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Upcoming Events

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    K-Sue Park, "Imagining Free Speech and Freedom of Expression for All" What would it look like if racial and sexual minorities could express themselves freely in America? If everyone could speak freely about their views without fear of the consequences? The historical and present reality is that free speech and expression all too often carry serious, even fatal consequences for members of many communities in this country. These “rights,” which Justice Cardozo called “the matrix, the indispensable condition, of nearly every other form of freedom,” are suppressed for many people in ways that implicate almost every aspect of life, and every kind of institution that a person encounters in the course of everyday living. In their own neighborhoods, minority individuals must curb their own expression and speech in order to avoid violence, both by private individuals and institutional actors like the police. People must work to escape the material negative consequences of being who they are by censoring their speech and expression at school, at work, as they encounter healthcare providers or receive other services, and even in their intimate relationships. These forms of silencing and censorship are exaggerated arenas more traditionally understood as political—in contexts of political protest and elections, for example—and may be most exacerbated in carceral institutional settings. What does it look like to fight for free speech and expression for all? What can lawyers do? First, it is impossible to realize this ideal without taking stock of the full spectrum of challenges to it. This endeavor includes recognizing the gap between the substantive right and the legal protections that the First Amendment can and does afford. This talk attempts to initiate an honest and full appraisal of the broader patterns of regulation and enforcement, as well as lack thereof, that distribute freedom and speech and expression to different groups of people. Finally, it asks what becomes of our notion of free speech and freedom of expression if we refuse to recognize the ways it is not, and has never been an entitlement of all. K-Sue Park is a Critical Race Studies Fellow at UCLA School of Law for 2017-2019. She was previously a Fellow at Equal Justice Works from 2015-2017. Park earned her B.A. summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa honors from Cornell University, her M.Phil with Distinction from University of Cambridge, her J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School., and her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. Her publications have appeared or is forthcoming in The History of the Present, Law and Social Inquiry, and Law & Society Review. Part of the free speech series.

    Date: May 23, 2018
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/185578022250480/

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    "50 Years Later: Memories of May '68" marks the events that brought nine million French students and workers together in a general strike and a unified uprising against capitalism, American imperialism, and Gaulism. This series explores the visual language of politics and protest, at once experimental and anonymous in a diverse array of “tracts” that used filmmaking as a direct, revolutionary action. We also explore the memory of May 1968 itself through Romain Goupil’s film Mourir à 30 ans, whose blend of home movies, archival footage, and interviews documents the energy of protest and the afterlife of revolution that at times proves fatal. In the wake of the uprisings of May 1968, French filmmakers addressed the turmoil through short political and experimental works. Maurice Lemaître’s "Soulèvement de la jeunesse" juxtaposes footage of the uprisings with an abstract soundtrack of Lettrist spoken word and song. Meanwhile, filmmakers including Chris Marker, Alain Resnais, and Jean-Luc Godard anonymously created silent, political “ciné-tracts” using leftist and French modernist film techniques. Many of these films will be shown with English subtitles for the first time. Introduced by Jennifer Wild, associate professor in the Department of Cinema and Media studies. (France, 85 min., 16mm and digital) Co-sponsored by the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project at the Center of the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and the France Chicago Center. Supported by the Cultural Service at the Consulate General of France in Chicago.

    Date: May 18, 2018
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2018/cin%C3%A9-tracts-and-soul%C3%A8vement-de-la-jeunesse

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    Quartiers Lointains: Emerging Afro-French filmmakers with curator CLAIRE DIAO and filmmaker JOSZA ANJEMBE How do we know ourselves when we receive only pieces of our family history? When we return unaware to the site of our childhood? With bitterness, humor, revolt and poetry, the filmmakers of Quartiers Lointains, a traveling program of short films by young French filmmakers of color, traverse the complex terrain of self-image creation. Screening followed by conversation with series co-curators Jennifer Wild (UChicago Cinema & Media Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures), Jacqueline Stewart (UChicago Cinema & Media Studies, Gray Center for Arts + Inquiry), Claire Diao, curator of the Quartiers Lointains Season 5, and Josza Anjembe, director of Le bleu blanc rouge de mes cheveux. Retour à Genoa City | Benoît Grimalt, 2017, 29min Granny and her brother Uncle Thomas have watched the same American soap opera, every single day, since 1989. Twenty years later, I come back to see them so they can fill me in on the 3,527 episodes I’ve missed. Nulle part | Askia Traoré, 2013, 25min Jacky returns to his childhood neighborhood after 20 years for a funeral, his friends and his first love. Le bleu blanc rouge de mes cheveux | Josza Anjembe, 2016, 21 min Seyna, a French teenager of Cameroonian descent, is passionate about the country where she was born. She aspires to only one thing: getting her French citizenship. But her father Amidou is vehemently opposed to this. Gagarine | Fanny Liatard and Jérémy Trouilh, 2015, 15min Twenty-year-old Youri lives with his mother in a social housing district near Paris. But the building is due to be demolished, and with it, the backdrop of his childhood dreams. How will he take off when he no longer has a spaceship? LOCATION: Harper Theater | 5238 S Harper This event is part of the Cinema 53 spring 2018 series, Intimités: Everyday Life in Contemporary Afro/French Cinema, curated by Jennifer Wild (UChicago Cinema & Media Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures) and Jacqueline Stewart (UChicago Cinema & Media Studies, Gray Center for Arts + Inquiry). Cinema 53 is a partnership between the historic Harper Theater in downtown Hyde Park and UChicago’s Gray Center for Arts & Inquiry. The spring series is co-presented with Institut Français, Cultural Services of the Consulat Général de France, UC’s France Chicago Center and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

