Quantcast
Loading...
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)
Loading...

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Loading...

Channel Description:

Upcoming Events

older | 1 | .... | 31 | 32 | (Page 33) | 34 | 35 | 36 | newer

    0 0

    Take a break from studying for finals and join us for lawn games and bubble tea on the front lawn of the Centers! Celebrate the end of the year with CRES and GNSE! (Rain location: first floor of the 5733)

    Date: June 7, 2019
    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1290804801068425/

    0 0

    Join us for a panel lecture and roundtable discussion of the new abortion bans. • What are the short- and long-term implications? • Is Roe v. Wade going to be repealed? Since it protects privacy and not abortion per se, what would the implications be for reproductive healthcare? • How did we get here in the first place? Why are reproductive rights so under attack? • What can you, personally, do? Featured Speakers • Prof. Jane Dailey, History, the Law School, and the College • Prof. Susan Gal, Anthropology, Linguistics, and the College • Ameri R. Klafeta, Senior Staff Attorney, ACLU of Illinois • Dr. Maryl Sackeim, MD, University of Chicago Hospitals • Prof. Geoffrey Stone, the Law School If you have any questions or comments, please contact the organizers, Andrea Ford alillyf@uchicago.edu and Amy McLachlan amclachlan@uchicago.edu

    Date: June 5, 2019
    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/447473009149908/

    0 0

    Linn Tonstad of Yale University Divinity School will give a public lecture as part of our Diversity and Inclusion speaker series, which focuses on issues of race and gender in the study of religion. Professor Tonstad is a constructive theologian working at the intersection of systematic theology with feminist and queer theory. Her first book, God and Difference: The Trinity, Sexuality, and the Transformation of Finitude (link is external), was published by Routledge in 2016 and was named both as a best new book in ethics and a best new book in theology in Christian Century in the spring of 2017. Her second book, Queer Theology: Beyond Apologetics (link is external)was published by Cascade in 2018. She joined the Yale Divinity School faculty in 2012 after teaching at Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University and Valparaiso University. Her teaching interests include Christian theology, queer and feminist theory, philosophy of religion, and theological method. Professor Tonstad has made contributions to various journals, including Modern Theology, International Journal of Systematic Theology, and Theology & Sexuality. She is co-chair of the Theology and Religious Reflection unit and serves on the steering committee of the Queer Studies in Religion unit of the American Academy of Religion. She is also an associate editor at Political Theology. She is currently working on her third book, tentatively titled The Impossible Other: Theology, Queer Theory, and the Temptation of Human Redemption.

    Date: February 10, 2020
    Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

    0 0

    Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin"Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism" Making headlines when it was launched in 2015, Omise’eke Tinsley’s undergraduate course “Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism” has inspired students from all walks of life. In Beyoncé in Formation, Tinsley now takes her rich observations beyond the classroom, using the blockbuster album and video Lemonade as a soundtrack for vital new-millennium narratives. Woven with candid observations about her life as a feminist scholar of African studies and a cisgender femme married to a trans spouse, Tinsley’s “Femme-onade” mixtape explores myriad facets of black women’s sexuality and gender. Turning to Beyoncé’s “Don’t Hurt Yourself,” Tinsley assesses black feminist critiques of marriage and then considers the models of motherhood offered in “Daddy Lessons,” interspersing these passages with memories from Tinsley’s multiracial family history. Her chapters on nontraditional bonds culminate in a discussion of contemporary LGBT politics through the lens of the internet-breaking video “Formation,” underscoring why Beyoncé’s black femme-inism isn’t only for ciswomen. From pleasure politics and the struggle for black women’s reproductive justice to the subtext of blues and country music traditions, the landscape in this tour is populated by activists and artists (including Loretta Lynn) and infused with vibrant interpretations of Queen Bey’s provocative, peerless imagery and lyrics. In the tradition of Roxanne Gay’s Bad Feminist and Jill Lepore’s best-selling cultural histories, Beyoncé in Formation is the work of a daring intellectual who is poised to spark a new conversation about freedom and identity in America. Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley is an associate professor of African and African Diaspora Studies and Associate Director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, where she teaches the popular course Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism. Tinsley is the author of Thiefing Sugar: Eroticism between Women in Caribbean Literature and Ezili’s Mirrors: Imagining Black Queer Genders. Co-sponsored by the Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop

    Date: December 2, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/363490074604026/

    0 0

    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, November 19th: "Risky Roads, Safe Suspicions: gender, class, and cabs in Hyderabad, India" Sneha Annavarapu, PhD Candidate, Sociology Discussant: Rochona Majumdar, Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies & South Asian Languages and Civilizations Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: November 19, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

