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Upcoming Events

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    How are contemporary debates about consent shaping conceptions of intimacy, bodily autonomy, and moral decision making? How has the concept of consent been mobilized to garner support for political movements including and beyond #MeToo? This one-day conference draws together scholars working both domestically and internationally to critically examine the social and political impacts of consent discourses in the wake of #MeToo. Plenary speakers are Ashwini Tambe (University of Maryland, Women's Studies) and Joseph Fischel (Yale University, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies). The conference also features two graduate student panels with faculty discussants Natacha Nsabimana (Anthropology) and Michele Friedner (Comparative Human Development). Co-sponsored by: Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, and the Department of Comparative Human Development. Schedule: 9:30 AM Ashwini Tambe (University of Maryland, Department of Women's Studies) 11:00 AM Graduate Student Panel 1 | The Politics of Consent: Citizenship, the Ethical Subject, and the State 2:00 PM Graduate Student Panel 2 | Carework and Consent: Negotiating Authority, Intimacy, and Bodily Autonomy 3:45 PM Joseph Fischel (Yale University, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)

    Date: March 15, 2019
    Time: 9:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/284849305545304/

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    2019 Distinguished Alumni Lecture Eve L. Ewing, AB '08 “Into a Daybreak: Representing Black Feminism Across Genre” In this Distinguished Alumni Lecture, Assistant Professor Eve L. Ewing (School of Social Service Administration) discusses the influence of black feminist ideas on her work as a writer and scholar, touching on her work in sociology, poetry, comics, and fiction. Dr. Eve L. Ewing is a sociologist of education and a writer from Chicago. She is the author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicago's South Side. She is also author of Electric Arches, which received awards from the American Library Association and the Poetry Society of America and was named one of the year's best books by NPR and the Chicago Tribune. She is the co-author (with Nate Marshall) of the play No Blue Memories: The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks. She also writes the Ironheart series for Marvel Comics. Ewing is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Her work has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and many other venues. Free and open to the public. Image Credit: Amy Reeder, cover of Ironheart (L) and Nolis Anderson (R)

    Date: April 25, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2475856942443102/

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    Virgie Tovar, Author You Have the Right to Remain Fat "Lose Hate Not Weight: An Intersectional Feminist Approach to Diet Culture" Virgie Tovar, named one of the 50 most influential feminists by Bitch Magazine in 2018, grew up a fat girl in a thin world. While researching the intersections of gender, race and size in graduate school in 2010, she was introduced to fat activism and began a journey into self-acceptance with an eye to ending weight-based bigotry on a cultural scale. In this talk, Tovar examines the history and mechanics of modern-day diet culture and fatphobia with a critical and intersectional feminist lens. Photo by Andria Lo

    Date: April 22, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1683191678448999/

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    From its foundation, American culture has employed biblical texts and traditions in recurring and legitimizing the subordinate place and role of women, muting their voice and agency. This looks to be changing: women‘s voices are playing a prominent and forceful role in public discourse. The women‘s pussy-hat march on Washington DC and across the United States, the #metoo and Times Up movements, and the toppling like dominos of formerly untouchable assaulters are all landmarks urging the dignity of women and the need for deep social change. Uniquely in the Bible, The Song of Songs celebrates the voice and agency of women — domestic and erotic, natural and exotic. But it has long been marginalized by Judeo-Christian traditions, occluded by allegorical interpretations that explain away its frank eroticism, deflecting its human dimension with recourse to other discourses privileging the divine, history, or nationhood, for example. While the text of The Song of Songs enjoyed some rehabilitation during the rise of feminist and structuralist biblical interpretation in the 1980s and 1990s, such inquiry was deeply shaped by “second-wave” feminism, and has since receded from view. This conference aims to bring this text into a public dialogue shaped by the complex concerns of the current moment. It will provide a forum for religion in the public sphere, with The Song of Songs at the center of inquiry. This inquiry will move in two directions with a reciprocally informing dynamic: How might the text be a recoverable resource for public thought? How do currents in contemporary thought newly condition and challenge our understanding of this unusual ancient poetry?

