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Upcoming Events

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    Location: Experimental Station 6100 S. Blackstone Ave, Chicago RSVP here: https://go.prairie.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=478&erid=2166846&trid=f4be7ea5-5af0-450a-b6ef-4832ff34df94 What does rape look like? From Steubenville to Maryville, how do we and the media respond to and depict male violence, masculinity, and the national epidemic of violence against women? What is rape culture, and how has it been impacted by technology and the widespread use of social networks? Salamishah Tillet, a rising feminist activist and scholar, will explore these questions and more in her talk, "How Ending Violence Against Women Will Save the World." Following her talk, Tillet will be in conversation with Beth Elaine Richie, Natalie Yvonne Moore, Sharmili Majmudar, and Claudia Garcia Rojas. Salamishah Tillet As a rape survivor, scholar, and writer, Dr. Salamishah Tillet has spent her career championing the rights and voices of our most vulnerable citizens. Nominated by Glamour magazine as a “Women of the Year” and named America’s “Top Leaders Under 30” by Ebony. Currently, she is an associate professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania and has faculty appointments in the Department of Africana Studies and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies. She earned her Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization and A.M. in English and American Literature from Harvard University and her Masters in the Art of Teaching from Brown University. This year, she will publish “Gloria Steinem: The Kindle Singles Interview” with Amazon and she is currently working on a book on the Civil Rights icon,Nina Simone. Presented by the Illinois Humanities Council - The Public Square in partnership with the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy, Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, Gender, UIC's Gender and Women's Studies and Social Justice Initiative, the McCormick Foundation's Why News Matters Initiative, and Chicago Public Media. This event is free and open to the public. RSVP is required.

    Date: December 12, 2013
    Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    See:https://go.prairie.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=478&erid=2166846&trid=f4be7ea5-5af0-450a-b6ef-4832ff34df94

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    Details TBA

    Date: February 13, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

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    Details TBA Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: March 6, 2014
    Time: 4:30 AM - 6:30 AM

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    Details TBA Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: February 25, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    This talk focuses on queer, feminist, and transgender responses against digital identification technologies that employ imperceptible tactics. Today, in an era of universal standards of identification exemplified by biometrics, GPS, and metadata, it is no surprise that themes of opacity, illegibility, and invisibility are coterminously emerging. In media theory, there are concepts like Alexander Galloway and Eugene Thacker’s “tactics of nonexistence” and Hanna Rose Shell’s “camouflage consciousness.” New works in queer theory have brought about many useful conceptualizations, such as José Muñoz’s “queer escape,” Nicholas de Villiers’ “queer opacity,” and Jack Halberstam’s “queer darkness.” These concepts and theories insist that refusals of visibility or recognition are tactics for political autonomy. Queerness, informatics, and tactics of opacity paradigmatically cohere around emerging struggles against biometrics and the structural violence such technologies enact on non-normative populations. I consider what could be called a queer, informatic opacity through my current artwork Facial Weaponization Suite. The project consists of community-based, mask-making workshops, in which “collective masks” are created for public intervention. Each mask is generated from the aggregated biometric facial data of participants’ faces, resulting in an amorphous mask that cannot be parsed by facial detection technologies. One mask in the suite, Fag Face Mask, is a response to emerging scientific studies that link successfully determining sexual orientation with rapid facial recognition techniques. Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: February 18, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

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    Deborah Nelson, Deputy Provost for Graduate Education and Associate Professor, Department of English and former director of CSGS (CGS), University of Chicago Title TBA Location: Social Sciences Research Building, Room 122 Reception to follow.

    Date: February 12, 2014
    Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

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    This writing workshop, entitled "track switching," focuses discussion on questions of inter- or trans- disciplinarity, wherein disciplines are considered as arbiters of moral, ethical, and affective approaches to queer and queer of color scholarship. Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: February 4, 2014
    Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

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    "Material alliance" is an exploration of the strange, yet historically motivated material resonances that traffic between "race" and "disability." Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: February 4, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

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    Rizwan Mawani Institute for Ismaili Studies & Graduate Theological Union Based on 4 years of ethnographic research in 17 countries -- from Senegal to China, this talk explores various ways Muslim women express their piety from shrines and Sufi Khanaqas to Husayniyas and Masjids. Sponsored by the Civil Islam Initiative of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Generously cosponsored by Spiritual Life.

    Date: January 29, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    As the line between "geek" and "mainstream" culture becomes more blurred, the debate about what makes someone an "authentic" or "fake" geek has taken on an unmistakably gendered tone. Women are no strangers to having to prove they belong in perceived male-dominated spaces, and perception that women are "invading" geek spaces has invariably led to the label "fake geek" being appended overwhelmingly on women. What exactly is a "fake geek girl" and why does she need to be barred from geek spaces? Who gets to define what makes one a "real geek," and Do "fake geek girls" really exist? If so, does it even really matter? Is it really about keeping geek culture 'authentic' or about keeping certain people out? Six women from the Chicago Nerd Social Club with a diverse range of experiences and expertise in geek culture will tackle these questions and more by discussing some of the blog posts and videos that have sparked debate over this topic. They will share their experience of what it's really like to be women navigating their way through the gates of geek culture. This discussion will include time for Q&A with the audience. Panelists: Carlye Frank, Laura Koroski, Kate Lansky, Karlyn Meyer, Dawn Xiana Moon, Michi Trota