    Loading...
    0 0

    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, November 5th: “Disparate Treatment versus Disparate Impact: Comparing the Legal Logics of Title IX Claims" Kathryn Hendricks, Dissertation Fellow and PhD Candidate, Sociology Discussant: Anna Maria Marshall, Associate Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Illinois Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: November 5, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

    0 0

    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, October 22nd: “'Where is the safe place?'; Legal socialization and intersections of police and interpersonal violence among young transgender women" Jane Hereth, Residential Fellow and PhD Candidate, Social Service Administration Discussant: Yanilda González, Assistant Professor, Social Service Administration Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: October 22, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

    0 0

    ADEN KUMLER, Associate Professor of Art History and of Romance Languages and Literatures, will deliver the 2019 Nuveen Lecture at The Divinity School: "Unmade by design: The Eucharist and other medieval works of art" Professor Kumler’s work focuses on the imbrication of art, material culture, and religion in European medieval culture. Anchored in a deep interest in how the material conditions of life shape possibilities for thought, imagination, and action and committed to a rigorously interdisciplinary tradition of Europeanist medieval studies, Kumler aims to critically engage questions and problems fundamental to the history of art and culture, writ large. Kumler is also Associate Faculty in the Divinity School and Affiliate Faculty with the Center for Gender Studies, and Medieval Studies Program. Her research has been supported by the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, the Medieval Academy of America, The Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts. The author of "Translating Truth: Ambitious Images and Religious Knowledge in Late Medieval France and England" (Yale University Press, 2011) and numerous essays on topics including the material production of the sacred in the Middle Ages, the crafting of Middle English lyrics in the form of objects, early medieval and late medieval experiments with abstraction, as well as the little-known medieval origins of the modern waffle. She is currently completing a book, tentatively titled The Multiplication of the Species: Medieval Economies of Form, Substance, and Accident, that examines the formal and conceptual relationships cultivated between the Eucharistic host, coins, and seals over the course of the Middle Ages. Kumler's teaching has been recognized with both the University of Chicago's Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring and the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. John S. Nuveen was one of Chicago’s most influential business leaders and an active civil and cultural leader with ties to many educational institutions. At the University of Chicago, he served as chairman of the University’s Alumni Association and as a trustee of the Baptist Theological Union, who established the Nuveen lecture in 1972 and manage an endowment that supports the University of Chicago Divinity School. Each year, a prominent member of the University's faculty is invited by the BTU and the Divinity School to deliver the lecture. Past lecturers have included Wu Hung, Janet Rowley, Jonathan Lear, and Leon Kass. This year’s lecture will be held on Thursday, October 17 2019, at 4:30 pm in Swift Hall's third-floor Lecture Hall. This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow. If you need an accommodation to attend an event, please call Suzanne Riggle at 773-702-8219.

    Date: October 17, 2019
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    0 0

    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, October 8th: "Navigating Graduate School: Advice from Recent PhDs" A panel featuring Eman Abdeladi (Provost Postdoctoral Fellow in Comparative Human Development), Carlos Cardenas-Iriguez (Social Science Teaching Fellow), and Caterina Fugazzola (Earl Johnson Instructor in MAPSS) Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: October 8, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

    0 0

    Please join the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture for an open house to kick off the 2019-2020 school year. Light fare and drinks will be provided. All are welcome!

    Date: October 3, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/377913473123855/

    Loading...
    0 0

    Maria Cecilia Hwang Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies and Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, McGill University"Unbound and Bound Spheres of Globalization: Borders, Markets, and Asymmetries in Global Mobility" This talk compares the regional circulation across Asian global cities of independent women sex workers from the Philippines and the global mobility of their male clients, who are mostly professional expatriates and business travelers from Global North countries. Based on a qualitative study conducted in Hong Kong and the Philippines between 2010 and 2018, this talk expands current theorizations of global circuits by empirically revealing the asymmetries in the mobility of transnational professionals and transnational low-wage workers. It demonstrates the emergence of “unbound and bound spheres of globalization” in which the formal circuits of professional expatriates and business travelers are indeed unbound and global in scope while their low-wage counterparts in Asian global cities, which includes Filipina sex workers, are more than likely to only circulate within a bound “regional pocket of free travel” in Asia. Maria Cecilia Hwang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies and the Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at McGill University. Before joining McGill, she was a Henry Luce Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Southeast Asian Studies at Rice University. Hwang is a qualitative sociologist who employs ethnography to examine social and political economic processes in globalization. She is interested in identifying the inequalities that emerge in globalization, the borders and boundaries it creates and sustains, and the stratifications that arise. Her works have been published in International Migration Review, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, and WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly. Part of the Gender, Sexuality and Global Capitalism Project.

