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Mar 3, 4:00 PM: Marty Center Senior Fellows Symposium by Susan Shapiro

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Susan Shapiro, is Associate Professor, Department of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies and Chair, Program in Religious Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Date: March 3, 2015
Time: 4:00 PM

Apr 2, 4:30 PM: Nayan Shah, "Forcible Feeding and the Crisis of Care in Indefinite ...

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This presentation examines the visual representation and visceral vocabulary of the experiences of refusing food and the procedure of tube-feeding by force in the 20th and 21st century. Force-feeding catalyzed political mobilization and controversies of medical ethics during the imprisonment of suffragettes in Britain and U.S in the early 20th century and have rebounded as the prism of ethical and political crisis in the detainees and deportees struggles in South Africa, Guantanamo and Europe. Nayan Shah (History MA '90, PhD '95) is Professor and Chair of the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California and the author of Contagious Divides (UC Press).

Date: April 2, 2015
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Apr 1, 6:00 PM: OPENING PARTY! Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the ...

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From woman-centered relationships between early female professors to the beginnings of Gay Liberation on campus, this exhibition will examine the range of experiences lived by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer students and faculty on the University of Chicago campus. Drawing on the rich holdings of the University Archives -- including the papers of Marion Talbot and Ernest Burgess, administrative records, and a multitude of campus publications – the exhibition will display letters, academic papers, and student newspaper articles, as well as posters, photographs, and other visual documentation. In tracing this complex history, the exhibition will also introduce new materials collected through outreach to alumni along with selections from oral histories of alumni collected by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

Date: April 1, 2015
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/385810698241795/

Apr 24, 9:00 AM: Masculinity on the British Fringe Conference

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Keynote speaker: Joanna Bourke, Birkbeck College, London Details TBA

Date: April 24, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Apr 17, 9:00 AM: The Family: Gender and Sexuality Studies Undergraduate Conference

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Undergraduate Student Conference on The Family

Date: April 17, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Apr 11, 9:00 AM: Engendering Change 2015 Conference

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Engendering Change: The Fifth Annual Chicago Area Graduate Gender/Sexualities Conference April 11, 2015 University of Chicago Keynote Speaker: C.J. Pascoe University of Oregon The University of Chicago, in conjunction with Northwestern University and the University of Illinois-Chicago, is proud to announce the fifth annual Engendering Change graduate student gender conference. The conference will take place at the University of Chicago on April 11, 2012. SUBMISSIONS: The conference is open to graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in any field who are working on research related to the study of gender/genders and sexualities broadly defined. Submissions may also come from any methodological background. Don’t forget to register by March 15!

Date: April 11, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

May 1, 1:30 PM: Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project: Zackary Drucker presentation and discussion

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A presentation and discussion of Drucker's performance. photography, film, and television work. Presented by the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project

Date: May 1, 2015
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Apr 24: Amor Vincit Omnia: Love as a Destructive Force in Italian Arts and Literature