    Date: May 10, 2018
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:https://graycenter.uchicago.edu/events/quartier-lointains-screening-and-conversation-with-claire-diao-and-josza-anjembe

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    K-Sue Park, "Imagining Free Speech and Freedom of Expression for All" What would it look like if racial and sexual minorities could express themselves freely in America? If everyone could speak freely about their views without fear of the consequences? The historical and present reality is that free speech and expression all too often carry serious, even fatal consequences for members of many communities in this country. These “rights,” which Justice Cardozo called “the matrix, the indispensable condition, of nearly every other form of freedom,” are suppressed for many people in ways that implicate almost every aspect of life, and every kind of institution that a person encounters in the course of everyday living. In their own neighborhoods, minority individuals must curb their own expression and speech in order to avoid violence, both by private individuals and institutional actors like the police. People must work to escape the material negative consequences of being who they are by censoring their speech and expression at school, at work, as they encounter healthcare providers or receive other services, and even in their intimate relationships. These forms of silencing and censorship are exaggerated arenas more traditionally understood as political—in contexts of political protest and elections, for example—and may be most exacerbated in carceral institutional settings. What does it look like to fight for free speech and expression for all? What can lawyers do? First, it is impossible to realize this ideal without taking stock of the full spectrum of challenges to it. This endeavor includes recognizing the gap between the substantive right and the legal protections that the First Amendment can and does afford. This talk attempts to initiate an honest and full appraisal of the broader patterns of regulation and enforcement, as well as lack thereof, that distribute freedom and speech and expression to different groups of people. Finally, it asks what becomes of our notion of free speech and freedom of expression if we refuse to recognize the ways it is not, and has never been an entitlement of all. K-Sue Park is a Critical Race Studies Fellow at UCLA School of Law for 2017-2019. She was previously a Fellow at Equal Justice Works from 2015-2017. Park earned her B.A. summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa honors from Cornell University, her M.Phil with Distinction from University of Cambridge, her J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School., and her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. Her publications have appeared or is forthcoming in The History of the Present, Law and Social Inquiry, and Law & Society Review. Part of the free speech series.

    Date: May 23, 2018
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/185578022250480/

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    As part of the PanAsia Solidarity Coalition’s Spring Festival, please join us for a CRES talk program from Chrysanthemum Tran. There will be a small reception to follow. Chrysanthemum Tran (she/they) is a Vietnamese-American poet, performer & teaching artist based in Providence by way of Oklahoma City. In 2016, she made history by becoming the first transfeminine finalist of the Women of the World Poetry Slam. Chrysanthemum is a 2016 Rustbelt Poetry Slam Champion & 2017 FEMS Poetry Slam Champion, as well as being awarded "Best Poet" at the 2016 National College Slam. Chrysanthemum is a Pink Door Fellow & the current lead teaching artist for the Providence Poetry Slam youth team. The Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) program presents a speaker series designed to bring to campus scholars whose work is relevant to coursework being taught at UChicago. Co-sponsored by PanAsia Solidarity Coalition, CSGS, and CSRPC.

    Date: May 14, 2018
    Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

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    A Critical Inquiry Visiting Professor Lecture The talk will examine the intimate contours of the social upheaval that characterized black life in the emergent ghetto in the first decades of the twentieth-century. The criminalization of everyday life and the regulation of forms of intimacy, affiliation and kinship document the afterlife of slavery and the emergence of a therapeutic carceral state intent on quashing practices of freedom. Professor Hartman will be introduced by CI Coeditor Lauren Berlant. A reception will follow.