    Date: November 1, 2019
    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2394068277499358/

    0 0

    Alison Delpercio, the director of the All Children - All Families project at the Human Rights Campaign will discuss her organization's LGBTQ advocacy within child welfare agencies. Alison and her team provide in-depth training and technical assistance to public and private agencies on improving practice with LGBTQ children, youth, adults and families. Alison has a Masters in Social Work so this is also a great opportunity to think about career paths in that field. The Feminist/Queer Praxis series, aimed at undergraduate audiences, brings artists, activists, scholars, and professionals to CSGS to talk about their work in the world as people committed to queer and feminist values and action.

    Date: October 28, 2019
    Time: 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2142892649150559/

    0 0

    “A tale of two Karens, "Why Karen Carpenter Matters" is a story of displacement in which Karen Tongson brilliantly reveals how those of us who live outside the narrow confines of white, cisgender, capitalist America found a home—and a voice—in the aural landscape of a seemingly quintessential white-bread, suburban American pop star—Karen Carpenter. ” Mx Justin Vivian Bond, Author of "Tango: My Childhood Backwards & in High Heels" Karen Tongson discusses "Why Karen Carpenter Matters" with Lauren Berlant. A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion. At the Co-op. This event is being co-presented by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. About the book: In "Why Karen Carpenter Matters," Karen Tongson (whose Filipino musician parents named her after the pop icon) interweaves the story of the singer’s rise to fame with her own trans-Pacific journey between Manila—where imitations of American pop styles flourished—and Karen Carpenter’s home ground of Southern California. Tongson reveals why the Carpenters' chart-topping, seemingly whitewashed musical fantasies of "normal love" can now have profound significance for her—as well as for other people of color, LGBT+ communities, and anyone outside the mainstream culture usually associated with Karen Carpenter’s legacy. This hybrid of memoir and biography excavates the destructive perfectionism at the root of the Carpenters’ sound, while finding the beauty in the singer's all too brief life. About the author: Karen Tongson is associate professor of English, gender and sexuality studies, and American studies and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. She is also the author of "Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries" and the co-editor of the "Postmillennial Pop" book series at NYU Press. Her cultural commentary has appeared in "The Los Angeles Times," "The Washington Post," and other publications, and she is a panelist on MaximumFun.org's “Pop Rocket” podcast. About the interlocutor: Lauren Berlant is George M. Pullman Professor of English at the University of Chicago. She is the author or editor of eight books, including "Cruel Optimism" and "The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture", as well as her most recent book, "The Hundreds" (with Kathleen Stewart).

    Date: October 17, 2019
    Time: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    0 0

    Hear about the requirements of the Gender and Sexuality Studies major while sipping a hot cup of chai and munching on tasty samosas! You’ll meet the faculty and staff who will be your contact points as you think about what you want to study. There will also be current students there and between us we can answer any and all questions you may have! Please RSVP here: https://collegesurveys.uchicago.edu/node/25

    Date: October 15, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2345683755694160/

    0 0

    Join us on National Coming Out Day for lunch and a screening of Michelle Citron's film "Lives: Visible" LIVES: VISIBLE (2017, 35 mins): Lesbians in a box… two thousand private snapshots hidden away for over fifty years reveal the rich history of Chicago’s working class butch/fem life in the pre-Stonewall era. Spanning four decades, from the 1930s to the early 1970s, the snapshots provide a rare look at a vanished and vibrant Lesbian culture: images of lovers and friends as they played, posed, serially switched partners, worked, partied, drank, and aged. Now we all take selfies; these women used a Brownie camera to tell the story of their community. LIVES: VISIBLE explores the ephemeral nature of culture and the power of the images we make. Lunch will be provided!

    Date: October 11, 2019
    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/2447248718657205/

    Loading...
    0 0

    While you can make an appointment to talk about your major at any time, we know that sometimes it’s easier to know you can just stop in and get your answers quickly. So we’ll be holding office hours in the CSGS Community Room at least twice per quarter for any questions you might have. Get advice on upcoming courses, major/minor requirements, events or whatever else you’d like to talk about!

    Date: October 11, 2019
    Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/908788472837951/?event_time_id=908788479504617

    0 0

    Join Eric Stanley, Assistant Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies at UC Berkeley, for a discussion of Tourmaline’s 2017 film “The Personal Things.” The film documents Miss Major’s decision to change her identification documents from “M” to “F” then back to “M” as a way of marking herself as, in her words, “a transgender woman.” While surveillance technologies and their metrics expand through and beyond gender’s racial contours, Major’s narrative charts an alternative path of disruption that is not moored to representational coherence. As a fugitive on the run from classical recognition, Major illustrates the fierce strategies necessary to become, as Denise Ferreira da Silva suggests, a “nobody against the state.” By reading the film with theories of anarchism and the legal category of “unruliness” this talk proposes that an anti-state analysis is, and has been, central to the possibility of trans life. Cosponsored by the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. RSVP required at https://form.jotform.com/PozenFamilyCenter/eric-stanley

