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Upcoming Events

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    A full day of self- and community-care activities for students and staff that include a discussion with mental health professionals, yoga, treats, and crafts, including a session on making “valentines to the future.” Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma.

    Date: February 10, 2017
    Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. February 7: Jeffrey Parker, PhD Candidate in Sociology, University of Chicago, “Exile in Guyville, or The Stroller and the Damage Done: Women in Public, Gentrification, and the Politics of Blame” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: February 7, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Atist Romi Crawford (Ph.D. ’10; School of the Art Institute of Chicago) will be present to open her exhibit in the community room at the Center for the month of February, focused on black power and politics in Chicago from 1967-2017, a display images of black political organizers in everyday life, as well as the communicative and decorative material that has now become memorabilia, traces of a generation’s will to make change communal and real. Romi Crawford, Ph.D. is Associate Professor in Visual and Critical Studies and Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research revolves primarily around formations of racial and gendered identity and the relation to American film, visual arts, and popular culture. She was previously the Curator and Director of Education and Public Programs at the Studio Museum in Harlem and founder of the Crawford and Sloan Gallery (NYC, 1994-1998). Her publications include writings in Art Journal; Cinema Remixed and Reloaded: Black Women Film and Video Artists (University of Washington, 2008); Black Light/White Noise: Sound and Light in Contemporary Art (Contemporary Art Contemporary Art Museum Houston, 2007); Frequency (Studio Museum in Harlem, 2006); Art and Social Justice Education: Culture as Commons (Routledge, 2011) and Service Media (Green Lantern, 2013). Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma.

    Date: February 6, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. January 24: Lindsey Conklin, PhD Candidate in Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, “Neoliberal Amman: Mapping the Middle Class as Reputational Community” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: January 24, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. January 10: Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Chicago, “Criminalized Masculinities: How Policing Shapes the Construction of Gender and Sexuality in Poor Black Communities.” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: January 10, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Please join us for this interactive panel which will explore strategies for and challenges related to teaching gender and sexuality across disciplines. Guest speakers include Demetra Kasimis (Political Science), Deborah Nelson (English), Lucy Pick (Divinity), and Sonali Thakkar (English).

    Date: February 1, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

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    Join the Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture and The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality as we mark the inauguration of the forty-fifth president of the United States with RE:action - a day of resistance and rebuilding, an event designed to reconnect and reinvigorate our community by sharing resources and opportunities for political and social action and by celebrating our strengths, our power and our voices. The day will include: 2:00-5:00pm AN ACTIVISM FAIR Connect with local organizations and activist groups working on issues impacted by the national political climate and a Trump presidency; 2:00-8:00pm A BOOK EXCHANGE/FREE LIBRARY Bring a book/Take a book. Titles on radical politics, theory and history welcome. 4:30-6:00pm A film screening; and 6:00-8:00pm An evening party with live DJ. Visit https://bitly.com/uchicagoreaction for more information.

    Date: January 19, 2017
    Time: 2:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    See:https://bitly.com/uchicagoreaction

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 1/30/2017 @ 7:00 PM Silence = Death (Rosa von Praunheim, 1990) · The first of Rosa von Praunheim and Phil Zucker's collaborative AIDS trilogy, this documentary explores queer responses to the epidemic by New York-based artists. Interviews with painters such as Keith Haring and poet Allen Ginsberg are interspersed with performance vignettes by David Wojnarowicz that protest the bigoted hypocrisy and moral shaming of AIDS victims. The film, and the activist-inspired art it presents, are calls to action and forms of resisting silence. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive runtime: 60m format: 16mm

    Date: January 30, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 1/23/2017 @ 7:00 PM Blue (Derek Jarman, 1993) · In Derek Jarman's final film, made just before the artist died of an AIDS-related illness, a single projected monochrome blue serves as a metonym for his failing eyesight. Jarman and his cast recite a poetic script that explores interpretations of the color blue through narrative vignettes of his illness and a searching spirituality. This provocative film evokes the images it refuses to show, using the medium to invite the viewer into the space of physical deterioration. runtime: 79m format: 35mm