    Date: May 10, 2018
    Time: 5:00 PM

    See:https://criticalinquiry.uchicago.edu/critical_inquiry_visiting_professor_saidiya_hartman/

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    K-Sue Park, "Imagining Free Speech and Freedom of Expression for All" What would it look like if racial and sexual minorities could express themselves freely in America? If everyone could speak freely about their views without fear of the consequences? The historical and present reality is that free speech and expression all too often carry serious, even fatal consequences for members of many communities in this country. These “rights,” which Justice Cardozo called “the matrix, the indispensable condition, of nearly every other form of freedom,” are suppressed for many people in ways that implicate almost every aspect of life, and every kind of institution that a person encounters in the course of everyday living. In their own neighborhoods, minority individuals must curb their own expression and speech in order to avoid violence, both by private individuals and institutional actors like the police. People must work to escape the material negative consequences of being who they are by censoring their speech and expression at school, at work, as they encounter healthcare providers or receive other services, and even in their intimate relationships. These forms of silencing and censorship are exaggerated arenas more traditionally understood as political—in contexts of political protest and elections, for example—and may be most exacerbated in carceral institutional settings. What does it look like to fight for free speech and expression for all? What can lawyers do? First, it is impossible to realize this ideal without taking stock of the full spectrum of challenges to it. This endeavor includes recognizing the gap between the substantive right and the legal protections that the First Amendment can and does afford. This talk attempts to initiate an honest and full appraisal of the broader patterns of regulation and enforcement, as well as lack thereof, that distribute freedom and speech and expression to different groups of people. Finally, it asks what becomes of our notion of free speech and freedom of expression if we refuse to recognize the ways it is not, and has never been an entitlement of all. K-Sue Park is a Critical Race Studies Fellow at UCLA School of Law for 2017-2019. She was previously a Fellow at Equal Justice Works from 2015-2017. Park earned her B.A. summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa honors from Cornell University, her M.Phil with Distinction from University of Cambridge, her J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School., and her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley. Her publications have appeared or is forthcoming in The History of the Present, Law and Social Inquiry, and Law & Society Review. Part of the free speech series.

    Date: May 23, 2018
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/185578022250480/

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    Liliana Angulo is a multi-media artist from Colombia whose work has been featured in individual and collective exhibits around the world. In her work, Angulo explores questions of the body and the image and their relationship to constructs of gender, ethnicity, language, history, and politics. Her work with communities of African descent illuminates issues of representation, racial discourse, performance, tradition, and the politics of reparation. Presented by CSGS, Theater and Performance Studies (TAPS), Provost’s Office, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and CSRPC. Free and open to the public.

    Date: May 17, 2018
    Time: 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

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    Part urban fantasy and part ethnographic group portrait, SWAGGER (Olivier Babinet, 2015, 84 min) focuses on a dozen teenagers getting by in the streets, projects and schools of Aulnay-sous-Bois, a suburb of Paris that made the headlines during the riots of 2005. Instead of concentrating on the hard knock life of his subjects, Babinet creates a colorful visual exploration, allowing the kids to showcase their dreams and desires over their fears. A visually striking, atypical portrait of French youth, SWAGGER mixes one-on-one interviews and impressively staged bursts of pure fiction — including a drone sequence where a fleet of CG spaceships invade the housing projects — oscillating between a documentary chronicle and something more imaginative, uncovering pockets of creativity behind the rough setting. Global Girls is a South Side organization for young African-American women that uses the performing arts to teach critical skills of communication, self-expression, and social responsibility. Through cultural exchanges and collaboration on performances with youth groups in other countries, Global Girls encourages international travel and global understanding, as well as communication, presentation and leadership skills. LOCATION: Harper Theater, 5238 S Harper, Chicago Free and open to the public This event is part of Cinema 53's 4-part spring series, Intimités: Everyday Life in Contemporary Afro/French Cinema; co-sponsored by Institut Français, Cultural Services of the Consulat Général de France, France Chicago Center, and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Cinema 53 is a screening and discussion series presenting conversation-provoking films by and about women and people of color. A partnership between the historic Harper Theater in downtown Hyde Park and UChicago’s Gray Center for Arts & Inquiry, Cinema 53 brings together scholars, artists, students and audiences from the South Side and beyond to consider how visual cultures reflect, and reflect upon, enduring inequalities and revolutionary futures.

