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Feb 21, 5:00 PM: Care@Chicago // Artists' Talk and Celebration || "Can’t Wait: ...

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Can’t Wait: Participate An exhibition by Angela Davis Fegan Wednesday, February 21 | 5:00-7:00pm Artists’ Talk and Celebration Can’t Wait: Participate will feature Angela Davis Fegan’s hand-printed wood type letterpress posters exploring the theme of participation as demonstrated care, as part of the CSGS’s series Care@Chicago in February 2018. This exhibition is an extension of an ongoing series of posters that Fegan has produced over the last four years, the lavender menace poster project, which is a public messaging and infiltration project produced through handmade paper production, letterpress printing and laser cut text. The paper production process involves incorporating organic and recycled/repurposed materials for symbolic/emblematic and grotesque results. Letterpress printing is used as subversion of the traditional means of mass commercial communication, and the current quaint production of wedding invitations. The goal of the work is to produce multifaceted alluring/repulsive handmade objects that stand out from the slick media saturated environment and announce resistance from the status quo. The project stems from a desire to voice institutional critique and run interference on mainstream leftist organizations that market tolerance as freedom and rights as consumer choices. Fegan’s interest, in these specific mediums, stems from her committed desire to craft handmade objects in the time of the supremacy of ephemeral digital experience. It is these types of handmade objects that lend themselves to the tactile viewing experience and to distribution through a network beyond that of a single location. It is meant for viewing in public space, such as bar bathrooms, community health centers, alleys, and hair salons. Angela Davis Fegan is a native of Chicago’s South Side. A graduate of Chicago’s famed Whitney Young High School, she received her BFA in Fine Arts from New York’s Parsons School of Design and her MFA in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts from Columbia College Chicago. She has mounted shows at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Montgomery Ward Gallery, Galerie F, Chicago Artists’ Coalition, the DePaul Art Museum, The Center for Book Arts (NY) and the Hyde Park Art Center. Her work has been selected for book covers including How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps by Laura Yes Yes, The Truth About Dolls by Jamila Woods, Secondhand by Maya Marshall, Where Brooklyn At by Roger Bonair-Agard and All Blue So Late by Laura Swearingen-Steadwell. Her work has been written about in The Offing (LA Review of Books), Hyperallergic, Chicago Magazine, the RedEye and the Chicago Reader. Both events are free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture. Event photo by Jasmine Clark.

Date: February 21, 2018
Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care/

Feb 20, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Jennifer Carlson, “The Police Man’s Burden: Race, Masculinity, ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop We are excited to announce the Winter Quarter schedule for the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop. This quarter’s theme is “Global Circuits of Capital, Desire, and Power” and will be curated by Kimberly Hoang, Assistant Professor of Sociology. Papers and presentations will consider new perspectives on the relationship between gender, capital, desire, labor, and power. Tuesday, February 20th: “The Police Man’s Burden: Race, Masculinity, & The Ethics of Police Violence” Jennifer Carlson, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Government and Public Policy, University of Arizona Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Jaclyn Wong, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don’t hesitate to contact the workshop coordinators at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: February 20, 2018
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Feb 19, 4:30 PM: C. Riley Snorton, "Fleshy Encounters: Black Feminisms and the ...

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C. Riley Snorton Associate Professor of Africana Studies, Cornell University"Fleshy Encounters: Black Feminisms and the Mutability of Gender" Part of the LGBTQ Speaker Series. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

Date: February 19, 2018
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Feb 17, 7:00 PM: South Side Projections Chicago Premiere of Barbara Hammer’s “Welcome to ...

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Co-sponsored by the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project at the University of Chicago Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and the Nightingale Cinema. Barbara Hammer will appear via Skype in conversation with Jennifer Wild, associate professor in the University of Chicago’s Department of Cinema and Media Studies and Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. As part of a two-night celebration of pioneering lesbian filmmaker Barbara Hammer, we’re pleased to present the Chicago premiere of her latest film, Welcome To This House (2015, 79 min., DCP), a feature documentary on the homes and loves of poet Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), about life in the shadows, and the anxiety of art making without full self-disclosure. Hammer filmed in Bishop’s “best loved homes” in the U.S., Canada, and Brazil, believing that buildings and landscapes bear cultural memories. Interviews with poets, friends, and scholars provide “missing documents” of numerous female lovers. Bishop’s intimate poetry is beautifully performed by Kathleen Chalfant, and with the creative music composition by Joan La Barbara, it brings Bishop into our lives with new ways and unexpected details. Senses of Cinema raved, “as befits its subject, the film is a primarily poetic project, which inhabits the world of Bishop and her poetry, entranced by the beauty of life in all its forms.” Slant Magazine said “Hammer is careful to keep the film’s focus primarily on a sensorial experience of Bishop’s work and chosen habitat, which at its best becomes a polymorphous evocation of the sonorous affects permeating Bishop’s physical and psychological milieu.”

