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May 29, 4:30 PM: Nan Boyd, "Cruisin' the Castro': Tourism and Neoliberal Consumption ...

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"Cruisin' the Castro": Tourism and Neoliberal Consumption in San Francisco Nan Alamilla Boyd, Associate Professor of Women's and Gender Studies San Francisco State University This lecture will examine the history of tourism in San Francisco, with a focus on the neoliberal commodification of racialized and sexualized neighborhoods. Nan Alamilla Boyd is Professor of Women and Gender Studies at San Francisco State University, where she teaches courses in the history of sexuality, queer theory, historical methodology, and urban tourism. Her book, Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 (University of California Press, 2003), charts the rise of gay and lesbian politics in San Francisco and draws from the 45 oral histories she conducted as part of her research. Her second book, Bodies of Evidence, the Practice of Queer Oral HIstory (Oxford, 2012), co-edited with Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, pairs fourteen oral history excerpts alongside commentaries by oral historians. Nan has also been a long-time volunteer at the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco and founded the Historical Society’s oral history project in 1992. Her lecture draws on research for her current book project on San Francisco tourism. CSGS will offer a special workshop for faculty and students on Thursday, May 30, 12-1:30 pm: "Bodies of Evidence: The Practice of Queer Oral History" http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/events/calendar_detail.shtml?guid=CAL-402882f8-3d402a65-013d-5fa26fe6-0000064beventscalendar@uchicago.edu Sponsored by the project, Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the University of Chicago and co-sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Student Life.

Date: May 29, 2013
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

May 11, 4:00 PM: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: "Roe v. Wade at 40"

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The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Law School present: "Roe v. Wade at 40: A conversation with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg" Seating is extremely limited. Email: may11tics@lists.uchicago.edu to inquire about tickets. This event is a sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality's (CSGS) and the Law School. This is part of a series organized by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade. Events held earlier this year included discussions with scholars from around the country on sex- and genetic-selective abortion and an inter-disciplinary graduate student conference on sexual justice beyond reproduction. Co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics.

Date: May 11, 2013
Time: 4:00 PM

May 8, 6:00 PM: Women in Politics

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Register at womenpols.eventbrite.com. According to many political observers, 2012 should be considered “The Year of the Woman." Not only did voters send a record numbers of female senators to the U.S. Senate, they helped elect a Democratic caucus that is majority non-white male for the first time in the history of the House of Representatives. Female voters have routinely outnumbered male voters in presidential elections since 1984—and the gap is widening. Not surprisingly, women—and issues that directly affect women, from economic opportunity and education to health care reform and reproductive rights—emerged as driving forces in the 2012 campaign. So what impact are women having on our politics and public policy? And from the debate over Sheryl Sandberg’s "Lean In" to Anne Marie Slaughter’s "Why Women Can’t Have It All," what effect are these trends having on the challenges, opportunities and expectations facing women leaders? Confirmed panelists: Mandy Grunwald, Democratic political consultant Lisa Madigan, Attorney General of Illinois Kathleen Parker, nationally syndicated columnist Bev Perdue, former governor of North Carolina Michele Norris (moderator), host and special correspondent, National Public Radio

Date: May 8, 2013
Time: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

See:http://womenpols.eventbrite.com/

May 24, 12:00 PM: Holly Hughes and Esther Newton Workshop

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Sponsored by the LGBTQ Studies Project of CSGS Details to come....

Date: May 24, 2013
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

May 29, 4:30 PM: Nan Boyd, "Cruisin' the Castro': Tourism and Neoliberal Consumption ...

