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Upcoming Events

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    The third event in our roleplaying series, in this game night we will try out several recent and independently produced roleplaying games that deal with gender and sexuality. Play as a guide for Bluebeard's Wife, form a queer Utopian commune, conspire to bring together two renaissance princes. All this and more! Presented by the Alternate Realities and Virtual Worlds Project.

    Date: February 14, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/228930017555638/

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 2/13/2017 @ 7:00 PM Parting Glances (Bill Sherwood, 1991) · The first mainstream film to directly address the AIDS epidemic shows gay life without the Reagan-era moralizing. The story is a 24-hour look into the lives of Robert and Michael, a gay couple living in New York, but the real focus of the movie is Nick (Steve Buscemi), an HIV positive musician. Buscemi, in a star making performance, gives a beautifully acted portrayal of an HIV positive gay man, adding grace and humanity to a stigmatized and stereotyped identity. runtime: 90m format: 16mm

    Date: February 13, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    Radical Relations! Memory, Objects and the Generation of the Political On February 6, an exhibit exploring black liberation politics on the South Side of Chicago from 1967-2017 will open at The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS). Curated by Romi Crawford, Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute, this exhibit will display images of black artists, poets, writers, educators, and political organizers in everyday life, as well as display their personal communicative and decorative materials that have now become memorabilia, traces of a generation’s cultivation of radical care, a will to make social change felt at the level of their communal, familial, and intimate relations. Romi Crawford, Ph.D. is Associate Professor in Visual and Critical Studies and Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research revolves primarily around formations of racial and gendered identity and the relation to American film, visual arts, and popular culture. She was previously the Curator and Director of Education and Public Programs at the Studio Museum in Harlem and founder of the Crawford and Sloan Gallery (NYC, 1994-1998). Her publications include writings in Art Journal; Cinema Remixed and Reloaded: Black Women Film and Video Artists (University of Washington, 2008); Black Light/White Noise: Sound and Light in Contemporary Art (Contemporary Art Contemporary Art Museum Houston, 2007); Frequency (Studio Museum in Harlem, 2006); Art and Social Justice Education: Culture as Commons (Routledge, 2011) and Service Media (Green Lantern, 2013). Free and open to the public. #CareAtChicago This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture.

    Date: February 6, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care/

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    Kristel Clayville (Ph.D candidate, Divinity) on “Avoiding Burnout: Self-Knowledge and Care for Dark Times” Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

    Date: February 16, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 2/20/2017 @ 7:00 PM Panic Bodies (Mike Hoolboom, 1998) · An experimental video diary, Panic Bodies is a six-part cinematic meditation on living, and dying with the AIDS virus. The film is a poetic and beautiful exploration in various formats and narratives of the experience of living with AIDS, of being determined by your identification with the virus, of living under the ticking clock of one's own imminent demise. A poem of a film, it keeps you enthralled throughout with its bold originality and cinematic beauty. runtime: 70m format: 16mm