Date: February 17, 2018
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Feb 22, 12:30 PM: Care@Chicago // Print workshop and demonstration || "Can’t Wait: ...

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Can’t Wait: Participate will feature Angela Davis Fegan’s hand-printed wood type letterpress posters exploring the theme of participation as demonstrated care, as part of the CSGS’s series Care@Chicago in February 2018. This exhibition is an extension of an ongoing series of posters that Fegan has produced over the last four years, the lavender menace poster project, which is a public messaging and infiltration project produced through handmade paper production, letterpress printing and laser cut text. The paper production process involves incorporating organic and recycled/repurposed materials for symbolic/emblematic and grotesque results. Letterpress printing is used as subversion of traditional means of mass commercial communication, and the current quaint production of wedding invitations. The goal of the work is to produce multifaceted alluring/repulsive handmade objects that stand out from the slick media saturated environment and announce resistance from the status quo. The project stems from a desire to voice institutional critique and run interference on mainstream leftist organizations that market tolerance as freedom and rights as consumer choices. Fegan’s interest, in these specific mediums, stems from her committed desire to craft handmade objects in the time of the supremacy of ephemeral digital experience. It is these types of handmade objects that lend themselves to the tactile viewing experience and to distribution through a network beyond that of a single location. It is meant for viewing in public space, such as bar bathrooms, community health centers, alleys, and hair salons. Angela Davis Fegan is a native of Chicago’s South Side. A graduate of Chicago’s famed Whitney Young High School, she received her BFA in Fine Arts from New York’s Parsons School of Design and her MFA in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts from Columbia College Chicago. She has mounted shows at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Montgomery Ward Gallery, Galerie F, Chicago Artists’ Coalition, the DePaul Art Museum, The Center for Book Arts (NY) and the Hyde Park Art Center. Her work has been selected for book covers including How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps by Laura Yes Yes, The Truth About Dolls by Jamila Woods, Secondhand by Maya Marshall, Where Brooklyn At by Roger Bonair-Agard and All Blue So Late by Laura Swearingen-Steadwell. Her work has been written about in The Offing (LA Review of Books), Hyperallergic, Chicago Magazine, the RedEye and the Chicago Reader. Free and open to the public. Event photo by Jasmine Clark. Care@Chicago, a series organized by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) and co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC), will run throughout the month of February 2018. It will include an exhibition of hand-printed wood type letterpress posters, free yoga classes on Fridays, a sexual health workshop, a special study break, and a panel discussion.

Date: February 22, 2018
Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care/

Feb 28, 5:00 PM: Obfuscating Disreputable Ties: Taboo Relationships in the Global Economy

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This panel will examine the structure of exchange between the scared and profane. It will examine markets where actors manage disreputable exchange in taboo markets. To push the field further the panel will ask how do you we think about exchanges that are “legal” but socially disreputable? How do market actors obfuscate disreputable ties through highly intimate and personal ways like gift-giving? Speakers: Gabriel Rossman Associate Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles "Moral Reactions to the Obfuscation of Disreputable Exchange: A Vignette Experiment on Baby-Selling" Ashley Mears Associate Professor of Sociology, Boston University "Obfuscating Exploitative Economies" Kimberly Hoang Assistant Professor of Sociology and the College, University of Chicago "Risky Investments: Varieties of Obfuscation in Frontier Markets" Part of the Gender, Sexuality and Global Capitalism Project of the CSGS.

Date: February 28, 2018
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Feb 27, 5:00 PM: Radical Legacies in Contemporary French Theater: a conversation with Aleksi ...