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"Cruisin' the Castro": Tourism and Neoliberal Consumption in San Francisco Nan Alamilla Boyd, Associate Professor of Women's and Gender Studies San Francisco State University This lecture will examine the history of tourism in San Francisco, with a focus on the neoliberal commodification of racialized and sexualized neighborhoods. Nan Alamilla Boyd is Professor of Women and Gender Studies at San Francisco State University, where she teaches courses in the history of sexuality, queer theory, historical methodology, and urban tourism. Her book, Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 (University of California Press, 2003), charts the rise of gay and lesbian politics in San Francisco and draws from the 45 oral histories she conducted as part of her research. Her second book, Bodies of Evidence, the Practice of Queer Oral HIstory (Oxford, 2012), co-edited with Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, pairs fourteen oral history excerpts alongside commentaries by oral historians. Nan has also been a long-time volunteer at the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco and founded the Historical Society’s oral history project in 1992. Her lecture draws on research for her current book project on San Francisco tourism. CSGS will offer a special workshop for faculty and students on Thursday, May 30, 12-1:30 pm: "Bodies of Evidence: The Practice of Queer Oral History" http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/events/calendar_detail.shtml?guid=CAL-402882f8-3d402a65-013d-5fa26fe6-0000064beventscalendar@uchicago.edu Sponsored by the project, Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the University of Chicago and co-sponsored by the Office of LGBTQ Student Life.

Date: May 29, 2013
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

May 16, 5:00 PM: No Condition is Permanent?: Permanence, Flux, and Mobility in Contemporary Africa

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African Studies Workshop Student Conference Distinguished Lecture Charles Piot, Duke University - Migration Stories: The US Visa Lottery & Global Citizenship May 16th, 5:00 PM Classics 110 1010 E. 59th St. Conference Keynote Beth Buggenhagen, Indiana University - Potentiality and Impermanence: Photography & Economic Uncertainty in Dakar May 17th, 5:00 PM Wilder House 5811 S. Kenwood Ave. Conference May 17th, 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM Wilder House 5811 S. Kenwood Ave. The question of permanence, of how to create continuity and belonging, has long been an implicit topic of study in Africanist anthropology. Older anthropological theories presupposed continuity in their analyses of African sociality, even as their ethnographic accounts revealed flux and instability. In breaking with these theories, contemporary anthropology understands permanence as both fragile and elusive. Reinterrogating the question of permanence—asking how it is imagined, actively produced or its absence exploited—opens up conceptual space for a more subtle reading of continuities and forms of belonging as well as ruptures and re-imaginings of sociality in contemporary Africa. Analyses of the emergence, maintenance or unsettling of stability are crucial to scholarship of Africa in all disciplines. In Madagascar and South Africa, Chinese firms are reshaping social, political and infrastructural landscapes through new investments and extraction policies. Whether in the wake of civil wars, or in response to perceived social problems, NGOs have long sought to intervene in processes of social reproduction, raising the issue of how populations achieve or contest cultural and social continuity over time. In post-conflict countries such as Angola a tenuous political stability appears to have been achieved, producing new ideas about what a desirable politics is for a cohesive Angolan nation-state. In contrast, in Kenya, violence after the 2007 presidential election shook many Kenyans' confidence in the permanence of the nation-state, raising the question of whether ethnic belonging was in fact a more durable form of membership. Problematizing permanence raises the following questions: For Africans on the continent and abroad what does permanence mean? What does it look like? What do we find in its absence? Instability? Uncertainty? Mobility? Is permanence always a sought after condition? How is it constituted and how is it undermined? How does its production or destabilization affect imaginations and understandings of belonging? How are the production of space and place linked to changes in the possibilities for permanence and its understanding? Are new understandings of permanence being created precisely through the very phenomena often associated with instability? This conference seeks to address the above-mentioned questions by inviting the submission of papers that investigate the topic of permanence.

Starts: May 16, 2013
Ends: May 17, 2013
Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

See:http://africanstudies.uchicago.edu/news/african-studies-workshop-student-conference

May 30, 12:00 PM: Nan Boyd Lunch Discussion, Bodies of Evidence: The Practice of Queer Oral History