    Starts: June 3, 2019
    Ends: June 6, 2019
    Time: 9:00 AM

    See:https://voices.uchicago.edu/songofsongs/

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    What opportunities does responding to sexual violence provide for re-imagining our communities and institutions? What are the opportunities and limitations of approaching sexual violence through the legal system? What do social service providers, nonprofits, and other organizations need to do to be more "survivor-focused"? What resources or areas of support need the most development for survivors of sexual violence in Chicago? Join us for a panel discussion of these questions and more on Wednesday, March 6, moderated by Michael Dango (English) and featuring: • Danielle Boachie, M.A. • Rachel Caidor (Love & Protect and the Just Practice Collaborative) • Sangi Ravichandran (Love & Protect and the UIC Arab American Cultural Center) Refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality Studies and the Vice Provost for Academic Leadership, Advancement and Diversity. E-mail dango@uchicago.edu with any questions.

    Date: March 6, 2019
    Time: 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/605173539908193/

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    Working Together is a new series that brings undergraduate and graduate student activist groups to the Centers to present about their initiatives to the broader community of faculty, staff, and students. We see this series as a way to create more bridges across campus and across generations. Please join us for our second event on Wednesday, May 22nd, which features members of the Phoenix Survivors Alliance: "We are University of Chicago students who work, research and collaborate to provide information and advocacy to survivors of sexual violence. We were formed in the summer of 2013 by students who noticed a lack of advocacy for student survivors on campus. We originally sought to provide support and resources for student survivors. Since our formation, we've expanded our mission to advocate for change on campus. We now work to hold the administration and our peers accountable to creating a safe environment for all."

    Date: May 22, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1245645335617084/

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    Vivek Shraya discusses her photo series in which she occupies spaces and wears outfits to recreate photographs of her mother from the 1970s when she was a single woman recently immigrated to Canada. The collection’s juxtaposition of new and source images creates a dialogue across time, genealogy and gender. In conversation with Nicole Morse (Communication and Multimedia Studies, Florida Atlantic University). Vivek Shraya is an artist whose body of work crosses the boundaries of music, literature, visual art, and film. Her best-selling new book, I’m Afraid of Men, was her­ald­ed by Vanity Fair as “cultural rocket fuel,” and her album with Queer Songbook Orchestra, Part‑Time Woman, was included in CBC’s list of Best Canadian Albums of 2017. She is one half of the music duo Too Attached and the founder of the publishing imprint VS. Books. A Polaris Music Prize nominee and five-time Lambda Literary Award finalist, Vivek was a 2016 Pride Toronto Grand Marshal, was featured on The Globe and Mail’s Best Dressed list, and has received honours from The Writers’ Trust of Canada and The Publishing Triangle. She is currently a director on the board of the Tegan and Sara Foundation and an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Calgary. vivekshraya.com is the digital archive for a living trans artist of colour, featuring her music, writing, visual art and film from 2002 to present.

    Date: May 1, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1012015738968887/

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    Are you a PhD student who is planning to go on the academic job market? The norms and unpredictability of the market can leave applicants feeling confused and overwhelmed. This workshop will provide an overview of the application process, what you can do now to prepare, and provide the foundations for thinking about common concerns, such as “Are this position and institution a good fit for me?” and “How should I present myself?”. Space will be provided for conversations on gender, sexuality, and the academic job market.

    Date: April 11, 2019
    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/417539912338317/

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    The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality is grateful to our faculty affiliates from across departments, divisions and schools who generously contribute their time and energies to the Center and its continued development. Please save the date as we take the evening to celebrate recent books by some of the CSGS’s amazing faculty affiliates on Thursday, May 30 at 5:00pm at the Seminary Co-op Bookstore. Free and open to the public.

    Date: May 30, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/258665415079171/

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    Documentary film practice inflects and is in turn also inflected by the theories and practices around the study of the archive. Documenting the Archive will be a forum for theoretical and methodological interventions in cinema and media studies by invoking the archive’s historical and theoretical relationship with cinema, especially documentary film practice. This conference pushes the boundaries of cinema and media studies to ask what domains of critical inquiry, forms of experience, and historiographic methodologies emerge by examining the multifarious relations between documentary and archives. Keynote address by Paula Amad (University of Iowa). See the full conference program at documentingthearchive.wordpress.com. The conference is organized by Cinta Pelejà, Ritika Kaushik, and Sean Batton. Paula Amad is Associate Professor of Cinematic Arts at the University of Iowa. The author of Counter-Archive: Film, the Everyday, and Albert Kahn’s Archives de la Planète (2011), she has also published articles in Camera Obscura, Framework, Film History, and Cahiers de la Cinémathèque. She has previously taught at Melbourne University, Indiana University, and University of Paris III. She received the Getty Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, a Shpilman Institute of Photography Research Award, and a Visiting Scholar Fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. Co-sponsored by the Departments of Cinema and Media Studies, Anthropology, Art History, English, and South Asian Languages and Civilizations; the Film Studies Center; the Adelyn Russell Bogert Fund of the Franke Institute for the Humanities; and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