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This event is a two-day graduate student conference hosted by the University of Chicago Departments of Romance Languages and Literatures and Art History. The conference will include five panels with presentations given by graduate students in addition to two keynote lectures given on Friday and Saturday. The conference seeks to examine the theme of Amor vincit omnia, or love as a motivator for the demise of the self in Italian arts and literature. Friday, April 24th: 9.00am—5.00pm: Cochrane Woods Art Center, 157 5540 S. Greenwood Ave. 5:30pm: Keynote Lecture: Giuseppe Mazzotta, Sterling Professor of Humanities in Italian, Yale University The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, 1155 E 58th Street Saturday, April 25th: 9.30am—1.00pm: Cochrane Woods Art Center, 161 5540 S. Greenwood Ave. 12.00: Closing Lecture, Hendrik Dey, Professor of Art History, Hunter College List of Presenter(s): Keynote Lecture: Giuseppe Mazzotta, Sterling Professor of Humanities in Italian, Yale University Closing Lecture: Hendrik Dey, Professor of Art History, Hunter College List of Presenters: Luis Lopez, Romance Languages and Literatures, Spanish, Harvard University Cosette Bruhns, Romance Languages and Literatures, Italian, University of Chicago Jessica Peritz, Dept. of Music, University of Chicago Daniel Rogers, Musicology, Indiana University Christine Zappella, Art History, University of Chicago Sebastiano Bazzichetto, Italian, University of Toronto Marion Beaufils, Arts et Langage, École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales Sylwia Frach, Université Paris III Sorbonne Nouvelle Linda Mai Green, Art History, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University Charles Heinrich, History, Loyola University Chicago Emily Forden, History, University of Chicago John Welsh, Romance Languages and Literatures, Italian, Harvard University Allison Hadley, Italian Language and Literature, Yale University Sophia Farmer, Art History, University of Wisconsin Madison Maddalena Bergamin, Letteratura Italiana Contemporanea, Université Paris-Sorbonne Sponsored by: The Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Norman Waite Harris Fund, the Istituto Italiano di Cultura di Chicago, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, the Department of Art History, the Center for Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Western Mediterranean Workshop, the Lumen Christi Institute For more information, please contact: Taylor Dimke at tmdimke@uchicago.edu

Starts: April 24, 2015
Ends: April 25, 2015
Time: All Day

Apr 10, 4:30 PM: Engendering Change: Artist Night

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PLEASE JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF ARTIST PRESENTATIONS on the eve of Engendering Change: The Fifth Annual Chicago Area Graduate Gender/Sexualities Conference (April 11, 2015) STEALTH (2014) Experimental Documentary, 17 minutes By Chase Joynt and Alexis Mitchell By merging hidden camera footage from a patient’s hysterectomy, with interviews of the objects used in these procedures and spaces, STEALTH poignantly and humorously mobilizes ‘sousveillance’ to subvert the perspective of surveilling machinery. Through a triangulation of corporeal, medical and military technologies, STEALTH provocatively points to previously unexplored histories and relationships between inanimate objects and human bodies. They, Them, Their, He, She, Not It By Sue Kay Lee Sue Kay Lee is an artist from Las Vegas, NV, currently pursuing a graduate degree at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign working across mediums exploring reactions and creations of gender and sexuality. The most recent body of work aims to create various metaphoric surrogates which broaden the boundaries of anatomy and pleasure. “Strange Tubes,” a zine By Amber Sollenberger and Ellen Kladky Individuals with questions or who may need assistance attending may contact the organizers at ucsociologyconference@gmail.com

Date: April 10, 2015
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

See:https://ucsociologyconference.wordpress.com/conference-schedule-of-events/

May 8, 1:30 PM: Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project: Lunch-time discussion with Zackary Drucker

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Small group discussion with Zackary Drucker and the Counter Cinema/Counter Media group. Lunch and refreshments will be served. Presented by the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project

Date: May 8, 2015
Time: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

May 6, 4:30 PM: Celene Reynolds, "From Unequal Play to Unwanted Contact: The Puzzle of ...

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Celene Reynolds Department of Sociology, Yale University From Unequal Play to Unwanted Contact: The Puzzle of Title IX in American Universities Ninety-four colleges and universities are currently under investigation by the Office of Civil Rights for violating Title IX on the allegation that they have mishandled sexual harassment and assault on campus. And yet, until recently, sexual harassment and assault were largely absent from Title IX compliance programs, which instead focused on gender equity in athletics. In this talk, Celene will discuss her new research on how the implementation of Title IX has changed. Using a unique database of all Title IX complaints filed at the postsecondary level with the Office of Civil Rights from 1994 to 2014, Celene traces how the issues cited in complaints and the types of schools that receive complaints have shifted over time. Part of the Sexual Violence on Campus Series. Cosponsored by Resources for Sexual Violence Prevention.