    Date: February 20, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. February 7: Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Cal Poly Pomona, “Brown and Gay in LA: Race, Masculinity, and Sexuality in the Immigrant City” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: February 21, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Join the Counter Cinema/Counter Media Project at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality for a special screening of "Lives:Visible" followed by a discussion with filmmaker Michelle Citron. ABOUT THE FILM Lesbians in a box. That’s how I think of the trove of over 2000 snapshots that are the heart of my film, Lives: Visible. The photos were taken by Norma and Virginia who lived together as a lesbian couple in Chicago’s East Rogers Park neighborhood for almost 50 years. They died in their 80s leaving behind snapshots of themselves and their friends spanning over four decades, 1936 -1975. Lives:Visible is the second and final film I’m creating using Norma and Virginia’s photos. The first film, Leftovers, focused exclusively on Norma and Virginia during the last decade of their life when they were cut off from family and friends. Lives:Visible expands the story to explore the cultural and historical context of the photographs. Lives:Visible uses two cultures – Chicago’s vibrant pre-Stonewall lesbian community and the Kodak snapshot – to explore the ephemeral nature of all cultures, even life itself. ABOUT THE FILMMAKER Michelle Citron is an award-winning digital and film artist whose work includes the interactive narratives Cocktails & Appetizers, Mixed Greens, and As American As Apple Pie (collected at queerfeast.com) and the films Daughter Rite, Parthenogenesis, What You Take For Granted…, Leftovers, and Lives:Visible. She is the author of the award-winning book, Home Movies and Other Necessary Fictions. Her media art explores the lives of women – mothers and daughters, women in the workplace, the trauma of incest, lesbian culture – as well as ethnic identity. These works blend experimental styles with melodrama and an exploration of the border between documentary and fiction. An additional theme that flows through all Citron’s work is an examination of the autobiographical impulse, particularly as it is expressed through home movies, snapshots, and memoir. Citron’s work has been shown at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Museum of Contemporary Art/Chicago, as well as the New Directors, Berlin, London, Edinburgh, Oberhausen, NYMIX, and SeNef film and New Media festivals, among others. Her films and interactive narratives are distributed worldwide and are in the permanent collections of over two hundred universities and museums. She has received two National Endowment for the Arts Filmmaking Fellowships, a National Endowment for the Humanities Media Grant, and three Illinois Arts Council Artist Fellowships - for digital arts, filmmaking, and screenwriting. She’s holds a PhD in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Wisconsin. This event is free and open to the public.

    Date: February 15, 2017
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:http://www.livesvisible.com/

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. February 7: Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Cal Poly Pomona, “Brown and Gay in LA: Race, Masculinity, and Sexuality in the Immigrant City” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: February 21, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Art & Care as Resistance & Love, a panel with Lauren Ash, Lauren Berlant (English), Laura Letinsky (Visual Arts), and Karen Reimer (MFA ’89; School of the Art Institute of Chicago). Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

    Date: February 23, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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    Join The Chicago Center of H.I.V Elimination, the LGBTQ Student Life Center, and the Organization of Black Students for a discussion on the award-winning film Moonlight. This event will take place on Wednesday, February 22nd from 6:00PM-7:30PM in the Community Lounge of the Center for Identity and Inclusion (5710 S. Woodlawn Ave). We will discuss topics including sexuality and masculinity in the black community. Free refreshments will be served. We hope to see you there! Channyn Lynn Parker will be co-facilitating!

    Date: February 22, 2017
    Time: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

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    Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook introduce us to their recent work on critical playware for cognitive dissonance. Since 2010 Adam Trowbridge and Jessica Westbrook collaborate as Channel TWo [CH2], a Chicago-based research/media studio that produces critical playware. CH2 is interested in luck, levels, and trespassing through the contexts of landscape, interactivity, data, and augmented reality. CH2 uses media, game platforms, communication ephemera, and mobile apps to reveal paradigms, complexity, contradictions, and cognitive dissonance. CH2's work has been featured in Motherboard Vice, The Creators Project, Art Papers, The Intercept, and Media-N. CH2 awards and commissions include National Science Foundation funding, a SPACES R+D Award, a Rhizome.org Commission, a Turbulence Net Art Commission, and a Terminal Net Art Commission. Their creative projects have been exhibited/screened in museums, galleries, and cultural centers nationally and internationally. Presented by the Alternate Realities and Virtual Worlds Project.

    Date: February 24, 2017
    Time: 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1958377694399435/

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 2/27/2017 @ 7:00 PM Fast Trip, Long Drop (Gregg Bordowitz, 1994) · A recently diagnosed Bordowitz is forced to stare down his own mortality. The film, loosely plotted around his memory of infection and anger at having been handed a death sentence, weaves scenes of intense personal vulnerability and political antagonism. Beautifully cut, this documentary combines a melancholic attachment to life with a fear and desire for death. The film plays alongside Bordowitz's "some aspects of a shared lifestyle." Co-sponsored by Video Data Bank at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, vdb.org runtime: 76m format: Digital

