co-counsel in the ACLU's lawsuit against President Trump's ban on transgender individuals in the military and in the organization's lawsuit against North Carolina's infamous anti-trans laws, HB2 and HB142. Part of the Contexts of Coalition project of the CSGS.

Date: November 7, 2017
Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Oct 23, 5:00 PM: Sarah Schulman, "Conflict Is Not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community ...

0
0
Sarah Schulman discusses her Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Non-Fiction winning book, "Conflict Is Not Abuse: Overstating Harm, Community Responsibility, and the Duty of Repair." From intimate relationships to global politics, Sarah Schulman observes a continuum: that inflated accusations of harm are used to avoid accountability. Illuminating the difference between Conflict and Abuse, Schulman directly addresses our contemporary culture of scapegoating. This deep, brave, and bold work reveals how punishment replaces personal and collective self-criticism, and shows why difference is so often used to justify cruelty and shunning. Rooting the problem of escalation in negative group relationships, Schulman illuminates the ways in which cliques, communities, families, and religious, racial, and national groups bond through the refusal to change their self-concept. She illustrates how Supremacy behaviour and Traumatized behaviour resemble each other, through a shared inability to tolerate difference. This important and sure to be controversial book brings insight into contemporary and historical issues of personal, racial and geo-political difference, as tools of escalation towards injustice, exclusion and punishment, whether the objects of dehumanization are other individuals in our families or communities, African Americans at the hands of police, people with HIV, and Palestinians. Conflict Is Not Abuse is a searing rejection of the cultural phenomenon of blame, cruelty, and scapegoating, revealing how those in positions of power exacerbate and manipulate fear of the "other" to avoid facing themselves. Sarah Schulman is a novelist, nonfiction writer, playwright, screenwriter, journalist and AIDS historian, and the author of eighteen books. A Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, Sarah is a Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at the City University of New York, College of Staten Island. Her novels published by Arsenal include Rat Bohemia, Empathy, After Delores, and The Mere Future. She lives in New York. Free and open to the public.

Date: October 23, 2017
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Oct 20, 12:00 PM: Joan Scott, "Free Speech and Academic Freedom"

0
0
Joan Scott received her PhD in History from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She has taught at the University of Illinois, Chicago; Northwestern University; the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and Brown University, where she was the founding director of the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women. Since 1985, she has been a professor in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University. Joan Scott's work has challenged the foundations of conventional historical practice, including the nature of historical evidence and historical experience. Drawing on a range of philosophical thought, as well as on a rethinking of her own training as a labor historian, she has contributed to the formulation of a field of critical history. Written more than twenty years ago, her now classic article, "Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis," continues to inspire innovative research on women and gender. In her latest work she has been concerned with the ways in which difference poses problems for democratic practice. She has taken up this question in her recent books: Only Paradoxes to Offer: French Feminists and the Rights of Man (1996); Parité: Sexual Equality and the Crisis of French Universalism (2005); and The Politics of the Veil (2007). She has extended her work on the veil to examine the relationship between secularism and gender equality. She has also prepared a collection of her essays that deals with the uses of psychoanalysis, particularly fantasy, for historical interpretation, The Fantasy of Feminist History (2011). Scott is a founding editor of History of the Present, a journal of theoretically-informed history. Scott has been recognized with honorary degrees from a number of academic institutions, including Brown, Harvard, and the University of Bergen (Norway). In May, 2009, she received an honorary doctorate from the University of Wisconsin–where she earned her PhD. Several of Scott’s books have won prizes from the American Historical Association, which also awarded her the Nancy Lyman Roelker prize for graduate mentoring in 1995. At its meeting in January, 2009, the AHA presented her with an award for Scholarly Distinction, the culmination of more than 40 years of research and writing in her chosen fields of French history, women’s and gender history, and feminist theory. In June 2012, Scott received an honorary doctorate from Princeton University.

Date: October 20, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Oct 4, 4:30 PM: 5733 Open House

0
0
Please join The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture for an open house to kick off the 2017-2018 school year. Light fare and drinks will be provided. All are welcome!

Date: October 4, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/266159477235890/

Sep 28, 7:00 PM: The Combahee River Collective Mixtape: Black Feminist Sonic Dissent Then ...

0
0
This multimedia presentation kicks off Ripples and Waves, 4-part a series of programs observing the 40th anniversary of the Combahee River Collective Statement, the radical articulation of the tenets and goals of a truly revolutionary Black feminist theory and praxis. Scholars Daphne A. Brooks (Yale), Kara Keeling (USC) and Jacqueline Stewart (UChicago) draw on the CRC Statement to build sonic and visual archives that enable us to speak to and through this present moment of danger, while also summoning the spirit of the original document and the collaborative intellectual, social and political labor that led to its creation. With help from the work of musicians ranging from the Knowles Sisters, Nina Simone, Labelle and f.k.a. twigs to visual artists such as Carrie Mae Weems and the L.A. Rebellion filmmakers, we propose turning the statement into an interactive document that continues to contribute to ongoing efforts to bridge past, present and future Black feminisms. This session calls for audience participation: we invite attendees to listen along with us to the new knowledges we might yet find together by way of music and image. Presented by Cinema 53, a partnership between the Harper Theater in downtown Hyde Park and UChicago's Gray Center for Arts & Inquiry, in conjunction with the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture and the fall Reproduction of Race & Racial Ideologies Workshop series, “From Combahee to #BlackLivesMatter: Exploring a History of Black Politics and Culture,” with support from the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at UChicago. LOCATION: Harper Theater | 5238 S. Harper Ave.

Date: September 28, 2017
Time: 7:00 PM

Sep 21, 1:00 PM: Lunchtime Q&A with Meggie Zayas on Survivor Legislation

0
0
Have you ever wondered about state legislation that impacts survivors? What laws are currently being discussed? How to get involved in the state government? Join Meggie Zayas, an advocate, educator and survivor of power based violence. She'll answer all of these questions in an open discussion covering current legislation, current state issues impacting survivors and easy ways to get involved in the state government. Lunch will be provided. Organized by Phoenix Survivors Alliance and the CSGS.

Date: September 21, 2017
Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Nov 8, 3:30 PM: Bob Pape on ISIS Media

0
0
Robert Pape, Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Chicago Project on Security and Threats (CPOST) will present his team’s expanded research on the evolution of video propaganda associated with violent extremist organizations such as, but not only, Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Part of the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project of the CSGS.

Date: November 8, 2017
Time: 3:30 PM - 6:30 PM