Date: May 6, 2015
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1071672786182833/

May 8, 7:00 PM: Zackary Drucker, "She Gone Rogue" screening and discussion

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Zackary Drucker is an American trans artist whose work in a wide variety of media—from performance art, to video, to installation work, to photography—is emblematic of the artistic hybridity that characterizes contemporary visual artists. This artist's visit and screening will feature Drucker's collaboration with Rhys Ernst, She Gone Rogue, which was recently exhibited in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. As an associate producer for the Golden Globe-winning series Transparent, Drucker is an exciting new voice in mainstream American media as well. Her work is funny, critical, disturbing, and provocative, challenging normative ways of doing and representing gender, and in She Gone Rogue, this material is put in dialogue with a history of trans feminine people, practices, and revolutionaries. Drucker's videos are largely inaccessible outside of galleries or screenings, and this screening places She Gone Rogue in the context of several of Drucker's earlier short pieces. The screening will be followed by a brief talk by the artist, a Q & A session, and a reception. This event is being curated by Nicole Erin Morse, a PhD student in Cinema and Media Studies, and it is supported by the Film Studies Center's Graduate Curatorial Grant, the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality's Counter Cinema / Counter Media Project, The Office of LGBTQ Student Life, and the Karla Scherer Center for the Study of American Culture. Tickets are free. Reservations are recommended (Limit 2 per person). General seating only. Appropriate for ages 12 and up.

Date: May 8, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Apr 30, 7:00 PM: "The Hunting Ground" screening and panel discussion, ...

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Thursday, April 30 | 7-10pm Social Science Research Building, Room 122 1126 East 59th Street Chicago, IL 60637 Following the screening a panel will address three themes in ending sexual violence: the power of narrative and lived experience, transforming rape culture, and enhancing leadership on campus and in our communities. Panelists: - Sharmili Majmudar (Executive Director, Rape Victim Advocates) - Matt Kellner (Student Activist, University of Chicago) - Seed Lynn (Digital Storyteller, Game Changer Chicago) Moderated by Lauren Berlant (George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor of English, University of Chicago) About THE HUNTING GROUND - Directed by Kirby Dick From the team behind THE INVISIBLE WAR, comes a startling exposé of rape crimes on U.S. campuses, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on victims and their families. Weaving together verité footage and first-person testimonies, the film follows survivors as they pursue their education while fighting for justice - despite harsh retaliation, harassment and pushback at every level. Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBNHGi36nlM This event is free and open to the public. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality's Sexual Violence on Campus Series, the Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation in Sexual and Reproductive Health (Ci3), the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA), and Resources for Sexual Violence Prevention (RSVP). Co-sponsored by the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago.

Date: April 30, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

See:http://www.thehuntinggroundfilm.com/

May 12, 4:30 PM: Dagmar Herzog, “Disability and Abortion: Western Europe, 1960s-1970s”

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Dagmar Herzog, Distinguished Professor of History and Daniel Rose Faculty Scholar Graduate Center, City University of New York"Disability and Abortion: Western Europe, 1960s-1970s" Few topics raise problems of precarious citizenship and dilemmas of law and activist strategy more powerfully than the current impasse evident across western (and increasingly also eastern) Europe between women's reproductive rights and disability rights. In nation after nation, opponents of abortion have begun to promote restrictions of women's rights to reproductive self-determination as advances in justice for the physically and cognitively disabled. The ethical complexities are immense, with battles playing out in the courts, in parliamentary inquiries, in the media, and in street demonstrations and counter-demonstrations - even as both government and charitable financial support for dignified and self-determining lives for differently abled individuals and their families and other support- and caregivers is being cut and the necessary conditions for flourishing lives are recurrently constricted. These dynamics have an important prehistory in the theological and political controversies of the 1960s-1970s, and in the ambivalences surrounding the sexual revolution of those decades. This talk will explore that prehistory as well as its consequences in the present, including attention to developments in international law; church-government relations; assisted reproductive technologies; and sexual and reproductive rights for differently abled individuals themselves. Dagmar Herzog is Distinguished Professor of History and the Daniel Rose Faculty Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She writes on the histories of religion, the Holocaust and its aftermath, and gender and sexuality. Her most recent book is Sexuality in Europe: A Twentieth-Century History (Cambridge UP, 2011), and she is currently working on a transatlantic study of psychoanalysis, trauma, and desire in the postwar era, to be entitled Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes. Presented by the Precarious Citizenship series