    Date: January 23, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    What does it mean to document a subculture? In 1968, Flawless Sabrina, the doyenne of the New York City drag pageant circuit, decided to document the drag community she had developed during the ‘60s, producing The Queen with director Frank Simon, co-producer Andy Warhol, and others. Since then, the film has been nearly impossible to access, a legend of the queer counterculture until its recent rediscovery. Most notably, excerpts from the film have been featured in the title sequence for Amazon.com’s Transparent, but the film as a whole remains elusive and hard to see. This program pairs the 1968 documentary with Lipstick City, a contemporary experimental narrative film that also seeks to document a drag community. Starring Chicago’s leading drag queens of color, Lipstick City queers the archival project of the documentary through structuring its preservation of this subculture around a nonlinear revenge narrative. Curated by Nicole Morse (CMS) as part of the Film Studies Center's Graduate Student Curatorial Program. (Frank Simon, USA, 1968, 68 min., screening courtesy of www.thequeen1968firstlegaldvd.com; Shea Couleé, USA, 2016, 9 min., digital video) Shea Couleé graduated from Columbia College Chicago with a degree in fashion design, and entered the Chicago drag scene in 2013, becoming a notable performer and host locally. Lipstick City is the highest production value film ever produced by drag queens about drag queens and has been garnering national attention.

    Date: January 20, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://filmstudiescenter.uchicago.edu/events/2017/queen-lipstick-city

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 1/9/2017 @ 7:00 PM The Living End (Gregg Araki, 1992) · This classic of the New Queer Cinema is both sexy and funny, while still taking on the AIDS crisis in a critical way. In this "gay Thelma and Louise", Jon, a timid film critic, takes home Luke, a sexy drifter who turns a supposed one-night stand into a crime-filled road trip. Both HIV positive, they turn their backs on their lives, embracing a new way of living ruled by the motto, "Fuck Everything." This film is a statement against Hollywoodizing of the AIDS epidemic. runtime: 81m format: Digital

    Date: January 9, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    Radical Relations! Memory, Objects and the Generation of the Political February 6, an exhibit exploring black liberation politics on the South Side of Chicago from 1967-2017 will open at The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS). Curated by Romi Crawford, Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute, this exhibit will display images of black artists, poets, writers, educators, and political organizers in everyday life, as well as display their personal communicative and decorative materials that have now become memorabilia, traces of a generation’s cultivation of radical care, a will to make social change felt at the level of their communal, familial, and intimate relations. Romi Crawford, Ph.D. is Associate Professor in Visual and Critical Studies and Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research revolves primarily around formations of racial and gendered identity and the relation to American film, visual arts, and popular culture. She was previously the Curator and Director of Education and Public Programs at the Studio Museum in Harlem and founder of the Crawford and Sloan Gallery (NYC, 1994-1998). Her publications include writings in Art Journal; Cinema Remixed and Reloaded: Black Women Film and Video Artists (University of Washington, 2008); Black Light/White Noise: Sound and Light in Contemporary Art (Contemporary Art Contemporary Art Museum Houston, 2007); Frequency (Studio Museum in Harlem, 2006); Art and Social Justice Education: Culture as Commons (Routledge, 2011) and Service Media (Green Lantern, 2013). Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

    Date: February 6, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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    This is the second in our series of role-playing nights, and we invite you back to adventure again. In the last session players created characters and were introduced to our world, now we will bring those characters to life in an adventure. We have character sheets ready for those of you who couldn't make the first event. If you've never roleplayed before, we want to show you the ropes! Presented by the Alternate Realities and Virtual Worlds Project.

    Date: January 31, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/443062206084073/

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    Ever wonder what its like to be an orc? Join the Alternate Realities & Virtual Worlds series as we play Dungeons & Dragons, the original role-playing game. This is an introduction for those who might not have had a chance to learn this game as kids, and to play with thoughtful and friendly folks. We'll play, and talk about what it means to imagine yourself as something else. Presented by the Alternate Realities and Virtual Worlds Project.

    Date: January 17, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/667997970027901/

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    Bringing a minoritarian performance studies perspective to bear on performances executed by Nina Simone between 1958 and 1971, this talk theorizes minoritarian performance as a revolutionary practice born from the dialectical tension between freedom and its negation. The work of minoritarian performance, it argues, is to materialize Simone’s desire “to know what it would feel like to be free,” affect a black feminist reorganization of the limiting conditions of the present, negotiate the unjust distribution of death and exploitation towards black life, and rehearse and realize the potential for what Ernst Bloch described as a life in freedom and happiness. Joshua Chambers-Letson is assistant professor of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of A Race So Different: Law and Performance in Asian America (NYU Press, 2013), winner of the 2014 Outstanding Book Award from the Association of Theater in Higher Education (ATHE), and is currently working on a book manuscript titled On the Work of Minoritarian Performance. Along with Ann Pellegrini and Tavia Nyong’o, he is a series co-editor of the Sexual Cultures series of NYU Press. This event is free and open to the public. Part of the LGBTQ Studies Project and the Artists' Salon at the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