    Date: May 31, 2018
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:https://graycenter.uchicago.edu/events/swagger-screening-conversation-with-jennifer-wild-jacqueline-stewart-and-global-girls

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop This quarter’s theme is “Alternative Archives,” curated by Chase Joynt (SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality). Workshops will focus on alternative approaches to archival work that often anchor interdisciplinary scholarship and creative pursuits. May 29th: New Voices on Tape, New Bodies on Stage: The Origins of Feminist Comedy, 1965-1976 Mariana E. Brandman, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Chicago Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Jaclyn Wong, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/. If you have any questions or accommodation requests, please don’t hesitate to contact the workshop coordinators at gssworkshop@gmail.com.

    Date: May 29, 2018
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    A screening of Unstoppable Feat, The Dances of Ed Mock, a documentary film and archive exploring the late San Francisco postmodern choreographer. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker and artist Brontez Purnell. Ed Mock died in 1986 at the height of the AIDS epidemic; his story continues to engage contemporary conversations. Purnell states, “I believe Ed Mock is the missing choreographic link between Alvin Ailey, Anna Halprin, and Bill T. Jones. He is my direct predecessor, creatively. We – artists, black queers, Bay Area dancers, gay men - have to extract our collective past and create the historical record.” Purnell reimagined the work and life of Ed Mock through archival research, interviews, choreographic interpretations, music and film. The new and re-created choreography significantly expands Mock’s publicly accessible archives for future dance audiences. Purnell wrote, choreographed, produced and directed the final film. Brontez Purnell is an Oakland-based black gay filmmaker, musician, dancer, and writer, whose “explorations of blackness, queerness, maleness, and Southernness take sharp, confident turns between raunch and rhapsody." Hailing from Triana, Alabama, he relocated to the Bay Area at 19, began playing in bands, touring North America, South America and Europe many times. He is the author of the cult zine Fag School, frontman for the band the Younger Lovers, and the founder and choreographer of the Brontez Purnell Dance Company. He is the author of The Cruising Diaries, Johnny Would You Love Me If My Dick Were Bigger, and Since I Laid My Burden Down. This event is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, the Office of LGBTQ Student Life, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, the Center for Identity + Inclusion, and the Department of Cinema and Media Studies.

    Date: May 24, 2018
    Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/166649897306776/

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    Liliana Angulo presents a mixed media exhibit that reflects on the constructions of race and the privilege of representation in the urban space and in the subjective realm. The exhibit contains works developed while the artists lived in Chicago. Race, representation and violence are the main issues connecting the objects. Free and open to the public. About the artist: Liliana Angulo is a multi-media artist from Colombia. Her work has been featured in individual and collective exhibits across the Americas, Asia, and Europe. In her work, Angulo has explored questions of the body and the image and their relationship to constructs of gender, ethnicity, language, history, and politics. She uses a variety of media including photography, video installation, sculpture performance, and sound.Her commitment to working with communities of African descent has led her to use art to examine issues of representation, racial discourses, identity, performative practices, cultural traditions, and the politics of reparation.

    Starts: May 14, 2018
    Ends: May 19, 2018
    Time: 9:00 AM

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    Brian Jacobson, Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies and History, The University of Toronto"Sulfurous French Cinema and the Political Life/Style of Gas" This paper is about French cinema’s contribution to the richly agonistic visual politics of French petroleum. It focuses on the two decades after the 1951 discovery of a substantial deposit of sulfur-rich natural gas in the French south—a discovery that had, by the early 1960s, transformed the nation’s economy and its energy politics. Using a series of industrial shorts produced to promote this gas in the 1950s and a film with seemingly little to do with the gas, Roger Vadim’s 1966 adaptation of Emile Zola’s 1871 novel La curée, the paper traces the material and semiotic energy exchanges that entangled the worlds of French art, technology, and science in the early years of the “two cultures” debate.