    Starts: April 26, 2019
    Ends: April 27, 2019
    Time: All Day

    See:http://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2019/documenting-archive-department-cinema-and-media-studies-graduate-student-conference

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    In recent months, increasing attention to celebrity sexual abuse involving entertainers like R. Kelly and Michael Jackson has called into question how mainstream culture often silences victims of these assaults and protects abusers. More importantly, fans and supporters are often complicit in protecting sexual abusers in the name of fandom. In this dialogue, we will discuss the intersections of pop culture and rape culture and how this moment challenges us all to take stock of our roles as listeners and viewers in perpetuating the violence. Jenn M. Jackson is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago where she has also received a graduate certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies. She will be joining the Syracuse University Department of Political Science as an Assistant Professor in August 2019. Jenn’s research is in Black Politics with a focus on group threat, gender and sexuality, public opinion, political psychology, and behavior.

    Date: April 15, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/982824691927421/

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    This workshop provides a basic overview of the services that the Sex Worker Outreach Project provides, examines cultural biases about sex workers, and considers effective service provision techniques for working with sex workers. Concepts around what is sex work, who does sex work, and why are explored and contextualized socially with an emphasis on debunking myths and stigma around work/workers and breaking down the difference between consensual work and trafficked work. Participants will increase their skills and abilities delivering services effectively to sex worker populations and intersectionally linked groups such as poc’s, lgbtq, women, and financially marginalized populations. Liz Velek has a Master of Public Health from the Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Sexuality and is currently pursing a Master of Sexuality Education at the University of Minnesota. She provides trainings and facilitates workshops on topics related to public health, sexuality, working with diverse sexual populations, and healthy sexuality. She is a former sex worker, a professional artist, and a board member of Sex Workers Outreach Project, Chicago. The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action.

    Date: April 11, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/313440055983323/

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    Evren Savci Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Yale University "Queer in Translation: Sexual Politics under Neoliberal Islam" Evren Savcı is a scholar of transnational sexualities, whose work is informed by feminist and queer theory and ethnographic methodology. She is currently finishing her first book Queer in Translation: Sexual Politics under Neoliberal Islam (under contract with DUP), which analyzes sexual politics under contemporary Turkey’s AKP regime. As she wraps up her first book, she is starting a new research project on “failures of Westernization,” analyzing sexual practices that were deemed “uncivilized” and either heavily discouraged or outlawed by the Turkish Republic, such as Islamic matrimony, cousin marriages, arranged marriages and polygamy, yet are still practiced today. Savcı’s work on the intersections of language, knowledge, sexual politics, neoliberalism and religion has appeared in Journal of Marriage and the Family, Ethnography, Sexualities, Political Power and Social Theory, Theory & Event, and Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, and in several edited collections. She has contributed op-eds, blog entries and interviews to Jadaliyya, The Feminist Wire, make/shift and Middle East Research and Information Project. She was selected Exemplary Diversity Scholar by University of Michigan National Center for Institutional Diversity in 2013. Savcı received her Ph.D. in Sociology from University of Southern California, and her master’s and bachelor’s degrees in Sociology from University of Virginia. Following her Ph.D., she was a postdoctoral fellow at The Sexualities Project at Northwestern (SPAN). Part of the LGBTQ Speaker Series.

    Date: May 6, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    We invite new students to join us for a welcome reception with returning students, faculty, and staff. This is a great opportunity for graduate and professional students from all departments to learn more about our programs and resources and to mingle in a relaxed atmosphere.

    Date: May 2, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

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    For our next Feminist/Queer Praxis event, we will be joined by Nissa Rhee, executive director of 90 Days, 90 Voices, an immigration journalism nonprofit based in Chicago. She is an award-winning journalist with over a decade experience covering criminal justice and global issues both in the United States and Asia. She received her bachelor's degree in Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities from the University of Chicago in 2006, and master's degree in International Studies from the University of Queensland. The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action.