    Date: January 30, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Sam Galloway, Dept of Political Science. This paper intervenes in current research on queer politics by reading William Friedkin?s film Cruising (1980) through a Foucaultdian lens. The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop this term is called "The Broken and the Thriving," curated by Professor Lauren Berlant. The workshop and lectures will float cases and methodological reflections on how to mediate relations among sexuality, debility, race, and biopower; the scholars are also all interested in how reconceiving the object can transform imaginaries of repair, resilience, happiness, fortitude, and/or practices of worlding. Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop. Co-sponsored by 3CT and the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

    Date: January 21, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts?Film Screening Room?915 East 60th Street?Chicago, IL 60637 How to Survive a Plague is an award-winning film story about the inspiring young people who created the most powerful social movement of our time, saving their own lives & millions more. Director David France's film How To Survive A Plague has been hailed by the New York Times as a "moving and meticulous documentary about AIDS activism in the late 80s and early 90s," and won Best Documentary at the 2012 Gotham Independent Film Awards. It tells the story of how AIDS went from a death sentence to a survivable disease. Ordinary people and organizations such as ACT UP and TAG fought for the drugs that would save millions of lives. Their story stands as a powerful inspiration to future generations, a road map, and a call to arms. The 120 minute film screening will be followed by a discussion with: MODERATOR Kristen Schilt?Assistant Professor in Sociology?The University of Chicago PANELISTS Melissa Gilliam, MD, MPH?Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Pediatrics; Chief of the Section of Family Planning & Contraceptive Research; Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion in the Biological Sciences Division; and Director of Ci3 Judy Hoffman?Filmmaker and Professor in the Cinema and Media Studies?The University of Chicago Harold Pollack?The Helen Ross Professor of Social Service Administration?The University of Chicago Free admission.?Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.?However, to help gauge attendance for the event, please RSVP here.

    Date: January 17, 2014
    Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

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    Artist-sociologist Nina Wakeford (Goldsmiths, University of London) Methods Workshop: Inventive Methods for Generating the Social Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: February 25, 2014
    Time: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

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    Amanda Leigh Davis will circulate her paper, "Houses for Dying in: the Reanimated Females of Poe, Hawthorne, and Faulkner." A pervasive convention of the Gothic genre is the threat or terror of being buried alive—the threat, scholarly studies have interpreted, of transgressed boundaries and repressed desires. Freud famously interpreted the fear of live burial as conjoining a presumably once-innocent childhood fantasy—“the phantasy, I mean, of intra-uterine existence”—with “a certain lasciviousness.” Although the link between burial tombs and a mother’s womb may seem practically natural, this chapter takes as its area of inquiry that very link. The Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop this term is called "The Broken and the Thriving," curated by Professor Lauren Berlant. The workshop and lectures will float cases and methodological reflections on how to mediate relations among sexuality, debility, race, and biopower; the scholars are also all interested in how reconceiving the object can transform imaginaries of repair, resilience, happiness, fortitude, and/or practices of worlding. Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop. Co-sponsored by 3CT and the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

    Date: March 4, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Tavia Nyong'o, New York University This talk investigates the time and work of queer fabulation, through a particular focus on the digressive narrator. The recent upsurge in ontological theorizing, Nyong?o suggests, is deliberately interested in losing the plot, in abandoning narrative, and in decentering the human narrator as subject and agent. This new ontological thinking finds an unlikely, if untrustworthy, champion in the fabulous, garrulous, and digressive storyteller, who displays as a symptom what the new ontology would champion as a method. Engaging new ontologists such as Jane Bennett, Timothy Morton, and Levi Bryant, and reading digressive queer narrators such as Vaginal Davis, Jason Holliday (Portrait of Jason) and Suzanne Alexander (Adrienne Kennedy's Alexander plays), this talk argues that the return of the real brings with it, paradoxically, the return of the ?fabula.? Losing the plot, he concludes, does not end the story of the minoritarian subject, so much as it opens up new vistas onto the work of fabulation in the post-historical present. Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: March 6, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Presented by the Artists' Salon of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, and the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry.

    Date: February 13, 2014
    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

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    Tavia Nyong'o, New York University Workshop following 4:30 talk. See calendar. Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, 3CT and the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop.

    Date: March 6, 2014
    Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

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    The Human Rights Program, the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and the Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation in Sexual and Reproductive Health (Ci3) are pleased to present a conversation between sexual and reproductive health practitioners and theorists on the regulation and criminalization of sexual and reproductive health. The first two panelists, Brian Citro and Mihir Mankad, will discuss a UN report they co-authored with Anand Grover, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health, which examines State regulation and criminalization of sexual and reproductive health through the lens of the international right to health. They will also explore the concept human dignity in the context of the right to health as it relates to sexual and reproductive health. Claire McKinney, a PhD candidate in Political Science, will consider Citro’s and Mankad’s report in the context of the political, legal and social debate surrounding abortion the United States. Dr. Brandon Hill from the Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation in Sexual and Reproductive Health will facilitate the discussion. Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to participate in this event should contact Yaniv Kleinman at ykleinman@uchicago.edu or 773-702-1114 for assistance.

    Date: March 5, 2014
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://humanrights.uchicago.edu

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    All Day Write-in CSGS will provide space, breakfast, and snacks to help students continue progress on their major writing projects. RSVP required. Email gssworkshop@gmail.com to reserve a spot.

    Date: March 14, 2014
    Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

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    "Food and the Body" Movie Night/Study Break Showing: "Jennifer's Body" and "Teeth" http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1131734/ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0780622/?ref_=nv_sr_1 Please note: We are aware that these films have visual and/or spoken content that is very sensitive, and we welcome questions and concerns. Please contact Sarah Tuohey at stuohey@uchicago.edu or 773-702-2365.

    Date: March 13, 2014
    Time: 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM

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