Date: May 12, 2015
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/702571656518540/

May 13, 9:00 AM: Dagmar Herzog, Workshop: "God’s Disability: A European History"

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Dagmar Herzog Distinguished Professor of History, City University of New York Workshop: "God’s Disability: A European History" The theme of disability intersects many of the big questions of Europe’s twentieth century, even as the terms in which those questions are understood were fundamentally transformed by the cataclysm of the middle of the century. The mass murder of the disabled was a crucial precursor to the mass murder of European Jewry, but the lessons supposedly emerging from those intertwined murders were interpreted differently over time, and have been filled with yet new content and been subject to new contestations in the quarter-century since the collapse of Communism after four decades of Cold War. This workshop will provide an opportunity to consult primary sources from the 1960s and the 2000s as we reconsider issues of memory politics, theories of secularization and religious revival, sexuality, racism, and reproduction from the vantage point of critical disability studies. Presented by the Precarious Citizenship series

Date: May 13, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM - 10:20 AM

May 1: Color in the Early Modern Atlantic World

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Color offers a particularly powerful lens to analyze the Atlantic World because it affords a way to consider economic systems and tactile, material practices, as well as symbolic logics and cultural values. This conference proposes to use the dynamism of color, in both its material and immaterial forms, as a conceptual starting point to explore the Atlantic World in the early modern period, from 1400 to 1800. This approach invites pairing inquiries of artisanal crafts and everyday technologies with investigations of prestige goods and portraiture painting; it also can put into the same frame considerations of Euro-American experiments on the color spectrum with reflections on the color cosmologies of Afro-Brazilians who took up residence in Nigeria. Further, it provokes deliberating how color become racialized and ethnicized, as black, white, and red assumed human form in the multihued societies that took root in the Caribbean, North and South America, as well as in Europe. This international conference will take place on May 1-2, 2015 at the University of Chicago’s Franke Institute for the Humanities. This conference is supported by: The Franke Institute – The France Chicago Center – The Norman Wait Harris Fund – The Center for International Studies – The Center for Latin American Studies – The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality – The Center for the Study of Race Culture and Politics Please direct all inquiries to the organizers: Cécile Fromont (Assistant Professor, Department of Art History) fromont@uchicago.edu Emily Lynn Osborn (Associate Professor, Department of History) eosborn1@uchicago.edu

Starts: May 1, 2015
Ends: May 2, 2015
Time: All Day

See:https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/earlymoderncolor/

May 15, 9:00 AM: Sexual and Reproductive Justice Graduate Student Working Conference

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3rd Annual Sexual and Reproductive Justice Graduate Student Working Conference May 15, 2015 This conference is co-sponsored by the the Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation in Sexual and Reproductive Health (Ci3), Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS), and the Urban Network. The purpose of this working conference is to provide a forum for graduate students (including law students, medical students and residents) to receive critical feedback on their ongoing projects from other graduate students from across disciplines working on similar questions of sexuality, reproduction, and justice. The reproductive rights framework has historically focused on protecting legal rights to abortion and contraception. A reproductive justice framework views reproductive choice through both human rights and social justice lenses. While the definition has evolved over time as the movement behind it has grown, reproductive justice seeks for all people to have the social, political and economic power and resources to make decisions about their health, bodies, sexuality and families for themselves and their community. The term “sexual justice” does not have the same resonance or history as the concept of reproductive justice and this conference seeks to link the earlier reproductive agenda with larger concerns of sexuality, including sexual health and sexual rights, as primary for the construction of a just society. This working conference will allow graduate students to present to one another work and ongoing research exploring the relationship between sexuality, reproduction, and the public sphere. Papers will be pre-circulated amongst participants, and each will be expected to have read all papers. Participants will have an opportunity to present in front of their peers and to comment in turn. We hope to put into conversation students from different fields to enrich the feedback on an issue that spans disciplinary concerns. This event will also be open to the public, who will have an opportunity to address presenters at the end of the session. Please email sexualjusticeconference@gmail.com with any questions.