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Bodies of Evidence: The Practice of Queer Oral History A Lunch Discussion with Nan Alamilla Boyd Nan Alamilla Boyd is Professor of Women and Gender Studies at San Francisco State University, where she teaches courses in the history of sexuality, queer theory, historical methodology, and urban tourism. Her book, Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 (University of California Press, 2003), charts the rise of gay and lesbian politics in San Francisco and draws from the 45 oral histories she conducted as part of her research. Her second book, Bodies of Evidence, the Practice of Queer Oral HIstory (Oxford, 2012), co-edited with Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, pairs fourteen oral history excerpts alongside commentaries by oral historians. Nan has also been a long-time volunteer at the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco and founded the Historical Society’s oral history project in 1992. Over lunch, in conversation with Professor Boyd, we will address issues of identiy, narrative, and community history. Boyd's visit is the third in a series of programs at CSGS in 2012-2013 that showcases the work of historians of gender and sexuality who create work for public audiences. It is offered as part of CSGS's new research project Closeted/Out in the Quadrangles: A History of LGBTQ Life at the University of Chicago. To RSVP to this special lunchtime talk and discussion, and to receive advance pdf copies of recommended readings, please email Monica Mercado at mmercado@uchicago.edu. Lunch will be provided.

Date: May 30, 2013
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Jun 4, 4:30 PM: Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop, Abigail Ocobock

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Abigail Ocobock: Gay Men and Lesbians' Experiences and Understandings of Community in the Context of Legal Marriage

Date: June 4, 2013
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Jun 5: CSGS/CSRPC End of Year Party

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Please join us to celebrate the end of another successful academic year! Time and Details to come.

Date: June 5, 2013
Time: All Day

Nov 4, 4:00 PM: Kylea Liese: Maternal Mortality in the Context of Conflict

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The Center for Middle Eastern Studies presents a lecture by Kylea Liese.

Date: November 4, 2013
Time: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Oct 19, 3:30 PM: Humanities Day Presentation

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A "Desire for History": Building Queer Archives at the University of Chicago Presenters: Linda Zerilli, Faculty Director, CSGS Monica Mercado, CSGS Fellow How does queer studies engage with the archive? Since 2007, faculty and students affiliated with the University of Chicago’s Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality have worked to build archival collections documenting the experiences of women and LGBTQ individuals and communities at the University of Chicago. This lecture will give a brief history of the project’s origins in feminist and women’s history, and ask what it means to once-marginalized communities to have a place in the University archives. It will offer a first look at many of the items and oral history interviews that have been collected documenting LGBTQ life on campus from the era of Gay Lib to the present day. The presentation will be followed by a reception celebrating the Center’s newly renovated building on University Avenue.

Date: October 19, 2013
Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Oct 16, 4:00 PM: CSGS/CSRPC Open House

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Join the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture in their newly renovated space for drinks and light fare. All are welcome!

Date: October 16, 2013
Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Oct 10, 7:30 PM: Inside Out Faith: Jennifer Knapp

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Jennifer Knapp, Grammy-nominated artist from the Christian contemporary music genre, shares in story and song her journey of coming out, experiencing the effects of rejection by her own faith community, and creating a positive and constructive dialogue in relation to spirituality and sexuality. A National Coming Out Day special, sponsored by Spiritual Life and the LGBTQ Office Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, Becoming Allies, and Sacred Flame

Date: October 10, 2013
Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

See:http://spirit.uchicago.edu/

Nov 11: Exhibition: RESISTERECTOMY

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Toronto-based multi-media artist Chase Joynt's gallery show RESISTERECTOMY marks the official launch of Tell Me The Truth, a year-long collaboration between Joynt and sociology professor Kristen Schilt, sponsored by a Mellon Fellowship in Arts Practice & Scholarship at the Richard and Mary L. Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry. RESISTERECTOMY juxtaposes the narrative of trans* sex reassignment surgeries with the narrative of cancer surgeries – mastectomy and hysterectomy – the same surgeries, organized in relation to very different modes of telling, showing and embodiment.

Starts: November 11, 2013
Ends: December 8, 2013
Time: All Day

See:http://graycenter.uchicago.edu/events/resisterectomy-exhibition-opening

Dec 6: Graduate Student Write-In

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Details TBA! http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/genderandsexuality/

Date: December 6, 2013
Time: All Day

Dec 3, 4:30 PM: GSSW Graduate Students' Working Group, Katie Hendricks, “Organizing Identity, ...