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Aleksi Barrière is a contemporary stage and artistic director currently working in Paris. In advance of the production of Letter of Love (The Fundamentals of Judo) for Chicago's Trap Door theater, Barrière will discuss his approach to theatrical narrative, performance, and mise-en-scène that draws from two radical, French avant-garde movements: the "Panic Movement," founded in Paris in 1962 by Fernando Arrabal, Alejandro Jodorowsky, and Roland Topor; and "New Realism," which had important ramifications for both painting and performance art. The Counter Cinema/Counter Media Program will sponsor a student outing to the Trap Door Theater on April 12 to see Barrière’s play, which is based on texts by Fernando Arrabal and Yves Klein. Students may reserve a ticket by emailing a request to Dan Bertsche (ddb1@uchicago.edu) or Jennifer Wild (jenniferwild@uchicago.edu). About the play: Letters of Love (The Fundamentals of Judo) We are invited to partake in a judo fight, a game of chess, a reading of tarot cards, a monologue for four voices. This war against war is theatre as seen by poet Fernando Arrabal and painter Yves Klein, in the Latin Quarter in Paris in the 60s where they never met. It is a struggle against the prisons built by the dictators of the bodies and of the minds, even when they are our own mothers. A struggle where each punch and hold will be an embrace – an act of love.

Date: February 27, 2018
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Mar 1, 7:00 PM: Screening of Jane: An Abortion Service with panel discussion

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The Film Studies Center and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality present a screening and panel discussion about reproductive rights. Jane: An Abortion Service is a fascinating political look at a little-known chapter in women's history. The film tells the story of "Jane," the Chicago-based women's health group who performed nearly 12,000 safe illegal abortions between 1969 and 1973 with no formal medical training. As Jane members describe finding feminism and clients describe finding Jane, archival footage and recreations mingle to depict how the repression of the early sixties and social movements of the late sixties influenced this unique group. Both vital knowledge and meditation on the process of empowerment, Jane: An Abortion Service showcases the importance of preserving women's knowledge in the face of revisionist history. (Kate Kirtz & Nell Lundy, USA, 1996, 58 min., digital video) Following the film is a panel discussion featuring Jenna Prochaska, staff attorney of the ACLU’s Women’s and Reproductive Rights Project; Leah Greenblum, director of the Midwest Access Coalition; Tiffany Pryor, executive director of Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health; Kristin Schilt, associate professor and director of the University of Chicago's Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality; Sarah Valliere, clinical training alumna of the Midwest Access Project; and Jennifer Wild, associate professor in the Department of Cinema & Media Studies and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

Date: March 1, 2018
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

See:https://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2018/jane-abortion-service

Mar 5, 7:00 PM: BlacKorea Film Screening and Q&A

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Two children, born to a Korean mother and a African-American father, struggle with the consequences of their parents' decisions and the brutality of Chicago. Based on Patti Kim Gill's life, and directed by Christine Swanson (also Korean and Black), BlacKorea takes an honest look at stereotypes resulting from two cultures colliding. Screening followed by a panel discussion and Q&A with the cast and crew. Free and open to the public. Please RSVP for tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/blackorea-film-special-screening-tickets-42291848056 Presented in collaboration with the CSRPC, CSGS, Center for Identity and Inclusion (CI+I), DOC Films, and UChicagoGRAD.

Date: March 5, 2018
Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Mar 2, 3:30 PM: Elliott Powell: Super Freaks and ATLiens: The Queer Afro-South Asian Aesthetic ...

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Elliott Powell, Assistant Professor, Dept of American Studies, University of Minnesota “Super Freaks and ATLiens: The Queer Afro-South Asian Aesthetic Futures of Rick James and OutKast” Abstract: Popular music scholars generally contend that the 1980s and 1990s were a period of increased politically charged musical cross-currents between black and South Asian sounds and musicians in the United Kingdom and the Caribbean, but not in the U.S. This paper challenges this narrative by exploring the place of South Asian aesthetics in the work of U.S. funk artist Rick James and American rap duo OutKast. In particular, this talk analyzes James’s 1986 album The Flag, his only solo album to feature South Asian instrumentation, and Outkast’ 1996 album ATLiens, their only album to engage South Asian cultural forms, for the ways that these albums use South Asian culture to articulate transformative black political ideologies. Through interviews and textual analysis, I argue that James and OutKast deploy the figures of “freaks” and “aliens,” respectively, as intercultural queer positionalities that trouble the dominant heteropatriarchal discourse of black politics. In so doing, I illustrate the ways in which these albums and artists’ use freaks and aliens to cultivate sonic and political possibilities that help us imagine and articulate a new kind of vision of intersectional, transnational, and coalitional praxis. Elliott H Powell is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of Minnesota. He received his BA in History from The University of Chicago and PhD in American Studies from New York University. He is the recipient of numerous fellowship and awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the International Association for the Study of Popular Music. His work is published or forthcoming in GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism, the Oxford Handbook of Hip Hop Studies, and The Black Scholar (for which he co-edited their first queer and/or trans special issue). And he is currently finishing his book manuscript, The Other Side of Things: African American and South Asian Collaborative Sounds in Black Popular Music, which brings together critical race, feminist, and queer theories to consider the political implications of African American and South Asian collaborative music-making practices in U.S.-based black popular music since the 1960s. A reception will follow. This event is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

Date: March 2, 2018
Time: 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Mar 6, 5:00 PM: GSSW: Caroline Sequin, “Men’s Needs, Women’s Sins: Prostitution, ...