    Date: April 29, 2019
    Time: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1049982758530796/

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    Modern ideologies of “good mothering” demand the resources and family configurations primarily available to privileged mothers. Though less often explored than dynamics of race and class, mothers with disabilities are among those women who have been regarded as unsuitable for the responsibilities demanded of mothers in advanced industrial societies. Through interviews and focus groups conducted with mothers who have sensory and/or physical disabilities, I examine how women with disabilities interpret their identities as mothers in relation to modern ideals of good mothering. I find that motherhood offered some participants a path to feminine legitimacy often denied women with disabilities. Yet, because they are simultaneously regarded as less-than-ideal mothers, participants engaged in interpretive strategies including upholding and expanding dominant standards of good mothering, as well as reframing and rejecting elements of this mothering logic. Some of these mothers also engaged in culturework, performing identity work to strengthen their children’s social justice perspectives on disability and other forms of inequity. Angela Frederick is Assistant Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology at UTEP. Dr. Frederick is a qualitative researcher, whose interests include gender, disability, race/ethnicity, and intersectionality. She is currently working on research projects exploring the experiences of people with disabilities who experience intersecting inequalities, as well as the experiences and perspectives of under-represented students in the stem pipeline.

    Date: April 16, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, April 23rd: “Queer Times, Black Futures" Kara Keeling, Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: April 23, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    This conference seeks to structurally locate white backlash and the reemergence of militant white supremacists in the context of American politics over the last 60 years. The conference's second goal is to empirically chronicle the many iterations of resurgent white nationalism, ranging from mainstream political discourse to the violent activism of the white power movement and alt-right fringe. Finally, the hope is to explore varied notions of futurity and the possible solutions to the republic's deep divides. Co-convened by Faculty Affiliates Ramón Gutierrez and Kathleen Belew. Read more here. Supported by a CSRPC Faculty Grant, UChicago History, Franke Institute, Global Studies Mobility Project, and International House Global Voices. International House Great Hall 1414 E. 59th St

    Starts: April 19, 2019
    Ends: April 20, 2019
    Time: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

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    Evren Savci Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Yale University "Queer in Translation: Sexual Politics under Neoliberal Islam" Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Turkey's President and long-time leader of the AKP government, is known today to most international audiences as an authoritarian, autocratic leader who has consolidated significant power crashing any and all dissent. Today’s AKP, however, is a far cry from the party’s initial neoliberal program that emphasized civil liberties and inclusion of various national Others. In this talk, Evren Savcı traces the shifts in AKP’s governance to suggest not a rupture, but rather a continuity between neoliberalism and securitarian authoritarianism. Focusing on sexual politics under AKP’s “neoliberal Islam,” she discusses what we can learn about the contours of this system from various forms of normalization and resistance that take place under it. This also allows us to ask, she proposes, why neoliberalism and Islam have been discussed separately in queer studies, and what this separation tells us about queer studies’ epistemic approach to the question of cultural difference. Evren Savcı is Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Yale University. Savcı’s work on the intersections of language, knowledge, sexual politics, neoliberalism and religion has appeared in Journal of Marriage and the Family, Ethnography, Sexualities, Political Power and Social Theory, Theory & Event, and Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, and in several edited collections. She has contributed op-eds, blog entries and interviews to Jadaliyya, The Feminist Wire, make/shift, and Middle East Research and Information Project. She is currently finishing her first book Queer in Translation: Sexual Politics under Neoliberal Islam (under contract with DUP), which analyzes sexual politics under contemporary Turkey’s AKP regime. As she wraps up her first book, she is starting a new research project on “failures of Westernization,” analyzing sexual practices that were deemed "uncivilized" and either heavily discouraged or outlawed by the Turkish Republic, such as Islamic matrimony, cousin marriages, arranged marriages and polygamy, yet are still practiced today. Part of the LGBTQ Speaker Series.

    Date: May 6, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2027542917544930/

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    We invite new students to join us for a welcome reception with returning students, faculty, and staff. This is a great opportunity for graduate and professional students from all departments to learn more about our programs and resources and to mingle in a relaxed atmosphere.

    Date: May 2, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

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