    Date: February 27, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 3/6/2017 @ 7:00 PM Philadelphia (Jonathan Demme, 1993) · One of the first big budget Hollywood films to treat the AIDS crisis, Philadelphia tells the story of an infected lawyer, Andrew Beckett, who is fired from his high profile law firm. Beckett hires Joe Miller, a homophobic personal injury lawyer, to press his wrongful dismissal case in court. The film humanizes Beckett and transforms Miller as the court case unfolds. A famous opening sequence lovingly captures the city and imbues the film with a liberal sentimentality. runtime: 125m format: 35mm

    Date: March 6, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. March 7: Christopher Kindell, PhD Candidate in History, University of Chicago, “’Brothel of the Pacific’: Laikini Wahine, Syphilis, and the Urban Regulation of Sex in Honolulu” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: March 7, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Teenage Afghan refugee Sonita Alizadeh lives in a Tehran shelter, dreaming of a future as a rap superstar despite Iran’s prohibition against women singing in public, performing for kids at the shelter, and working as a cleaning woman. Her family has a different future in mind for her: her mother announces that they plan to sell Sonita as a bride for $9000 so the family can buy Sonita’s brother a wife. Sonita makes a bold request to director Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami, reigniting the discussion about how filmmakers should relate to their subjects. Purdue University professor Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, author of Muslim Cool: Race, Religion, and Hip Hop in the United States, introduces the screening. (Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami, Iran, 2015, 91 min., DCP) Su’ad Abdul Khabeer is a scholar-artist-activist who uses anthropology and performance to explore the intersections of race and popular culture. She is the author of the groundbreaking study of Islam, hip hop, and race in the US, Muslim Cool: Race, Religion and Hip Hop in the United States and founder of sapelosquare.com, an online resource on Black Muslims in the US. Su'ad is currently an assistant professor of anthropology and African American studies at Purdue University. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.

    Date: March 9, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2017/sonita

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    Funded by a faculty grant through the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and organized Kimberly Hoang and Adom Getachew, this panel will examine how gender and global capitalism co-constitute different kinds of inequalities. The 2008 global financial crisis has spurred a renewed interest in histories of capitalism and political economy across a number of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. This effort has sought to make the economy visible and legible to various forms of scholarly inquiry. However, missing form these existing conversations is a crucial gendered analysis. With a focus on Asia and Africa in particular, panelists will explore questions of finance, labor, debt and the gendered relations they produce, destabilize and reconstitute. Panelists: Ann Pitcher, Professor of African Studies and Political Science, University of Michigan Raka Ray, Professor of Sociology and South and Southeast Asian Studies, University of California Berkeley Jennifer Cole, Professor of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago

    Date: March 13, 2017
    Time: 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    See:https://egc2017.wordpress.com/

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    The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality is grateful to faculty from across departments, divisions and schools who affiliate with the Center and generously contribute their time and energies to the Center and its continued development. Please join us on Thursday, March 2 as we take the evening to celebrate recent books by some of the CSGS’s amazing faculty affiliates. · Lauren Berlant (English), Sex, or the Unbearable · Daisy Delogu (Romance Languages and Literatures), Allegorical Bodies: Power and Gender in Late Medieval France · Wendy Doniger (Divinity), Redeeming the Kamasutra and The Ring of Truth, and Other Myths of Sex and Jewelry · Martha Feldman (Music), The Castrato: Reflections on Natures and Kinds · Kimberly Kay Hoang (Sociology), Dealing in Desire: Asian Ascendancy, Western Decline, and the Hidden Currencies of Global Sex Work · Alessandra L. Gonzalez (Economics), Islamic Feminism in Kuwait: The Politics and Paradoxes · Jonathan Lyon (History), Princely Brothers and Sisters: The Sibling Bond in German Politics, 1100-1250 · Lucy Pick (Divinity), Pilgrimage · Johanna Ransmeier (History), Sold People: Traffickers and Family Life in North China · Jennifer Scappetone (English), Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice and The Republic of Exit 43: Outtakes & Scores from an Archaeology and Pop-Up Opera of the Corporate Dump · Jennifer Wild (Cinema and Media Studies), The Parisian Avant-Garde in the Age of Cinema · Tara Zahra (History), The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World · Linda M. G. Zerilli (Political Science and Gender and Sexuality Studies), A Democratic Theory of Judgment

    Date: March 2, 2017
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/222717811530415/