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop We are excited to announce the Winter Quarter schedule for the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop. This quarter’s theme is “Global Circuits of Capital, Desire, and Power” and will be curated by Kimberly Hoang, Assistant Professor of Sociology. Papers and presentations will consider new perspectives on the relationship between gender, capital, desire, labor, and power. Tuesday, March 6th “Men’s Needs, Women’s Sins: Prostitution, Citizenship, and the Nation during World War II” Caroline Sequin, PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Jaclyn Wong, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don’t hesitate to contact the workshop coordinators at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

Date: March 6, 2018
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

Mar 2, 9:00 AM: Beyond Free Speech: A Teach-In

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The Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality; the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture; the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory; and the School of Social Service Administration present a teach on the limits of free speech. The teach-in will consist of two panels and a workshop led by faculty from across all divisions and Chicago-area activists. Event will start at 9:00am at University Church located at 5655 S University Ave. Schedule of Events: Doors Open // 9:00am Breakfast // 9:00am – 9:30am Catered by Sanctuary Cafe Panel: Free Speech/Ideology // 9:30am - 11:00am Zach Samalin, Anton Ford, Laura Weinrib Workshop: Know Your Rights // 11:30am - 12:30pm Steve Saltzman and Molly Armour of the National Lawyers Guild Lunch // 12:30pm - 1:00pm Catered by Sanctuary Cafe The Cost of Free Speech // 1:00pm - 2:30pm Yanilda Maria Gonzalez, Barbara Ransby, and Tanima Sharma Protest // 3:00pm Join UofC Resists Protest @ Booth School

Date: March 2, 2018
Time: 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Mar 7, 1:00 PM: Brauer Seminar: "Roundtable on Religion, Gender and Sexuality"

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Religion, Gender and Sexuality Roundtable The Brauer Seminar Coordinated by Divinity School faculty members Sarah Fredericks, Sarah Hammerschlag, and Angie Heo With a roundtable event about theoretical, empirical, and methodological scholarship in religion,gender, and sexuality, we aim to foster discussion and scholarship at the nexus of these subjects among students and faculty in the Divinity School, University of Chicago as a whole, and the wider public. Speakers include: Amy Hollywood, Elizabeth H. Monrad Professor of Christian Studies at Harvard Divinity School, is a philosopher of medieval Christianity whose work examines mysticism and the psychoanalytics of sexual difference. Mayanthi Fernando, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California Santa Cruz, is an anthropologist of Islam, law and sexuality who explores the secular grounds of 'the Muslim question.' Béatrice de Gasquet, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the Université Paris Diderot, a sociologist of Judaism and Berber migrant communities whose work studies the politics of feminism, religious authority and ethnicity. Cosponsored by the Joyce Z. and Jacob Greenbery Center for Jewish Studies; the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Franke Institute for the Humanities; and the France Chicago Center.

Date: March 7, 2018
Time: 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://divinity.uchicago.edu/roundtable

Feb 28, 12:30 PM: Podcast info sesh (+ lunch!)

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We are looking to revive our currently dormant podcast, The Radius, and we need your help! We hope that the podcast will be a venue for students to create, produce, and share unique and compelling content on sexuality and gender issues. If you have an interest in gender and sexuality and/or an itch to get into the world of podcasting and radio, come to this informational meeting to see how you can become involved. We'll go over episode ideas, production details, and our tentative timelines, as well as answering any questions you may have. We'll bring the lunch; you bring your questions and ideas. If you're interested but are unable to attend the meeting, email tbrazas@uchicago.edu for more info. Hope to see you there!

Date: February 28, 2018
Time: 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/435570613527125/

Mar 7, 12:00 PM: FQP: Brooke Sebold on Women in Hollywood

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Brooke Sebold is a film director, editor, and founder of the LA chapter of Femme Fatales, an all-female feature film directors group. Brooke's feature documentary, Red Without Blue, screened at 200+ festivals, universities, and museums around the world receiving dozens of awards, including the Audience Award at Slamdance, and the Jury Award at Frameline. Her latest project, Stories of Care. No Matter What is a series of mini-docs for Planned Parenthood's recent online campaign. Join Brooke for lunch and conversation about art, gender, and politics in the mainstream. Part of the Feminist/Queer Praxis Series of the CSGS.