    Date: May 18, 2018
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Part urban fantasy and part ethnographic group portrait, SWAGGER (Olivier Babinet, 2015, 84 min) focuses on a dozen teenagers getting by in the streets, projects and schools of Aulnay-sous-Bois, a suburb of Paris that made the headlines during the riots of 2005. Instead of concentrating on the hard knock life of his subjects, Babinet creates a colorful visual exploration, allowing the kids to showcase their dreams and desires over their fears. A visually striking, atypical portrait of French youth, SWAGGER mixes one-on-one interviews and impressively staged bursts of pure fiction — including a drone sequence where a fleet of CG spaceships invade the housing projects — oscillating between a documentary chronicle and something more imaginative, uncovering pockets of creativity behind the rough setting. Global Girls is a South Side organization for young African-American women that uses the performing arts to teach critical skills of communication, self-expression, and social responsibility. Through cultural exchanges and collaboration on performances with youth groups in other countries, Global Girls encourages international travel and global understanding, as well as communication, presentation and leadership skills. LOCATION: Harper Theater, 5238 S Harper, Chicago Free and open to the public This event is part of Cinema 53's 4-part spring series, Intimités: Everyday Life in Contemporary Afro/French Cinema; co-sponsored by Institut Français, Cultural Services of the Consulat Général de France, France Chicago Center, and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Cinema 53 is a screening and discussion series presenting conversation-provoking films by and about women and people of color. A partnership between the historic Harper Theater in downtown Hyde Park and UChicago’s Gray Center for Arts & Inquiry, Cinema 53 brings together scholars, artists, students and audiences from the South Side and beyond to consider how visual cultures reflect, and reflect upon, enduring inequalities and revolutionary futures.

    Date: May 31, 2018
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:https://graycenter.uchicago.edu/events/swagger-screening-conversation-with-jennifer-wild-jacqueline-stewart-and-global-girls

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    50 Years Later: Memories of May '68 marks the events that brought nine million French students and workers together in a general strike and a unified uprising against capitalism, American imperialism, and Gaulism. This series explores the visual language of politics and protest, at once experimental and anonymous in a diverse array of “tracts” that used filmmaking as a direct, revolutionary action. We also explore the memory of May 1968 itself through Romain Goupil’s film Mourir à 30 ans, whose blend of home movies, archival footage, and interviews documents the energy of protest and the afterlife of revolution that at times proves fatal. Rarely seen in the United States, Romain Goupil’s documentary chronicles his and his friends’ firsthand experiences as militant, teenage Trotskyites in 1960s France during the heyday of French student movements that culminated with the events of May 1968. Michel Recanati was a part of Goupil’s activist entourage who committed suicide in 1978. Prompted by his death, Goupil crafts a vibrantly raw autobiographical essay-style film that uses found footage and a range of sources including photographs, home movies, and interviews. Drawing on Recanati’s life trajectory to structure the film, Goupil succeeds in evoking the implosion of the leftist movement in 1960s and 1970s France while also constructing a filmic meditation on the transition from adolescence to adulthood during this tumultuous historical moment. Following the film, Goupil will participate in a Q&A moderated by Jennifer Wild, associate professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies. (1982, 97 min., DCP, courtesy of the Institut Français in Paris) Co-sponsored by the France Chicago Center, the Film Studies Center, the Department of Cinema & Media Studies, the Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, the Office of Study Abroad in the College, and the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, with support from the Cultural Services at the Consulate General of France in Chicago.

    Date: June 1, 2018
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2018/mourir-%C3%A0-30-ans-half-life

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    Please join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) and the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) as we celebrate the end of the 2017-2018 school year. We will have great food (with plenty of veg-friendly options), drinks, and music to welcome the summer. We will also be bidding a fond farewell to the visiting University of Puerto Rico students. All are welcome!

    Date: June 6, 2018
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/239478516629178/

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    Join us from 2:30 to 4:00 pm for short BA presentations, followed by a wonderful reception! All are welcome!

    Date: June 7, 2018
    Time: 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

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    Rose Al Abosy (Biology/GSS '17, currently working at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) and Anna Nathanson (GSS '17, currently attending Harvard Law School) will talk about their experiences applying to medical and law school and how their interests in gender/sexuality studies inform their approaches to the medical and legal worlds. Lunch will be provided.

    Date: June 1, 2018
    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/219692038807303/

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    Join the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality for a Town Hall meeting with University of Chicago’s Eric M. Heath, Associate Vice President for Safety and Security, and Bridget Collier, Associate Provost for Equal Opportunity Programs and Title IX Coordinator. We envision this town hall meeting as a forum for members of our community to engage with Heath and Collier about university-supported security alerts and communications. Heath and Collier will respond to a short set of questions designed by a student committee, and then we will open the floor for a wider discussion. Lunch will be provided.

    Date: May 31, 2018
    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/232339920856894/

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    The Division of the Humanities Dean's Advisory Committee on Diversity & Inclusion will host a mixer on Thurs, Oct 26. We hope to have many diverse graduate students, faculty, and staff who are committed to equity and inclusion in in attendance. This is a great opportunity to begin making connections with and sharing ideas with other like minded members of our community. For more information, questions, and disability accommodations, please contact Ingrid Sagor (isagor@uchicago.edu)

    Date: October 26, 2018
    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

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