Date: May 15, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

May 14, 4:30 PM: Artists' Salon: Ramzi Fawaz, "'Flame On!': Nuclear Families, Unstable ...

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Released to popular acclaim in 1961, Marvel Comics’ The Fantastic Four told the story of four anti-Communist space adventurers who gain extraordinary powers when cosmic rays alter their physiology, respectively granting them control over living flame, invisibility, impenetrable rock-like skin, and physical pliability. The Fantastic Four depicted the monstrous transformations of its four heroes as placing them outside the bounds of Cold War gender and sexual norms, their bodies now mutated in ways that destabilized their assumed gender and sexual identities. In this talk, Ramzi Fawaz explores the surprisingly queer evolution of the series, which used the mutated bodies of its heroes to depict the transformation of the bread-winning father, doting wife and bickering male siblings of the 1950s nuclear family into icons of 1960s radicalism: the left-wing intellectual, the liberal feminist, the political activist, and the potential queer. Ramzi Fawaz is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his PhD in American Studies from George Washington University. His forthcoming book, The New Mutants: Superheroes and the Radical Imagination of American Comics will appear from NYU Press in Fall 2015. It explores how the American superhero came to embody the political aspirations of racial, gender, and sexual minorities in the post-WWII period. In 2013, the The New Mutants received the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies Fellowship award for best first book manuscript in LGBT Studies. His research has been published in American Literature, Callaloo, Anthropological Quarterly, and most recently, GLQ. Along with Damon Young, Dr. Fawaz is also co-organizer of the Sexual Politics/Sexual Poetics Collective, a national working group of early-career queer studies scholars in the humanities. The Collective will hosted its first annual conference, "Queer/Art/Poetics," at Wesleyan's Center for the Humanities this past April. Presented by the Artists' Salon at the Center for the Study of Gender of Sexuality

Date: May 14, 2015
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/863836363658121/

May 14, 9:30 AM: People and Things on the Move

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Every migrant decides what things are essential to making a new life and what can be left behind. The two dozen scholars, from four continents and five disciplines, coming together for this workshop will explain how the experience of migration changes, and is changed by, the things that people bring with them and those they jettison. Five themes have emerged as key: Migration’s transformation of the Fabric of Everyday life; The Material Culture of Religious practice; Home-making in Motion; The Use of Things in Extremis: Concentration and Refugee Camps; Memories and Afterlives: Homes and Museums; and, Theft, Appropriation and Re-use. Sessions focused on the discussion of pre-circulated papers will allow for both wide-ranging and intense discussion. Presented by People and Things on the Move: Migration and Material Culture, a project of the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society. Co-sponsored by the Nicholson Center for British Studies, the Chicago Center for Jewish Studies,the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Center for the Study of Race, Culture and Politics, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights.

Starts: May 14, 2015
Ends: May 16, 2015
Time: 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM

See:http://neubauercollegium.uchicago.edu/events/uc/people_and_things/

May 12, 12:00 PM: Applying to Graduate School Lunchtime Discussion

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Kristen Schilt, Assoc. Professor of Sociology, will talk and answer questions about applying to graduate School! Lunch will be served. Please RSVP stuohey@uchicago.edu

Date: May 12, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

See:https://www.facebook.com/events/966705316713336/