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Katie Hendricks, Department of Sociology, “Organizing Identity, Masculinity, and Femininity in a Midwestern Fire Community” GSSW Graduate Students' Working Group-For more details: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/genderandsexuality/working-group/ The goal of the working group is to provide for graduate students a forum and space to workshop research and writing at any point in the progress of the work. Students and papers can be from any field, discipline, or methodological tradition, as long as the research is relevant, in some capacity, to gender and sexuality studies, broadly defined.

Date: December 3, 2013
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/genderandsexuality/working-group/

Nov 26, 4:30 PM: GSSW: Cayce Hughes, Title TBA

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Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Cayce Hughes, Sociology, University of Chicago, “TBA” Please see the workshop blog for further details: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/genderandsexuality/

Date: November 26, 2013
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

See:Cayce Hughes, Sociology, University of Chicago, “TBA”

Nov 21, 5:00 PM: Sarah Eltantawi, "Islamic Law and Gender in (Post) Morsi Egypt"

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The Civil Islam Initiative of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality presents: Sarah Eltantawi, "Islamic Law and Gender in (Post)Morsi Egypt" How have questions of gender and sexuality been deployed in Egypt since the 2011 revolution? Dr. Eltantawi will discuss how these issues have come into play at the grassroots and official levels in the Egyptian revolutionary context

Date: November 21, 2013
Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Nov 19, 4:30 PM: Susan Wood, Controversy over Contraception: From Emergency Contraception to ...

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Controversy over Contraception: From Emergency Contraception to Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act Susan Wood, Associate Professor of Health Policy & Director of the Jacobs Institute of Women’s Health at George Washington University Susan Wood’s work and public advocacy focuses on the use of scientific knowledge in public policy. She previously was Assistant Commissioner for Women’s Health at the FDA, and directed the FDA Office of Women’s Health from 2000-2005 when she resigned on principle over continued delay of approval of emergency contraception over-the-counter. Prior to her time at FDA, Dr. Wood was Director of Policy and Program Development at the US Dept of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health. From 1990-1995, Dr. Wood worked on Capitol Hill as professional staff for the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues. Initially as Science Advisor and later as Deputy Director to the Caucus, Dr. Wood helped develop and promote the Women’s Health Equity Act, and was directly involved with many policy initiatives and legislative proposals which would advance biomedical research, women’s health, family planning, and health care reform. Previously, Dr. Wood was a research scientist at John Hopkins University School of Medicine; she received her PhD in biology from Boston University.

Date: November 19, 2013
Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Jan 17, 6:00 PM: How to Survive a Plague

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"How to Survive a Plague" is an award-winning film story about the inspiring young people who created the most powerful social movement of our time, saving their own lives & millions more. Director David France's film "How To Survive A Plague" has been hailed by the New York Times as a "moving and meticulous documentary about AIDS activism in the late 80s and early 90s," and won Best Documentary at the 2012 Gotham Independent Film Awards. It tells the story of how AIDS went from a death sentence to a survivable disease. Ordinary people and organizations such as ACT UP and TAG fought for the drugs that would save millions of lives. Their story stands as a powerful inspiration to future generations, a road map, and a call to arms. The 120 minute film screening will be followed by a discussion with: MODERATOR Kristen Schilt
, Assistant Professor in Sociology
The University of Chicago PANELISTS Melissa Gilliam, MD, MPH
, Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Pediatrics; Chief of the Section of Family Planning & Contraceptive Research; Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion in the Biological Sciences Division; and Director of Ci3 Judy Hoffman
, Filmmaker and Professor in the Cinema and Media Studies
The University of Chicago Harold Pollack, 
The Helen Ross Professor of Social Service Administration
The University of Chicago Free admission.
Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.
However, to help gauge attendance for the event, please RSVP here: https://scienceonthescreen.uchicago.edu/content/rsvp

Date: January 17, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

See:https://scienceonthescreen.uchicago.edu/content/rsvp