    Date: February 9, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/1340927592585718/

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    Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop The winter quarter theme is “Sex and Gender and the City,” and will be curated by Forrest Stuart, Assistant Professor of Sociology, with outside guest Anthony Ocampo, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona. Papers and presentations will address topics related to the ways in which sex and gender unfold in the urban context. February 7: Jeffrey Parker, PhD Candidate in Sociology, University of Chicago, “Exile in Guyville, or The Stroller and the Damage Done: Women in Public, Gentrification, and the Politics of Blame” Papers are made available in advance via our email list. If you are interested in joining the email list, go to http://lists.uchicago.edu/web/subscribe/sexuality-gender-wkshp or contact the workshop coordinators, Annie Heffernan and Danya Lagos, at gssworkshop@gmail.com. Additional workshop information, including past schedules, can be found at http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/.

    Date: February 7, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://voices.uchicago.edu/genderandsexuality/

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    Mondays at Doc Films Film and AIDS: Early Queer Responses to the AIDS Epidemic Programmed by Daniel Schultz and Alex Wolfson Drawing from a range of directors, this series surveys a diversity of aesthetic reactions to the AIDS epidemic, from queer revolt to Hollywood recuperation. The films negotiate the somatic and psychic pressures of the illness by contesting the moral, racial, sexual, and gendered discourses that surround its experience, presenting film as a site of both political intervention and stylistic experimentation. Films include Gregg Araki's The Living End, Derek Jarman's Blue, and Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia. This series was supported by The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality at the University of Chicago. 2/6/2017 @ 7:00 PM A Virus Knows No Morals (Rosa von Praunheim, 1986) · Made on a shoestring budget, this dark, campy comedy, performed by unprofessional actors, activists, friends of the director, as well as Rosa himself, was controversial for treating the AIDS crises in comedic form. A Virus Knows No Morals took shots in all directions, at the various institutions responsible—medical, governmental, social—for the exponentially growing body count. An important, irreverent, and entertaining early document in the fight against AIDS. Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive runtime: 84m format: 16mm

    Date: February 6, 2017
    Time: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    See:http://docfilms.uchicago.edu/dev/calendar/2017/winter/mondays.shtml

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    A full day of self- and community-care activities for students and staff that include a discussion with mental health professionals, yoga, treats, and crafts, including a session on making “valentines to the future.” Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

    Date: February 10, 2017
    Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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    Please join Disability Studies Reading Group, Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, and Center for East European, Russian/Eurasian Studies for a talk by Kateřina Kolářová, Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Department of Gender Studies, Charles University in Prague Sex, AIDS, and the Dystopic Impulse: The Affective Landscapes of Post-Socialism And Pedagogies of Self-Transformation The talk explores the dystopic impulse in the narratives of the East Central Europe as they emerge in the aftermath of the neoliberal shock doctrine in the second half of the 1990s. Reading cinematographic images of the youth “homosexual” sex work and of the pornographic industry in the Czech Republic catering mostly to the transnational audience, the talk interrogates the dystopic critique at the moment of the onset of capitalism and its homophobic, racialized and ableist horizons. And yet, I want to propose that these difficult and troubling texts can be read as queer sites from which to reconceptualise, destabilize and de-center the white ‘Northern’ canon of feminist anti-racist disability theory. The voices and lives of the Roma, the youth and oftentimes homeless sex workers, people living with/in proximity to HIV and AIDS, as I argue, offer ways to expand the archives from which to imagine feminist intersectional methodologies so urgently needed in the contemporary moment. February 2, 2017 @ 5PM Common Room, CSGS/CSRPC The event is free and open to public. CSGS is physically accessible and CART will be provided. Please contact CSGS with any other access requests at csgs@lists.uchicago.edu or 773.702.9936.

    Date: February 2, 2017
    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    See:https://www.facebook.com/events/150868055411506/

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    Kristel Clayville (Ph.D candidate, Divinity) on “Avoiding Burnout: Self-Knowledge and Care for Dark Times” Free and open to the public. This event is part of Care@Chicago, a project designed to examine and practice forms of self-care and ask what constitutes repair and relief in states and times of trauma. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture.

    Date: February 16, 2017
    Time: 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    See:http://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/projects/care

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