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Upcoming Events
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    A 60-minute, come-as-you-are, all-levels yoga session with Anna Schabold. Anna Schabold lovingly weaves together Forrest Yoga, Structural Integration Therapy, clinical Western Herbalism, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. An enthusiastic somanaut, she encourages curiosity about the mysteries within our bodies and our beings. Explore your own inner world using hands-on techniques, deep breathing, and focused attention to feeling. Anna desires to help others discover that yoga is for every body, and to help you remember your ability to feel good in your own skin, all while having a lot of fun. Our physical practice will include mindful intention setting, core strengthening, longer holds in poses, and a slower-paced flow. All levels welcome. To learn more about Anna Schabold and her practice, visit: http://www.boldlygoyoga.com/ Free and open to the public. Care@Chicago, a series organized by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, will run throughout the month of February 2020. It will feature free yoga classes on Fridays, lectures, a special Galentine's Day study break, and a workshop on midwifery.

    Date: February 7, 2020
    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

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    Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making lyric essays by twenty-seven contemporary Native writers from tribal nations across Turtle Island into a well-crafted basket. Shapes of Native Nonfiction features a dynamic combination of established and emerging Native writers, including Stephen Graham Jones, Deborah Miranda, Terese Marie Mailhot, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Eden Robinson, and Kim TallBear. Their ambitious, creative, and visionary work with genre and form demonstrate the slippery, shape-changing possibilities of Native stories. Considered together, they offer responses to broader questions of materiality, orality, spatiality, and temporality that continue to animate the study and practice of distinct Native literary traditions in North America. Lunch will be provided. Elissa Washuta is a member of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe and a nonfiction writer. She is the author of Starvation Mode and My Body Is a Book of Rules, named a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Creative Capital, Artist Trust, 4Culture, and Potlatch Fund. Elissa is an assistant professor of creative writing at the Ohio State University. Theresa Warburton lives in Lummi, Nooksack, and Coast Salish Territories in Bellingham, WA. She is an Associate Professor of English at Western Washington University where she is also an affiliate faculty in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Canadian-American Studies. She is also the author of Other Worlds Here: Native Women’s Literatures and Contemporary Anarchist Movements, forthcoming from Northwestern University Press. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Department of Comparative Literature, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights.

    Date: February 21, 2020
    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2609350362479608/

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    While you can make an appointment to talk about your major at any time, we know that sometimes it’s easier to know you can just stop in and get your answers quickly. So we’ll be holding office hours in the CSGS Community Room at least twice per quarter for any questions you might have. Get advice on upcoming courses, major/minor requirements, events or whatever else you’d like to talk about!

    Date: February 21, 2020
    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

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    Just as a basket's purpose determines its materials, weave, and shape, so too is the purpose of the essay related to its material, weave, and shape. Editors Elissa Washuta and Theresa Warburton ground this anthology of essays by Native writers in the formal art of basket weaving. Using weaving techniques such as coiling and plaiting as organizing themes, the editors have curated an exciting collection of imaginative, world-making lyric essays by twenty-seven contemporary Native writers from tribal nations across Turtle Island into a well-crafted basket. Shapes of Native Nonfiction features a dynamic combination of established and emerging Native writers, including Stephen Graham Jones, Deborah Miranda, Terese Marie Mailhot, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Eden Robinson, and Kim TallBear. Their ambitious, creative, and visionary work with genre and form demonstrate the slippery, shape-changing possibilities of Native stories. Considered together, they offer responses to broader questions of materiality, orality, spatiality, and temporality that continue to animate the study and practice of distinct Native literary traditions in North America.

    Date: February 21, 2020
    Time: 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, February 25: “Bi-Sexual Ambiguity: Psychic, Somatic Confusion in Freud’s Three Essays” Alexander Wolfson, PhD Candidate, Philosophy of Religions Discussant: Patrick Jagoda, Professor of English Language and Literature and Cinema and Media Studies Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: February 25, 2020
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Lori Marso Doris Zemurray Stone Professor of Modern Literary and Historical Studies and Professor of Political Science, Union College"Dear Dick: A Feminist Politics of the Epistolary" In this talk, I read I Love Dick, the 1997 feminist cult classic by Chris Kraus that was made into a 2016 Amazon television series directed by Jill Soloway, as an epistolary romance. Thematically, the series expresses female desire as a question of freedom and address. The story unfolds in letters that Chris writes to Dick, letters that are themselves inspired by the audacity of female desire expressed in feminist films, read by other women characters in the series, and taken up by spectators. Explicitly about female desire, but telling no clear truths, I Love Dick, I argue, is productively seen as in conversation with Simone de Beauvoir’s writing on myths about Woman in The Second Sex, as well as her work on the expression of women’s desire on screen by Brigitte Bardot in the film And God Created Woman. The questions of desire are asked here as: What if we all started writing letters to Dick? Could we be free? Lori Jo Marso is Doris Zemurray Stone Professor of Modern Literary and Historical Studies and Professor of Political Science at Union College. She is the author or editor of several books, most recently Politics with Beauvoir (2017), Politics, Theory, and Film: Critical Encounters with Lars von Trier (2016), and 51 Key Feminist Thinkers (2016). Part of the Feminism and the Radical Democratic Imaginary series. Co-sponsored by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT).