Date: March 7, 2018
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/151528492202168/

Mar 13, 6:00 PM: "Our Lady of the Slaves: Marian Devotion in Cuba, Race and ...

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Prof. Jalane Schmidt has has been engaged in field research in Cuba for the past 20 years. For her public lecture, she will discuss some of the fruits of that research: namely, popular devotion to Cuba's patron saint, Mary, the Virgin of Charity. Prof. Schmidt's talk will explore the ways in which this spectacular figure is represented and venerated, focusing particularly on the development of its veneration by Cubans of various racial and religious identities throughout its long history upon the island.

Date: March 13, 2018
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Mar 14, 10:00 AM: Teaching Race and Religion with Prof. Jalane Schmidt

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The Craft of Teaching and the Divinity School share the belief that matters of race and religion, so significant in defining the present moment, transcend the limits of Swift Hall, and it is crucial that specialists from other institutions be invited to guide community members in engaging race and religion productively, responsibly, and with intellectual and moral clarity, not only in classes directly pertaining to these topics, but in all manner of classes where they intersect other fields and problems. For this workshop, Prof. Schmidt will take the lead in guiding us in such dialogue and the ways in which it can be translated productively into the classroom. Prof. Angie Heo will provide a response.

Date: March 14, 2018
Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

See:https://divinity.uchicago.edu/teaching-race-and-religion

Apr 18, 8:30 AM: Interracial Intimacies Symposium

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Please join us for a two-day symposium examining the history of interracial intimacies in comparative and transnational perspective. This symposium offers emerging and established scholars an opportunity to come together to discuss issues of interracial intimacies broadly construed. Doris L. Garraway, Associate Professor of French at Northwestern University, and Sarah Kovner, Senior Research Scholar in the Arnold A. Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University, will be the keynote speakers. For a full schedule and to RSVP, please visit: https://interracialintimacies2018.weebly.com/

Date: April 18, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM

See:https://interracialintimacies2018.weebly.com/

Apr 16, 4:30 PM: Joseph J. Fischel, “Kink & Football, Consent & Dignity”

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2018 Distinguished Alumni Lecture Joseph J. Fischel, PhD '11 “Kink & Football, Consent & Dignity” BDSM draws its moral, political, even erotic energies from consent talk. Yet erotic cannibalism and other lethal sex practices challenge consent as a guarantor of permissible, let alone good, sex. If consent does not vindicate any and all rough sex, what about other rough play, like football? Fischel argues that analogizing kinky sex to football to legitimate the former ultimately indicts the latter. Drawing on material from his forthcoming manuscript, "Screw Consent," and from his current research on the conceptual promiscuity of dignity, Fischel proposes that neither consent nor dignity deliver the sexual politics they promise. Joseph Fischel is an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Yale University. Fischel is a theorist of social and sexual justice. His research on the regulation of sex, gender, and sexuality is informed by normative political theory, queer studies, and critical race and feminist legal theory. His first two books interrogate consent as the magnetizing, dominant metric of modern sex law and late modern sexual ethics. Sex and Harm in the Age of Consent (University of Minnesota Press, 2016) argues that the sociolegal figures of the recidivistic sex offender, the innocent child and the heroic homosexual invest consent with its normative power while obfuscating more pervasive but less perceptible forms of sexual injury and gendered violence. Sex and Harm in the Age of Consent won the 2017 Foundations in Political Theory First Book Award from the American Political Science Association. Fischel received his PhD from the Political Science Department at the University of Chicago in 2011. His dissertation, which developed into his first book, was supported by coursework, mentorship, and/or fellowships from the Political Science Department, the University of Chicago Law School, and the Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality. His dissertation received the 2012 Julian Mezey Best Dissertation Award from the Association of the Study of Law, Culture and the Humanities. Free and open to the public.

Date: April 16, 2018
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Apr 14, 9:00 AM: Engendering Change 2018

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Engendering Change is an annual graduate student organized conference focused on issues of gender and sexuality. The day-long conference rotates host locations between the University of Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Northwestern University; the conference will be held at the University of Chicago on Saturday, April 14 in 2018. Engendering Change provides a space for graduate students working on research in gender and sexuality to present their work, get feedback from faculty and other graduate students, and network. Details TBA.

Date: April 14, 2018
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM