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Channel: Gender Studies Events

May 20, 5:00 PM: Academic Labor in Crisis Times: Jennifer Doyle and Nick Mitchell

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The faculty study group Critical University Studies (CUSS) is sponsoring two public panel discussions this Spring quarter. In this second event Nick Mitchell and Jennifer Doyle will discuss universities’ entanglement with various scenes of security: from campus police and sexual harassment to forms of life that haven’t yet entered the jurisprudential imaginary. 3CT fellow Lauren Berlant and Zachary Samalin moderate the conversation. In the contemporary field called Critical University Studies, a debate is flourishing about what universities are for. This is a debate over how not to repeat the participation of higher ed in the racial, gendered, economic, and policing inequities of the past and present; a debate over how to use our resources to bring better knowledges and relations into being for the present and the future. There was never an inside or outside the university: this area of study keeps discovering entanglements of violence and desire in the orchestration of knowledge and the organization of labor. Presented by 3CT and co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. -- This event is free and open to the public; registration is required. Live captioning will be provided. Please contact us if you require any accommodations to enable your full participation.

Date: May 20, 2021
Time: 5:00 PM

See:https://ccct.uchicago.edu/events/critical-university-studies-academic-labor-in-crisis-times-2/

May 18, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Sarah McDaniel, “Encountering Address: Assembly, Affinity, and ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Workshops are held on alternate (even week) Tuesdays from 5:00 to 6:20pm CST. Papers and a Zoom link will be circulated a week in advance. Tuesday, May 18th: “Encountering Address: Assembly, Affinity, and Archives in the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP),” by Sarah McDaniel, PhD Candidate in English// Discussant: Tina Post, Assistant Professor, Department of English at University of Chicago Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: May 18, 2021
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:20 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

May 17, 2:00 PM: Feminist/Queer Praxis || Trans- Healthcare In Practice: A Panel Discussion

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This panel brings experts together to discuss what centering the needs of trans and gender expansive health care looks like in practice. From questions of equitable access and inclusive sex education to demystifying common misconceptions about the relations of hormonal interventions and future fertility options, this panel provides an opportunity to learn from those doing the work. Panelists include Amanda Adeleye (OB/GYN at UChicago Medicine and a CSGS affiliated faculty), Dan Rowell, AB ‘11 (MSN, RN), Trisha Lee Holloway/ Riddle (Trans and Gender-Nonconforming/Community Health Manager at Howard Brown Heath) and William Pettway (Communications and Operations Assistant at the Center for HIV Elimination, CHAT member, Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health). The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action. This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required via the Zoom link below. If you need assistance to attend, please contact tbrazas@uchicago.edu. Co-sponsored by Careers in Healthcare.

Date: May 17, 2021
Time: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

May 14, 3:00 PM: GNSE BA Symposium

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Join our graduating GNSE majors as they present their BA theses, showcasing gender and sexuality across disciplines. Come celebrate the great work they’ve done this year! Schedule of presentations: • Alice May, “’To one, who yearns for sunset land’: Angelina Weld Grimké and the Poetics of Abolition” • Brian Johnson, “A Little Too Much: The Aesthetic Troubles of Neoliberalism and ‘Trauma Porn’ in A Little Life (2015)” • Catherine O’Carroll, “Marked and Unmarked: Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Individuals Caught In the Double Bind of Administrative Surveillance and Classificatory Regimes in the U.S.” • Chiara Theophile, “Headscarves, Disguises, and Fancy Dress: Clothing as a Mechanism of Female Slave Resistance in Colonial Slave Societies” • Emilio Balderas, “Continuum: Time, Masculinity, and Death in Chicagoland’s Street Gangs” • Imaan Yousuf, “Domesticity and Debauchery: Genre Multiplication, Archival Silence, and the Exertion of Queer Solidarity in In the Dream House” • Janelle Hartley, "Houses, Individuals, and Generations: A Transfeminist Theory of Chosen Family" • José Morin, “Exploring the Closet: Reconceptualizing Machismo through Masculinity and Queer Disruption” • Max Grayzel-Ward, “The Future is Fertile: Exploring How Young Trans People Think About Reproduction” If you need assistance to attend, please contact tbrazas@uchicago.edu.

Date: May 14, 2021
Time: 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

May 20, 12:30 PM: Grief and Grievance in a Pandemic: a roundtable discussion with Joshua ...

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The COVID-19 pandemic has rendered acute the intersecting and compounding losses of our current moment—millions lost to the pandemic on account of the failures of the healthcare system, police assaults on Black life, anti-Asian violence, and ever-increasing class disparities amidst debates about what counts as essential work. And while breakthroughs in vaccine technologies have offered a glimmer of hope, is a return to normal really possible? Indeed, is a return to normal even desirable if it comes with the perpetuation of white supremacist violence and capitalist exploitation? What would it mean to acknowledge the overwhelming grief—the persistent melancholia—of pandemic times? This panel brings together experts on mourning, melancholia, and grief to reflect on the way that grief and grievance have shaped our responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. How might queer, racial, and postcolonial melancholia lend insight into our understanding of the past year? What are the political effects of public displays of mourning when grief is overwhelming or when the customary rituals of mourning, like funerary gatherings, aren't even possible? How do we reconcile the apparent opposition between mourning and activism at a time that so vehemently calls for protests against systemic racism? And, if melancholia yokes the past to the present—refuses to let the past go—then how might the politics of mourning that arise in the AIDS pandemic condition the possibilities of grief and grievance today? Join us for a virtual roundtable discussion on Grief and Grievance in a Pandemic featuring: - Joshua Chambers-Letson (Professor of Performance Studies, Northwestern University); - Jinah Kim (Associate Professor of Communication Studies and faculty affiliate in Asian Studies, California State University, Northridge) - Dana Luciano (Associate Professor of English and Women's & Gender Studies, Rutgers University); and - David Román (Professor of English and American Studies, University of Southern California) Moderated by Kris Trujillo (Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Chicago). This event is free and open to the public but registration is required at https://uchicago.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Q_59GxYaS1myPJSzIHu7gw If you need assistance to attend, please contact tbrazas@uchicago.edu. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture (CSRPC) and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) at the University of Chicago.

Date: May 20, 2021
Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

May 27, 5:00 PM: Book Salon | Love in the Drug War: Selling Sex and Finding Jesus on the ...

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Join the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality for a book salon discussion of "Love in the Drug War: Selling Sex and Finding Jesus on the Mexico-US Border" featuring: • Sarah Luna (Assistant Professor in Women's Studies in the Department of Anthropology and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, Tufts University), author • Sneha Annavarapu (Teaching Fellow in the Social Sciences, University of Chicago), discussant; • Benjamin Fogarty-Valenzuela (Postdoctoral Fellow at the UChicago Ethnography Incubator and the Mansueto Institute for Urban Innovation), discussant; • Amy Krauss (Postdoctoral Instructor, Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, University of Chicago), discussant; and • Kristen Schilt (Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago), moderator This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. If you need assistance to attend, please contact tbrazas@uchicago.edu. About the Book Sex, drugs, religion, and love are potent combinations in la zona, a regulated prostitution zone in the city of Reynosa, across the border from Hidalgo, Texas. During the years 2008 and 2009, a time of intense drug violence, Sarah Luna met and built relationships with two kinds of migrants, women who moved from rural Mexico to Reynosa to become sex workers and American missionaries who moved from the United States to forge a fellowship with those workers. Luna examines the entanglements, both intimate and financial, that define their lives. Using the concept of obligar, she delves into the connections that tie sex workers to their families, their clients, their pimps, the missionaries, and the drug dealers—and to the guilt, power, and comfort of faith. Love in the Drug War scrutinizes not only la zona and the people who work to survive there, but also Reynosa itself—including the influences of the United States—adding nuance and new understanding to the current Mexico-US border crisis. 2021 LASA Mexico Social Sciences Book Prize, Mexico Section, Latin American Studies Association 2020 Ruth Benedict Book Prize, Association for Queer Anthropology, American Anthropological Association 2020 Gloria E. Anzaldúa Book Prize, National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) Honorable Mention, Sara A. Whaley Book Prize, National Women’s Studies Association (NWSA) About the author Sarah Luna is the Kathryn A. McCarthy Assistant Professor in Women's Studies in the Department of Anthropology and the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at Tufts University, with a focus on issues of sexual labor, migration, race, borderlands, and queer studies. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago. She is a former National Endowment for the Humanities Scholar (2015), and United States Department of Education Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Abroad Fellowship in Mexico (2009) recipient, among other honors.

Date: May 27, 2021
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:15 PM

May 14: 35th Annual Middle East History and Theory Conference

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35th Annual Middle East History and Theory Conference Theorizing Gender and Sexuality in the Historic and Contemporary Middle East The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL May 14-16, 2021 MEHAT welcomes graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars pertaining to the Middle East and spanning the sixth century c.e. to the present day. Topics include but are not limited to history, political science, anthropology, religious studies, geography, literary studies, philosophy, art history, and media studies. The theme of this year’s conference is: "Theorizing Gender and Sexuality in the Historic and Contemporary Middle East." The keynote speaker of this year’s conference will be Professor Paul Amar (University of California, Santa Barbara), author of The Security Archipelago: Human-Security States, Sexuality Politics, and the End of Neoliberalism.

Starts: May 14, 2021
Ends: May 16, 2021
Time: All Day

See:https://mehat2020.wixsite.com/mehat



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