    Date: October 21, 2019
    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1322238641264448/

    0 0

    In May 2013, North Carolina’s chapter of Planned Parenthood sent women attired in 1960s garb to protest a bill that would allow employers to deny coverage of contraception for moral reasons because “ We love a good vintage look—but not when it’s running the state legislature.’” A popular protest sign that went viral in 2012 reads “I cannot believe I still have to protest this shit!” gesturing, as did other blogs, columns, and demonstration signs, to a teleological disruption. Telos has been profoundly important in political discourse in the United States. Often used rhetoric in the United States echoes this idea when inequality is described as an obstacle or misstep toward the “unfulfilled promise of America,” as opposed to endemic to the social contract. When many feminists and other progressive activists suggest that people or laws are “going against history,” they are imagining all of the entities that form the nation—“right”-thinking people, laws, spaces—as marching forward toward more egalitarianism in the nation. The temporality of freedom is or (should be) linear and inevitable. But abortion rights runs up against competing rights claims that revolve around competing ideas of progress and futurity. This talk explores the nature of the competing rights claims and how both the novel and television series adaptation of The Handmaid's Tale explore how competing temporalities is one of the essential challenges facing all conflicts about progress in the United States. Presented by the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT) and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Rebecca Wanzo is associate professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. She is the author of The Suffering Will Not Be Televised: African American Women and Sentimental Political Storytelling (2009), which explores the narrative conventions African Americans much adhere to in order to make their suffering legible to the state and other communities. Her essays have been published in journals such as American Literature, Camera Obscura, differences: a Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, The Journal of Popular Culture, and Women and Performance. Her research interests include popular culture, African American literature, critical race theory, and feminist media studies. Her newest monograph, The Content of Our Caricature: African American Comic Art and Political Belonging, traces the history of African American cartoonists’ engagement with racist caricature as a means of commenting on citizenship genres in the United States, and will be published by New York University Press in 2020.

    Date: October 14, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM

    See:http://ccct.uchicago.edu/1920/rebecca-wanzo

    0 0

    Michaele L. Ferguson Associate Professor of Political Science and Faculty Associate in the Women and Gender Studies Program, University of Colorado at Boulder"The Bandita Will Break Your Heart (A Love Letter to Iris Marion Young)" Tuesday, October 8 at 12pm Social Sciences Tea Room - 1126 E 59th St, Room 201 Lunch will be provided Iris Marion Young once described herself (borrowing from Linda Singer) as a bandita – a feminist bandit who selectively steals resources from male philosophers to serve her own political purposes, while leaving behind whatever of their work is sexist or unhelpful. This figure of the bandita, I argue, illustrates the structural conditions for the production of feminist theory today. The bandita is a figure of ambivalent desire: she is promiscuous, unfaithful, yet drawn back again and again to the very men whose philosophies she cannot fully abandon. I read Young and Singer together against the backdrop of Chris Kraus’s novel I Love Dick, which similarly explores the problem of how to articulate feminist desire in a culture that tells women our desire is only intelligible insofar as it is oriented towards patriarchy. And in so doing, they reveal another problem of feminist desire: the desire of feminist readers to find in feminist authors an unambivalent model that they could follow, a bandita whose outlaw life they could emulate. Yet the bandita will always disappoint; she will break feminist hearts because even her attempts at theoretical theft and philosophical promiscuity implicate her as an outlaw whose banditry is unintelligible without the law itself. She will tarry too long with Habermas or Sartre, she will seem to like dick a little too much, she will gain entry into the world of patriarchal gatekeepers a little too easily, and we will feel betrayed by her. Structurally, then, feminist theory is marked by a heterosexual logic of desire that encourages non feminist scholars to find feminists disloyal, and feminists to feel betrayed by one another. Michaele L. Ferguson is Associate Professor of Political Science and Faculty Associate in the Women and Gender Studies Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She is the author of Sharing Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2012) and co-editor with Lori J. Marso of W Stands for Women: How the George W. Bush Presidency Shaped a New Politics of Gender (Duke University Press, 2007), as well as articles in feminist and democratic theory. Part of the Feminism and the Radical Democratic Imaginary series. Co-sponsored by the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT).

    Date: October 8, 2019
    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/764206650698330/

    0 0

    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Tuesday, October 22nd: “'Where is the safe place?'; Legal socialization and intersections of police and interpersonal violence among young transgender women" Jane Hereth, Residential Fellow and PhD Candidate, Social Service Administration Discussant: Yanilda González, Assistant Professor, Social Service Administration Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don't hesitate to contact the workshop coordinator at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: October 22, 2019
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

    Loading...

older | 1 | .... | 31 | 32 | (Page 33) | 34 | 35 | 36 | newer


Loading...