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    8:15 a.m.–9:00 a.m. Breakfast 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. Panel 3: Gender, Genre, and Authorship Julia Abramson (University of Oklahoma), “Genre Trouble: Gender, Form, and the Politics of Revolutionary Exile, 1793-1798.” Rebecca Crisafulli (University of Chicago), “Updating Miller and Kamuf’s Franco-American Authorship Querelle: Does an Author’s Gender Identity Matter?” Kathleen Loysen (Montclair State University), “Early Modern French Storytelling: The Intersection of Women’s Authorship and the Querelle des femmes.” Respondent: Françoise Lavocat (Université Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle/Neubauer Visiting Fellow, University of Chicago) 11:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Break 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Panel 4: Corporeal Feminisms Camille Froidevaux-Metterie (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne/Sciences Po Paris), “The ‘Corporeal’ Querelle. French Feminists and the Female Body/ La querelle ‘corporelle’. Les féministes françaises et le corps des femmes.” Jean-Thomas Tremblay (University of Chicago), “Political Breathing: Somatics of Feminist Coalition.” Respondent TBD 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Lunch 2:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Panel 5: Gender and Political Power Leah Chang (The George Washington University), “Renaissance Queens and the Politics of Authenticity.” Eliane Viennot (Université de Saint-Étienne), “Nouvelles perspectives sur la chronologie de la Querelle” Respondent: Daisy Delogu (University of Chicago) 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Panel 6: Franco-American Debates on Gender Laure Bereni (CNRS and Centre Maurice Halbwachs), “Between Normalization and Disruption. Reflections on the Institutionalization of Gender Studies in France.” Bruno Perreau (MIT), “Gender as Immunity: How France Conceptualizes America.” Respondent: Alison James (University of Chicago)

    Date: April 22, 2017
    Time: 8:15 AM - 4:30 PM

    See:https://voices.uchicago.edu/querelles/conference-program/

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    1:45 p.m. Welcome 2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m. Panel 1: Law, Literature, and Gender Mary Anne Case (University of Chicago), “Showing that ‘Femme est a L’omme pareille’ or The Role of Sex Stereotypes and of the Law in the ‘Gender’ Wars.” Annabel Kim (Harvard University), “The Literary is Political: Monique Wittig’s Les Guérillères, a rewriting of La Cité des dames.” Respondent: Françoise Meltzer (University of Chicago) 3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Coffee break 4:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Panel 2: Renaissance/Early Modern Debates Anne Duggan (Wayne State University), “The Querelle des femmes and Nicolas Boileau’s “Satire X”: Going beyond Perrault.” Esther van Dyke (University of Chicago), “The Freedom of Refusal: The Role of Angélique Arnauld and Jaqueline Pascal in the Jansenist Controversy.” Scott Francis (University of Pennsylvania), “Marguerite de Navarre and the Indifference of Clothing: The Querelle des femmes meets Christian Liberty.” Respondent: Ellen McClure (University of Illinois at Chicago) 6:00 p.m. Reception

    Date: April 21, 2017
    Time: 1:45 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://voices.uchicago.edu/querelles/conference-program/

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    Join us for a discussion with Pidgeon Pagonis, intersex activist and filmmaker! Pidgeon will give a talk about what it means to be an intersex person of color in today’s political and social climate. The talk will be followed with a screening of the documentary, "The Son I Never Had: Growing Up Intersex!" Pidgeon Pagonis is an intersex activist, filmmaker, writer and artist. They’ve recently appeared in National Geographic, in a special issue titled, “Gender Revolution.” In 2015, they received the LGBT Champion of Change Award by the White House. Learn more about Pidgeon Pagonis: http://www.pidgeonismy.name/ This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested. Please RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intersextionality-a-talk-with-pidgeon-pagonis-tickets-32603692522 Persons with disabilities who need an accommodation in order to particpate in this event should contact CSGS at csgs@lists.uchicago.edu or 773.702.9936. The event is sponsored by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture, the Office of LGBTQ Student Life, the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, UChicago Graduate Council, and the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights.

    Date: April 6, 2017
    Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1106872109458457/

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