    Date: February 24, 2020
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/478910716365902/

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    Meet Cynthia Jacinthe and Sierra Ribero, UChicago nurse midwives, who will talk about the field of midwifery and the many options for students interested in women’s health care. Some of these possibilities are community/public health, research and direct care. At UChicago, midwives are advanced practice nurses who specialize in pregnancy, labor and childbirth as well as postpartum, infant and well-woman care. Nurse midwives' expertise is rooted in a philosophy of care that prioritizes evidence-based practices and customizes the birth experience to each woman's unique health needs and preferences. Numerous studies associate midwifery with highly favorable outcomes for mothers and babies. The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action.

    Date: February 27, 2020
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/453840328834354/

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, March 10: “Lost in Transit: Kinship, Migration, and the Traffic in Women” Demetra Kasimis, Assistant Professor of Political Science Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: March 10, 2020
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    The rising incomes of top earners, who are mostly White men, drive current trends in widening economic inequality in the United States. I present an insider’s look at the inner workings of the notoriously rich and secretive hedge fund industry as a case study of the U.S. working rich. Drawing from in-depth interviews and field observations, I find that the industry’s White male domination and extremely high earnings are deeply intertwined. This case study captures the upper echelons of a society in which elite White masculinity has been redefined as the capacity to manage risk and uncertainty. Facing an unpredictable stock market, hedge fund workers build networks and workplaces organized around trust. In this context, bureaucracy has become understood as the force of inefficiency and patronage as the most efficient and secure way to do business. At hedge funds, patrimonialism allows a select group of mostly White men to groom and transfer capital to one another. I argue that networks of trust have returned as the fabric of enterprise in late-stage finance capitalism and that this helps to explain the gender, race, and class dimensions of widening income and wealth inequality. Megan Tobias Neely is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Women’s Leadership Innovation Lab at Stanford University and an incoming Assistant Professor in the Department of Organization at Copenhagen Business School. Her research examines rising economic inequality through the lens of gender, race, and social class. Her recent book with Ken-Hou Lin, entitled Divested: Inequality in the Age of Finance, examines how the expansion of the U.S. financial sector is a fundamental cause of rising economic inequality. She is currently writing a book on the hedge fund industry on how race, gender, and social class underpin the social fabric of the U.S. financial elite. Part of the Gender, Sexuality and Global Capitalism Project.

    Date: March 9, 2020
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2592365701043636/

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    How Long Must We Wait for Liberty: A Suffragette-Style Banner Workshop with Shelby Rodeffer Monday, March 2 | 4:30-6:30pm As Women’s History Month begins and we approach the centennial of the ratification of the 19th amendment, join us for a hands-on suffragette-style banner and flag making workshop. In this two-hour workshop, Chicago-based painter and commercial artist Shelby Rodeffer will guide attendees in producing banner and flag-style signs a’la the original suffragettes, with messages reimagined to reflect the evolution of feminist public thought over the last century. In this workshop, we seek to honor the work of feminists of the first wave while incorporating the strides toward intersectionality and inclusivity made by the third and fourth wave. Free to attend, but RSVP via Eventbrite required (link below). Shelby Rodeffer is a Chicago-based painter and commercial artist. Raised in Nashville, Tennessee, she embraces signs of the human hand in both personal and professional work. Her influence comes from folk art and representational art. Shelby's most recent work deals with femininity, connection and isolation through the use of female figures, structures and letterforms. She is also fond of traditional sign making as a means of communication and as a practical form of artistic expression. Currently, Shelby can be found sign painting and participating in various public art projects. Shelby’s work can be found online at http://shelbyrodeffer.com/ and around Chicago.

    Date: March 2, 2020
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/565641347360014

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